Category Archives: Institutional repository

Ohio IR Day

We recently surveyed interest in holding a special day dedicated to Institutional Repositories across Ohio as part of Open Access Week and received a tremendous response to our inquiry! Thus, we are moving forward with holding an informal get-together and knowledge share.

The Ohio IR Day will take place on October 24, 2014 at the State Library of Ohio Boardroom (274 E 1st Ave # 100, Columbus, OH 43201) from 10:00am-2:00pm.

The day will consist of introductions, Lightning Rounds, Birds of a Feather discussion, and a speaker from bepress on IRs.

We are currently soliciting ideas for the Lightning Rounds. We hope to have topics covered such as workflow, outreach, content types, assessment, scholarly communication, etc. If you would like to participate in the Lightning Rounds, please include your topic when registering and plan to speak for 5 minutes.

Instead of providing lunch, we ask you to bring your own or contribute $5.00 and we will pick up pizza and drinks.

Register here – Registration Form
Direction to State Library – http://library.ohio.gov/marketing/directions

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

We look forward to seeing you there!

-Jane, Elisabeth, and Andrew

CORE Scholar: An Introduction

Welcome to the new faculty and students of Wright State!

A new school year is upon us, and Digital Services would like to highlight what CORE Scholar can do for our community.

CORE Scholar is an institutional repository sponsored by the Wright State University Libraries and managed by the Digital Services Department. The IR collects and makes available the scholarly output of Wright State faculty and students. The material is free and open to the world. Users only need an internet connection to see and download the superb research of Wright State University.

Digital Services handles the population and management of CORE Scholar. Below are some of the great services offered by DS:

  • Uploading of Scholarly material (peer-reviewed articles, conference proceedings, presentations, published abstracts, etc.) to CORE Scholar
  • Journal Management, including editor and peer-review assignment, customization of look, and the ability to email authors
  • Conference modules can collect all proceedings, videos, photos, and much more from any conference. Check out the Pride and Prejudice Conference from last year
  • Copyrights checking, advice on retaining author’s rights, and help drafting data management plans
  • Hit and download counts of all material uploaded in CORE Scholar delivered to your email every month
  • We provide a profile page for Wright State Faculty, called SelectedWorks, which can showcase an author’s scholarship, their awards, personal achievements, pertinent websites, and more
  • Digitization of materials for our CORE Scholar authors

How do you get started? Simply contact us. We look forward to hearing from you.

This is the first post of a series covering what Digital Services can offer. Look out for more information!

Get rowdy, Raiders!

P.S.—Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter! @wsudigiserv.

Thoughts on a data migration

When I arrived at Wright State University Libraries in the end of January 2013, as a new librarian, I had no idea that one task would dominate so much of my time here. Shortly after my arrival we were alerted to the fact that our DSpace-based Institutional Repository would no longer be supported. Since I was originally going to be the primary librarian uploading content to CORE (our DSpace IR) I was chosen to be the “migration guy.”

The migration impacted the next year of my life. I was suddenly in charge of moving 5,000 items from our DSpace platform to our new Digital Commons repository. We began talking about the migration in February and March of 2013, and the last nail was driven into the migration’s coffin in December of that year.

I presented on my experience at the 2013 DCGLUG (Digital Commons Great Lakes Users’ Group) Conference, for the OHIODIG (Ohio Digitization Interest Group) in January, and most recently at SOA’s (Society of Ohio Archivists) Annual Conference.  The last two presentations were performed as part of a group. I wanted to use this post to collect what I learned from these presentations:

NUMBER 1: It’s a learning process.

I didn’t know how to perform a website audit. I didn’t know how the handles (persistent URLs) were maintained. I didn’t really know much about our collections. That being said, I investigated how others prepared a website audit (they counted links and pages). I researched the Handle System and ultimately found out that maintaining it would incur a separate expense as well as cost us time. I also learned about the Wright Brothers, a variety of oral histories from the area, and more.

NUMBER 2: It is a learning process, but be practical about how you use your time.

In my research for ways to perform an audit I found that some people used web-crawler software; however, I found it to be unreliable and difficult to retrieve consistent results. So I abandoned it. I manually clicked through every page listing the communities, series, and all the items attached to records.

We were offered a PERL application from Asbury Theological Seminary. I lacked the familiarity to use it properly; thus, I abandoned that too.

I had to make the decision about whether to spend extra time attempting to understand these programs with an unsure final outcome, or I could get to work, performing tedious tasks, but accomplishing something. I choose to start the project.

NUMBER 3: The Most Important Thing about Migrating Your Content…It takes time.

The process will take longer than you estimate. This was a truth echoed by my peers as well. No matter the planning and best efforts, there will always be unforeseen anomalies that need their own special solution. The differences in how the two systems worked often required me to re-evaluate my planning.

In the end I learned a lot about our collections, DSpace, Digital Commons, and most importantly how to plan and carry out a migration between systems. I’m sure, that if I ever have to migrate again, there will be new issues and concerns; however, I have a solid plan of attack and am confident on how to proceed. I’ll just hope I don’t have to perform another migration for a long time…

OhioLINK Subject Librarians Webinar: Researcher Services

Yesterday, I presented at the OhioLINK Subject Librarians Webinar: Researcher Services. The focus of my talk was the types of services an institutional repository can offer to undergrads with a research agenda. In preparation for this presentation, I took a hard look at the benefits undergrads can receive from posting in an IR, like CORE Scholar.

First, undergrads are able to include papers, presentations, posters, and data in our repository. By doing so, students are making their materials available to a worldwide audience. We are hopeful that this will help them while job hunting or applying to graduate school. Second, they have the opportunity to publish an article in an open access peer reviewed journal. Lastly, we are educating these users at an early stage of their careers about authors’ rights and open access.  These students are future faculty, scholars, and researchers. If we can get them to understand the importance of author’s rights and open access now, it will be normal practice for them to seek out open access journals, question publisher’s policies, and ask for rights to use their articles as they wish.

There are more benefits that we hope to offer undergrads as our IR develops. We are looking to include the ability to add Creative Commons licenses, use ORCID identifiers, and altmetrics. If you would like to learn more or get a copy of my presentation, please don’t hesitate to contact me (jane.wildermuth@wright.edu).