Flood Diaries: Sunday, March 30, 1913

The scene at J.G.C. Schenck's home on March 30 might have looked something like this (cropped from ms128_3-4-19).

The scene at J.G.C. Schenck’s home on March 30 might have looked something like this (cropped from ms128_3-4-19).

J. G. C. Schenck, Sr.

“Got two [men] to work at house shoveling out mud—8-1/2 hours at [40?] c. each per hr. They did good work. I caught terrible cold.”

 

Margaret Smell

“We take our departure from that doomed city and start for Muncie. Travel is both difficult and dangerous on account of the high waters and washed out bridges so we do not travel direct but go by way of Richmond over the Pennsylvania road. We are delayed at Richmond being Sunday the regular trains are not running but the kindness, friendship and tender sympathy which we found with the good people of the city of Richmond we shall never forget. We found the Depo [sic] draped in mourning from top to bottom for the poor unfortunate drowned ones. The ladies told us how earnestly and faithfully they worked to get us provisions to keep up our strength and sustain life to the sufferer’s. God will abundantly bless them for their generosity and kindness of heart, but we firmly trust they may never be forced to pass through the terrible ordeal as we did the awful Dayton flood disaster.

“Now the good people finding out the stress we were in made up a special train to convey us to Anderson over the panhandle road. There we caught the regular evening train to Muncie where we were received by glad happy hearts and open arms of our dear children.”

“This is just our own personal experience, briefly told of the Dayton flood of March 1913. But what of the terrors and suffering of thousands of others far less fortunate then we were. to say nothing of the awful terror suffered by those who lost their lives in the flood.

“After a week’s recuperation and rest we started out to visit relatives and friends. By so doing spent a very pleasant time there.

“Saturday, April 26 we returned to our Michigan home.”

 

Bishop Milton Wright

Men sitting near a curfew sign in Dayton just after the flood (cropped from ms128_3-8-25)

Men sitting near a curfew sign in Dayton just after the flood (cropped from ms128_3-8-25)

“Many did not come back, after quarentine [sic]. Only Harry, Corbett, & Mr. Tho. Costello, remained, and they worked at Harry’s house, all day. Katharine came. I wrote to Reuchlin. Curfew came before I mailed my letter. It is a bright day. Harry’s mother married Orange Harrison, who retired from M.E. itinerancy. Is practicing law. Has a cancer.”

This entry was posted in Collections, Local History and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>