Ohio IR Day

We recently surveyed interest in holding a special day dedicated to Institutional Repositories across Ohio as part of Open Access Week and received a tremendous response to our inquiry! Thus, we are moving forward with holding an informal get-together and knowledge share.

The Ohio IR Day will take place on October 24, 2014 at the State Library of Ohio Boardroom (274 E 1st Ave # 100, Columbus, OH 43201) from 10:00am-2:00pm.

The day will consist of introductions, Lightning Rounds, Birds of a Feather discussion, and a speaker from bepress on IRs.

We are currently soliciting ideas for the Lightning Rounds. We hope to have topics covered such as workflow, outreach, content types, assessment, scholarly communication, etc. If you would like to participate in the Lightning Rounds, please include your topic when registering and plan to speak for 5 minutes.

Instead of providing lunch, we ask you to bring your own or contribute $5.00 and we will pick up pizza and drinks.

Register here – Registration Form
Direction to State Library – http://library.ohio.gov/marketing/directions

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

We look forward to seeing you there!

-Jane, Elisabeth, and Andrew

CORE Scholar: An Introduction

Welcome to the new faculty and students of Wright State!

A new school year is upon us, and Digital Services would like to highlight what CORE Scholar can do for our community.

CORE Scholar is an institutional repository sponsored by the Wright State University Libraries and managed by the Digital Services Department. The IR collects and makes available the scholarly output of Wright State faculty and students. The material is free and open to the world. Users only need an internet connection to see and download the superb research of Wright State University.

Digital Services handles the population and management of CORE Scholar. Below are some of the great services offered by DS:

  • Uploading of Scholarly material (peer-reviewed articles, conference proceedings, presentations, published abstracts, etc.) to CORE Scholar
  • Journal Management, including editor and peer-review assignment, customization of look, and the ability to email authors
  • Conference modules can collect all proceedings, videos, photos, and much more from any conference. Check out the Pride and Prejudice Conference from last year
  • Copyrights checking, advice on retaining author’s rights, and help drafting data management plans
  • Hit and download counts of all material uploaded in CORE Scholar delivered to your email every month
  • We provide a profile page for Wright State Faculty, called SelectedWorks, which can showcase an author’s scholarship, their awards, personal achievements, pertinent websites, and more
  • Digitization of materials for our CORE Scholar authors

How do you get started? Simply contact us. We look forward to hearing from you.

This is the first post of a series covering what Digital Services can offer. Look out for more information!

Get rowdy, Raiders!

P.S.—Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter! @wsudigiserv.

‘Hack the Library’ the 29th Annual Computers in Libraries Conference 2014

I attended the 29th annual Computers in Libraries Conference in Washington DC. The conference itself is regarded as one of the most comprehensive; covering all aspects of library and information delivery technology. With the wide range of topics, the programs and presentation themes varied widely, with the key driver as ‘moving the library forward in the digital age.’

I had the pleasure of attending many programs during the conference, with several standouts, such as (to name a few); Super Searcher Tips, highlighted new strategies, techniques and tips for getting the most out of web research; Re-Imagining the Library Website Experience, gave insights and ideas from experienced and knowledgeable library web experts about design/redesign of engaging websites and using analytics; Weathering the Virtual Library, this session looks at virtual library’s immediate response to storms, steps taken in the following days, and addressing future challenges; Flipping Your Library, which explored ways in which librarians use technology tools and web resources to flip the library experience through websites, screencasts, blogs, and social media.

There were many other interesting topics throughout the conference, but the keynote was by far my favorite. Presented by Mike Lydon, (Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative & Author, Tactical Urbanism), he covered Hacking Library Spaces, Lessons from Tactical Urbanism. The presentation was so interesting because of its high relevancy – our society is rapidly changing – communities, campuses, the publishing industry; this naturally plays a huge impact on our libraries and also poses a challenge to our system and how we can (quickly) adapt. Mr. Lydon brought examples of how he transformed parking lots into parks and plazas, putting up informational and directional signs to encourage walking in neighborhoods, and slowing traffic by altering curbs with traffic cones. Lyon’s key components are simple. He advocates for communities to build, measure, and learn. He encouraged library institutions throughout the county to start small and get their prototype out and operating as soon as possible.

As I listened to Mr. Lydon’s keynote my mind began to think of how I can incorporate these principles into a digital services environment.  It was an exciting talk to listen to, stretching my imagination and providing lots of ideas to take back to my department. He stressed five steps in order to embed tactical urbanism into the library: pilot test, improve the interface between the library and the city, use existing initiatives, and my favorite scale down to scale up. He ended his speech by saying, “If the city is the original internet, then the library is its server.”

Outside of presentations, there was time between sessions to visit booths to view digital equipment, and learn about new innovative techniques that are being applied throughout North America. This was a valuable time to learn new practices that could be applied for better workflow or help set goals for future processes and even equipment that could one day be utilized in the WSU Libraries.

Finally, I got to participate in a luncheon hosted by the Smithsonian Institution.  It was a great opportunity to look behind the scenes of the Smithsonian exhibits and collections. Gale Cengage partnered with the Smithsonian and is digitizing primary source materials, content that is only available onsite at the Smithsonian Institution from deep within the museums, libraries, and archives of the world’s largest museum and research complex, making it available digitally, in searchable formats, and integrating it with software that aligns with scholarly workflow.

The Smithsonian’s content is centered in the world’s largest museum complexes and their Imaging Center digitizes this content with a vast array of equipment to provide high quality digital images. The digitized documents within Smithsonian Collections Online are rich in their ability to be the source of new and exciting scholarship.

I always appreciate the opportunity to step outside of a normal workday and learn more about the changes that are happening to the library system on a greater level. The conference provided great insight to how, like everything else, the library system is always evolving and it’s important to stay up on the latest technologies and practices, as we continue to ‘move the library forward in the digital age.’

Thoughts on a data migration

When I arrived at Wright State University Libraries in the end of January 2013, as a new librarian, I had no idea that one task would dominate so much of my time here. Shortly after my arrival we were alerted to the fact that our DSpace-based Institutional Repository would no longer be supported. Since I was originally going to be the primary librarian uploading content to CORE (our DSpace IR) I was chosen to be the “migration guy.”

The migration impacted the next year of my life. I was suddenly in charge of moving 5,000 items from our DSpace platform to our new Digital Commons repository. We began talking about the migration in February and March of 2013, and the last nail was driven into the migration’s coffin in December of that year.

I presented on my experience at the 2013 DCGLUG (Digital Commons Great Lakes Users’ Group) Conference, for the OHIODIG (Ohio Digitization Interest Group) in January, and most recently at SOA’s (Society of Ohio Archivists) Annual Conference.  The last two presentations were performed as part of a group. I wanted to use this post to collect what I learned from these presentations:

NUMBER 1: It’s a learning process.

I didn’t know how to perform a website audit. I didn’t know how the handles (persistent URLs) were maintained. I didn’t really know much about our collections. That being said, I investigated how others prepared a website audit (they counted links and pages). I researched the Handle System and ultimately found out that maintaining it would incur a separate expense as well as cost us time. I also learned about the Wright Brothers, a variety of oral histories from the area, and more.

NUMBER 2: It is a learning process, but be practical about how you use your time.

In my research for ways to perform an audit I found that some people used web-crawler software; however, I found it to be unreliable and difficult to retrieve consistent results. So I abandoned it. I manually clicked through every page listing the communities, series, and all the items attached to records.

We were offered a PERL application from Asbury Theological Seminary. I lacked the familiarity to use it properly; thus, I abandoned that too.

I had to make the decision about whether to spend extra time attempting to understand these programs with an unsure final outcome, or I could get to work, performing tedious tasks, but accomplishing something. I choose to start the project.

NUMBER 3: The Most Important Thing about Migrating Your Content…It takes time.

The process will take longer than you estimate. This was a truth echoed by my peers as well. No matter the planning and best efforts, there will always be unforeseen anomalies that need their own special solution. The differences in how the two systems worked often required me to re-evaluate my planning.

In the end I learned a lot about our collections, DSpace, Digital Commons, and most importantly how to plan and carry out a migration between systems. I’m sure, that if I ever have to migrate again, there will be new issues and concerns; however, I have a solid plan of attack and am confident on how to proceed. I’ll just hope I don’t have to perform another migration for a long time…

OhioLINK Subject Librarians Webinar: Researcher Services

Yesterday, I presented at the OhioLINK Subject Librarians Webinar: Researcher Services. The focus of my talk was the types of services an institutional repository can offer to undergrads with a research agenda. In preparation for this presentation, I took a hard look at the benefits undergrads can receive from posting in an IR, like CORE Scholar.

First, undergrads are able to include papers, presentations, posters, and data in our repository. By doing so, students are making their materials available to a worldwide audience. We are hopeful that this will help them while job hunting or applying to graduate school. Second, they have the opportunity to publish an article in an open access peer reviewed journal. Lastly, we are educating these users at an early stage of their careers about authors’ rights and open access.  These students are future faculty, scholars, and researchers. If we can get them to understand the importance of author’s rights and open access now, it will be normal practice for them to seek out open access journals, question publisher’s policies, and ask for rights to use their articles as they wish.

There are more benefits that we hope to offer undergrads as our IR develops. We are looking to include the ability to add Creative Commons licenses, use ORCID identifiers, and altmetrics. If you would like to learn more or get a copy of my presentation, please don’t hesitate to contact me (jane.wildermuth@wright.edu).

SPARC and the Library Publishing Forum

During the first week of March, I attended the SPARC Open Access Meeting and the inaugural Library Publishing Forum in Kansas City, MO. Those in attendance were involved in open access and library publishing in various positions, but librarians seemed to make up a majority of the crowd.

SPARC’s theme for the 2014 meeting was “Convergence” and speakers focused on the issues of open access, open data, and open educational resources. Major topics included collaboration both within the library and beyond, transparency in publishing (conflicts of interest, who published, who paid, etc.), and a general battle cry of open is best. I furiously filled a notebook with thoughts and ideas and finished the conference feeling excited about the possibilities for open access on the Wright State campus.

The Library Publishing Forum had a decidedly different atmosphere, in my opinion. SPARC felt like the dreamer conference, and the LPF was the “that’s great, but how do we implement it?” conference. The dreams I left the SPARC Conference with took the shape of tangible initiatives that could be implemented in the Libraries and across campus.

In short, I have big plans for scholarly communication, open access, and the library as publisher in the next couple of years, thanks to these conferences. I would love to talk with you about it, so please don’t hesitate to email me. Stay tuned!

Digitizing the Wright Family Photograph Album

The Wright Brothers are among the most historical of Dayton families, and the interest in their legacy continues. For this reason we were asked by Special Collections and Archives to digitize and make available through CORE Scholar the Wright Family Album. Fortunately for Wright State, much of their history lies within the Libraries’ Special Collections and Archives, and the family album is no exception. The Wright Family album was begun circa 1880, and contains portraits of members and friends of the Wright family. The process of maintaining historical preservation of the album while digitizing is a delicate process.

wrightalbum_blog2As often the case, archived materials are very brittle. There was no question that the family album had to be shot in our camera room; such a historical piece can be both cumbersome to work with and very brittle in nature, due to the aging over time. Because of these factors, neither our Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner, or the Indus BookScanner 9000 were used during the digitization process. The capturing of the Wright album was done by our Nikon D200 SLR camera positioned on our Industria Fototecnica Firenze Super Repro copy stand, because of the flexibility it allows during the capturing process. The Wright Family album was shot using archival standard gloves and the album was positioned on the camera table using archival foam book cradles. Our camera table and copy stand allows us the convenience to suspend the Nikon overhead on a vertical beam in order to take pictures of our objects from above.  This gives us an even balanced image of the materials being captured. Along with our Nikon camera, there’s accompanying photo editing software called Camera Control Pro 2 with ViewNX 2 used to capture archival based raw files to be edited and stored. Once the family album was shot, the images were processed using Adobe Photoshop, allowing us to straighten and crop the images accordingly.wrightalbum_blog1

You can now view the newly shot Wright Family Photograph Album on, CORE Scholar.

The album itself contains 7 tintypes; which is essentially the primitive day version of a Polaroid. The process was taking a direct positive of a photograph, on a thin sheet of iron – commonly used during carnivals for quick takeaway pictures. You can view these tintypes within the Wright Album on our website, CORE Scholar.

For more information about Wright State University’s Institutional Repository please visit our website, CORE Scholar.

For more information about Special Collections and Archives and the Wright Brother’s Collection visit their website, Special Collections and Archives.

Visualizing Wright State’s Global Reach

 In late February of 2014, bepress released the newest iteration of Digital Commons 7.8. This new release instituted several new and exciting features for their institutional repositories. They added pagination options to their series collections, updated their taxonomy of disciplines, but the coolest and most immediately obvious feature is the Readership Activity Map.

readership activity map

CORE Scholar readership activity map

This map provides real-time data visualization of full-text downloads. What does that mean? Visitors to the site will be able to see real-world usage of CORE Scholar. This map helps illustrate the impact Wright State research has in the world at large. You might see downloads from Fairborn or Dayton, but you’re just as likely to see downloads in Dusseldorf, Germany or Pretoria, South Africa. Bepress has stated that eventually they would like to make this information available at the Collection and Journal levels, providing a much more granular experience. For the moment, you can view CORE Scholar’s Readership Activity Map at our website, CORE Scholar.

Remember to check back here for more interesting Institutional Repository, Scholarly Communications, and Digitization news, knowledge, and know-how.

To read more about Digital Commons’ Readership Activity Map on their blog post Pioneering a New Tool for Demonstrating Real-World Impact.

For more information about Wright State University’s Institutional Repository please visit our website CORE Scholar.

 

Welcome

Welcome to Knowledge Exchange, Wright State University’s Digital Services site.   We will focus on digitization, institutional repositories, and scholarly communication.  It will be written by the staff members of Wright State University’s Digital Services Department.  We hope to share our knowledge, know-how, and news with other library, museum, archives professionals who work with digitization and institutional repositories.  Some of the topics we will be covering in upcoming posts are digitizing nitrate negatives and tintypes, migrating content from dSpace to Digital Commons, and calibration.  Your comments and suggestion are welcome.