Tag Archives: CORE Scholar

OhioLINK Subject Librarians Webinar: Researcher Services

Yesterday, I presented at the OhioLINK Subject Librarians Webinar: Researcher Services. The focus of my talk was the types of services an institutional repository can offer to undergrads with a research agenda. In preparation for this presentation, I took a hard look at the benefits undergrads can receive from posting in an IR, like CORE Scholar.

First, undergrads are able to include papers, presentations, posters, and data in our repository. By doing so, students are making their materials available to a worldwide audience. We are hopeful that this will help them while job hunting or applying to graduate school. Second, they have the opportunity to publish an article in an open access peer reviewed journal. Lastly, we are educating these users at an early stage of their careers about authors’ rights and open access.  These students are future faculty, scholars, and researchers. If we can get them to understand the importance of author’s rights and open access now, it will be normal practice for them to seek out open access journals, question publisher’s policies, and ask for rights to use their articles as they wish.

There are more benefits that we hope to offer undergrads as our IR develops. We are looking to include the ability to add Creative Commons licenses, use ORCID identifiers, and altmetrics. If you would like to learn more or get a copy of my presentation, please don’t hesitate to contact me (jane.wildermuth@wright.edu).

Digitizing the Wright Family Photograph Album

The Wright Brothers are among the most historical of Dayton families, and the interest in their legacy continues. For this reason we were asked by Special Collections and Archives to digitize and make available through CORE Scholar the Wright Family Album. Fortunately for Wright State, much of their history lies within the Libraries’ Special Collections and Archives, and the family album is no exception. The Wright Family album was begun circa 1880, and contains portraits of members and friends of the Wright family. The process of maintaining historical preservation of the album while digitizing is a delicate process.

wrightalbum_blog2As often the case, archived materials are very brittle. There was no question that the family album had to be shot in our camera room; such a historical piece can be both cumbersome to work with and very brittle in nature, due to the aging over time. Because of these factors, neither our Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner, or the Indus BookScanner 9000 were used during the digitization process. The capturing of the Wright album was done by our Nikon D200 SLR camera positioned on our Industria Fototecnica Firenze Super Repro copy stand, because of the flexibility it allows during the capturing process. The Wright Family album was shot using archival standard gloves and the album was positioned on the camera table using archival foam book cradles. Our camera table and copy stand allows us the convenience to suspend the Nikon overhead on a vertical beam in order to take pictures of our objects from above.  This gives us an even balanced image of the materials being captured. Along with our Nikon camera, there’s accompanying photo editing software called Camera Control Pro 2 with ViewNX 2 used to capture archival based raw files to be edited and stored. Once the family album was shot, the images were processed using Adobe Photoshop, allowing us to straighten and crop the images accordingly.wrightalbum_blog1

You can now view the newly shot Wright Family Photograph Album on, CORE Scholar.

The album itself contains 7 tintypes; which is essentially the primitive day version of a Polaroid. The process was taking a direct positive of a photograph, on a thin sheet of iron – commonly used during carnivals for quick takeaway pictures. You can view these tintypes within the Wright Album on our website, CORE Scholar.

For more information about Wright State University’s Institutional Repository please visit our website, CORE Scholar.

For more information about Special Collections and Archives and the Wright Brother’s Collection visit their website, Special Collections and Archives.

Visualizing Wright State’s Global Reach

 In late February of 2014, bepress released the newest iteration of Digital Commons 7.8. This new release instituted several new and exciting features for their institutional repositories. They added pagination options to their series collections, updated their taxonomy of disciplines, but the coolest and most immediately obvious feature is the Readership Activity Map.

readership activity map

CORE Scholar readership activity map

This map provides real-time data visualization of full-text downloads. What does that mean? Visitors to the site will be able to see real-world usage of CORE Scholar. This map helps illustrate the impact Wright State research has in the world at large. You might see downloads from Fairborn or Dayton, but you’re just as likely to see downloads in Dusseldorf, Germany or Pretoria, South Africa. Bepress has stated that eventually they would like to make this information available at the Collection and Journal levels, providing a much more granular experience. For the moment, you can view CORE Scholar’s Readership Activity Map at our website, CORE Scholar.

Remember to check back here for more interesting Institutional Repository, Scholarly Communications, and Digitization news, knowledge, and know-how.

To read more about Digital Commons’ Readership Activity Map on their blog post Pioneering a New Tool for Demonstrating Real-World Impact.

For more information about Wright State University’s Institutional Repository please visit our website CORE Scholar.