Category Archives: Institutional repository

Introducing the SelectedWorks Redesign!

We are excited to announce an upgrade to SelectedWorks profile pages!

UPDATED LOOK

Dr. Cigrang's updated profile

Dr. Cigrang’s updated profile

A new card view has been implemented that provides a preview of content. A reader can easily scroll through the new SelectedWorks and instantly get an idea of the work each author has done. Each item is displayed upfront, eliminating the “view more” button. Every file format is supported. This means any work done by you can be uploaded into your SelectedWorks profile. Think beyond articles and books to anything from video, audio, data, and more!

UPDATED AUTHOR TOOLS

Updated Author Dashboard

Updated Author Dashboard

The new SelectedWorks delivers new author tools that make measuring your impact simple. The author dashboard now comes with a map that displays where downloads are happening. You are able to zoom in on almost exact locations of downloads. Additionally, each pinpoint on the map displays the number of downloads. Clicking on these points provides the title being downloaded. The author dashboard also offers a handful of other metrics, including which countries and institutions are downloading your work, which sites readers are using to find your work, a timeline of your download history, and a list of your top downloaded items.

UPDATED PROMOTION

The new SelectedWorks makes it even easier for readers to follow your work. The “Follow” button is now far more prominent at the top of the page. Also, authors can take control of their SelectedWorks profile. The new design allows for easy editing through WYSIWIGs.

Prominent Follow Button

Prominent Follow Button

Remember, your SelectedWorks profile is already Search Engine Optimized to ensure maximum exposure to your work. The upgraded look will showcase your work with a contemporary feel, an easy-to-read card layout, and richer metrics.

 

Veterans’ Voices on WYSO

We are excited to announce an addition to our collections on CORE Scholar. Veterans’ Voices on WYSO is a series of stories about veterans reentering civilian life in the Miami Valley.  WYSO, the public radio station for the Miami Valley, collaborated with student veterans at the Wright State University’s Veteran and Military Center to create these interesting narratives. The narratives created provide an interesting and powerful insight into the troubles and triumphs of reentering the civilian life after service.

The WYSO Veterans’ Voices project is part of a broader effort to capture the stories of veterans. The Library of Congress, through the Veterans History Project, is collecting biographical information about veterans, and oral histories are recorded to ensure the various accounts of military life in the 20th and 21st centuries is not lost. These oral histories can be viewed at the Veterans’ Voices series on CORE Scholar.

Both collections give a voice to the brave veterans of our country. We are extremely pleased to play a part in sharing them!

Open Access Week 2015 Workshops – Open for Collaboration

OAlogo

International Open Access Week 2015 is quickly approaching, and to celebrate, the Wright State University Libraries is offering several exciting workshops for faculty and staff. This year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration,” strives to emphasize amazing results that comes from different groups working together toward the common goal of ground-breaking research.

The workshops, listed below, are focused on helping the WSU campus better take advantage of the services offered through CORE Scholar, Wright State’s own Open Access Institutional Repository. CORE Scholar connects readers from around the world with WSU research, facilitates connections between researchers through the Digital Commons Network, and advances the cause of Open Access Collaboration.

Please join us for any or all of the workshops. Attendees may register on the WSU Libraries’ Events and Workshops page: http://libraries.wright.edu/events/oaweek.

Journals in CORE Scholar
Monday, October 19, 2015
Room 315, Dunbar Library: 11:30am – 12:00pm

Have you ever consider starting your own peer review journal? Are you already an editor of a journal and are looking for a new platform? Jane Wildermuth and Elisabeth Shook will discuss the set-up and maintenance of journals in CORE Scholar. Participants will become familiar with the capabilities of the system, including customized designs and workflows, and professional grade peer-review tools.

Conferences/Events in CORE Scholar
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Room 315, Dunbar Library: 11:30am – 12:00pm

Capture the valuable output of your events and conferences, big and small, with CORE Scholar’s conference/events modules. Participants will discover how CORE Scholar provides you with an easy way to manage paper submissions, peer review, schedules, and the publication of the materials from your event.

Predatory Publishers and Author’s Rights
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
Room 315, Dunbar Library: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Jane Wildermuth, Head of Digital Services, and Elisabeth Shook, Digital Initiatives Librarian, discuss issues surrounding predatory publishers and holding on to author copyrights. Attendees will 1) evaluate various publishers to learn how to identify predatory publishers, 2) discover resources available to help in avoiding predatory publishers, and 3) understand how to keep their copyright during the publishing process.

What’s New in SelectedWorks
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Room 315, Dunbar Library: 11:30am – 12:30pm

Learn how CORE Scholar can help faculty create a SelectedWorks page to distribute scholarly materials in an attractive and professional manner. Even if you already have a SelectedWorks page, plan on attending to learn from Jane Wildermuth and Elisabeth Shook about the new improvements to SelectedWorks profile pages.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions. We look forward to seeing you!

Another Successful Ohio IR Day

On April 17th, the Spring Ohio IR Day took place at the State Library of Ohio.  Thirty-two librarians, archivist, and technologist came together to share experiences and learn about institutional repositories.  We heard presentations on harvesting content, ORCID, flippingbooks, 360 Photography, and more.  Emily Flynn, OhioLINK, did a great job summarizing the day in her blog post.

We are soliciting feedback at this point.  If you have any suggestions, thoughts, or concerns please do not hesitate to contact me (jane.wildermuth@wright.edu) and I will share this information with the IR Day planning committee.

Ohio IR Day – Spring 2015

The agenda has now been set for the upcoming Ohio IR Day on April 17, 2015 at the State Library of Ohio.  There will be lightning rounds that will focus on different aspects of managing institutional repositories. Emily Flynn of OhioLINK will be the main speaker, discussing how to harvest ETDs into your repository and how OhioLINK utilizes ORCID in the ETD Center.

April 17, 2015 Schedule:

  • 10:00 – 10:05 am   – Welcome
  • 10:05 – 10:30 am – Institutional Introductions
  • 10:30-11:00 am – Emily Flynn, OhioLINK, How to Harvest ETDs into your Repository & The Use of ORCID in the ETD Center
  • 11:00 – Noon – Lightning Rounds
    • Andrew Harris – Issues between IR and EDS
    • Greg Martin – FlippingBook
    • Amy Parsons – Mapping between DC and MARC
    • Fran Rice – 360 Photography
    • Liz Richardson – Using Digital Commons Submission Management to Manage Workflow
    • Elisabeth Shook – Dayton Literary Peace Prize
  • Noon – 12:30pm – Lunch
  • 12:30 – 1:30pm – Birds of a Feather Discussions

If you would like to come to the event, please register soon.  Be sure to indicate if you would like to be included for lunch.  We will be ordering pizza, salad, & drinks for $8 per person.

The Three P’s of Scholarly Publishing

Many publishers are slowly loosening restrictions on authors who wish to repost their work. A large number now allow an author or an author’s employer to post the pre-print or post-print on the web with certain restrictions (a publisher’s statement, an embargo, etc.). This is great news for authors and Institutional Repositories alike, but what we have found is that many authors don’t understand the differences between the various iterations of their work. Below is a short explanation:

Pre-Print: The pre-print version of a publication generally refers to the first draft. This is the version before any peer-review has been performed, and well before the publisher applies any formatting.

Post-Print: The post-print often refers to the version of a work after peer-review has been done and edits have been made, but before the publisher applies branding and formatting. It may be called the final author’s version, the accepted version, or some iteration thereof.

Publisher’s Version: Publisher’s version is the version of the work that is actually published. It generally features the publisher’s branding and formatting, and has page numbers, copyright statements, and anything else the author did not apply in their version.

Many publishers, including well-known names such as Springer, Elsevier, and Wiley, allow pre-prints and post-prints to be added to an author’s Institutional Repository. Unfortunately, many authors do not save their final version before publication, so the opportunity to distribute material to scholars world-wide is missed. We urge faculty to hold on to all versions of their work.

It may be difficult to find the specific copyright parameters you are expected to follow via the publisher’s website. A helpful tool, SHERPA/RoMEO, keeps a current database of most publisher policies, and links you directly to the publisher’s copyright page. SHERPA/RoMEO is incredibly helpful, but it is sometimes hard to keep-up-to-date. I encourage you to use SHERA/RoMEO as starting point, but not as the final word.

As always, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to email Digital Services. We are happy to help!

Ohio IR Day 2014: Successful Meeting, Great Potential

On October 24th, Wright State’s Digital Services Department hosted the first Ohio IR Day at the State Library of Ohio. Librarians, archivists, and technologists from throughout the state came together to discuss IRs as a part of celebrating Open Access Week. A total of 32 people attended Ohio IR Day. Attendees came from a variety of institutions including public and private academic libraries, OhioLINK, the Ohio History Connection, and even an academic librarian from out of state.

The day began with institutional introductions in an effort to allow people to familiarize themselves with each other. I heard the same phrase repeated by many of the attendees during this session, “I talked to you on the phone or corresponded with you via email. It is great to put a face with a name.” Next, Ann Connolly, from bepress presented on the Role of IRs in Open Access. She demonstrated the many ways IRs have moved the OA movement forward with examples from several Ohio bepress subscribers. Ann then encouraged audience participation by asking for ideas and suggestions on recruiting content. Participants shared experiences on working with 2nd year faculty, using Digital Measures as a means to capture scholarship, and encouraging the faculty to publish postprints in the IR.

Lightning rounds followed Ann’s presentation. A total of 10 presentations were given on topics such as creating an IR using Hydra, workflow, openURLs, enhancing oral histories, and copyright. We hope to have this material online in the near future at CORE Scholar (corescholar.libraries.wright.edu).

Following the Lightning Rounds, the attendees were broken into smaller groups to hold Birds of a Feather discussions. These discussions focused on topics such as content recruitment, workflow/staffing, digital humanities, archival collections, etc. Groups had lively discussions, were able to hear about projects others were doing, and answered questions about how to tackle some of the issues that confront their IRs.

The meeting closed with a discussion about where to go from here. Many in attendance liked the format saying it was informal and easy to get to. Attendees were happy that there was no registration fee. Others worried that the model may not be sustainable. I will send out a survey shortly to ask for more feedback on the meeting. Please feel free to fill it out even if you did not attend. We would like to hear about how you envision the next meeting.

Overall, I thought the meeting was a great success. The day is exactly what we intended. We wanted to get to know others in the state who are doing the same kind of work and hear about their projects, workflow, roadblocks, successes, and failures. I truly look forward to the next time we meet.

Data, SHARE, and a Symposium

Data is a big deal these days. Many United States’ grants are now requiring the PIs to have plans in place for long-term storage of and access to data resulting from research conducted with grant money.  With so much data being generated, it is more important than ever before for scientists to ensure data is properly archived, preserved, and made accessible to others.

Until very recently, data was not the main focus of research. What counted were the results. You hypothesize, conduct the research, analyze the data, and publish. If another scientist would like access to the data, he/she would have to contact the PI (as long as the contact information was accurate), and hope someone thought to keep multiple copies in technology formats that weren’t obsolete.

Data was getting lost, forgotten about, or simply was inaccessible by those outside the research. This data was often collected by means of a taxpayer-funded grant provided by a U.S. Government agency, and many taxpayers were unable to access it.

The White House took notice. In early 2013, the Office of Science and Technology Policy issued a Memorandum outlining the plan for any government agency with over $100 million in annual research and development expenses to devise a plan for increased public access to the data, research, and the resulting publications.

That was a hefty declaration that left many scrambling to understand what role research universities should play, could play, and would play in preserving and facilitating access to this research data. On June 7, 2013, the SHARE (SHared Access Research Ecosystem) Initiative was proposed by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU). The Initiative declared that university-based repositories will take on the responsibilities of long-term preservation and global access of the publically funded research. SHARE was awarded a $1 million grant, has formed multiple steering and working groups, and is tirelessly exploring how to build the network of repositories that will house the research.

The WSU Digital Services Team has also been exploring what role Wright State and CORE Scholar could play in housing and sharing research data resulting from public funds. We are able to provide PIs with data management services necessary for grants, including help and advice on writing the Data Management Plan, and the storage, preservation, and dissemination of data to a worldwide audience.

In honor of Open Access Week and to better educate the WSU campus on issues involving data management, Digital Services has invited Dr. Caroline Whitacre, Vice President for Research at The Ohio State University, and member of the SHARE Steering Group, to speak to WSU faculty and staff about SHARE during the Wright State University/Cleveland State University Joint Open Access Symposium on October 22nd.

Dr. Whitacre will speak at 2:45 pm in Dunbar Library 441. Event details and full schedule can be found at http://libraries.wright.edu/calendar/events.php. If you have any questions regarding the Symposium, Data Management Plans, or Open Access, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Ohio IR Day

We recently surveyed interest in holding a special day dedicated to Institutional Repositories across Ohio as part of Open Access Week and received a tremendous response to our inquiry! Thus, we are moving forward with holding an informal get-together and knowledge share.

The Ohio IR Day will take place on October 24, 2014 at the State Library of Ohio Boardroom (274 E 1st Ave # 100, Columbus, OH 43201) from 10:00am-2:00pm.

The day will consist of introductions, Lightning Rounds, Birds of a Feather discussion, and a speaker from bepress on IRs.

We are currently soliciting ideas for the Lightning Rounds. We hope to have topics covered such as workflow, outreach, content types, assessment, scholarly communication, etc. If you would like to participate in the Lightning Rounds, please include your topic when registering and plan to speak for 5 minutes.

Instead of providing lunch, we ask you to bring your own or contribute $5.00 and we will pick up pizza and drinks.

Register here – Registration Form
Direction to State Library – http://library.ohio.gov/marketing/directions

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

We look forward to seeing you there!

-Jane, Elisabeth, and Andrew