Celebrate Preservation Week and Pass It On!

_pw16_bannerIt is Preservation Week!  Don’t miss out on two online webinars this week offered through the Association of Library Collections & Technical Services, which is a division of the American Library Association.

The first webinar is on Tuesday, April 26 and is titled “From Cassette to Cloud: Reformatting Audiotape.”  It will be presented by Krista White, Digital Humanities Librarian at the John Cotton Dana Library at Rutgers University-Newark.  Register at http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/042616 .

The second webinar is on Thursday, April 28 on “Preserving Your Digital Life” also presented by Krista White.  This webinar will discuss what steps can be taken now to ensure the best possibility of retaining important digital files.  Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7359264792756624897.

If you are not available this week, don’t worry!  Recordings of the webinars will be online in the future.  In fact, there is a host of useful preservation webinar recordings from past Preservation Week celebrations on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5BAB085DF728BD4.  You will find webinars on everything from preserving digital photos to taking care of family textiles.

You are also welcome to stop into Special Collections & Archives on the 4th floor of Dunbar Library and pick up a bookmark with preservation tips. We’d love to see you!

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Tom Hanks & David McCullough visit the Archives

As you might have heard, the Dayton area had some famous visitors earlier this week: actor/producer/director Tom Hanks and historian David McCullough.

Hanks helped dedicate the newly renovated Tom Hanks Center for Motion Pictures here at Wright State, and he is also the national co-chair of WSU’s Rise. Shine. fundraising campaign. Hanks’ film and television production company Playtone has also purchased the rights to David McCullough’s book The Wright Brothers, and an HBO miniseries is currently in the works.

As part of a busy schedule for both gentlemen during their time here in Dayton, Hanks and McCullough visited Special Collections & Archives yesterday morning for a private tour of our world-renowned Wright Brothers Collection, including viewing several recently digitized home movie films. McCullough’s long-time research assistant Mike Hill, as well as members of Hanks’ team for the HBO miniseries, including the screenwriter and another producer, were also in attendance for the tour.

Dawne Dewey, Head of Special Collections & Archives, hosted the tour, and Amanda Wright Lane, great-grandniece of the Wright Brothers, was present as well.

Dawne Dewey, Head of Special Collections & Archives, second from left, shares items from the Wright Brothers Collection with historian David McCullough (left), Tom Hanks, and Amanda Wright Lane, great-grandniece of the Wright Brothers. (Photo by university photographer Will Jones)

Dawne Dewey, Head of Special Collections & Archives, second from left, shares items from the Wright Brothers Collection with historian David McCullough (left), Tom Hanks, and Amanda Wright Lane, great-grandniece of the Wright Brothers. (Photo by university photographer Will Jones)

As you know, all visitors to the archives must sign in! We made a special sign-in sheet for our famous visitors.

Sign-in sheet for Tom Hanks, David McCullough, and Amanda Wright Lane, April 19, 2016

Sign-in sheet for Tom Hanks, David McCullough, and Amanda Wright Lane, April 19, 2016

After the visit, Special Collections & Archives staff and a small party of Public History graduate students enjoyed a luncheon with some of our guests, including David McCullough. After lunch, we took some photographs, including one of Dawne and Mr. McCullough pretending to “walk like the Wright Brothers” as shown in the famous photograph of the brothers taken at Belmont Park in 1910.

Dawne Dewey and David McCullough "walk like the Wright Brothers," April 19, 2016.

Dawne Dewey and David McCullough “walk like the Wright Brothers,” April 19, 2016.

This has been a great week for Dayton, Wright State University, and the legacy of the Wright Brothers, and we were so excited, proud, and honored to have been a part of it!

*****

For more complete coverage of Hanks’ and McCullough’s visit to Dayton this week, please see all of this wonderful news media publicity:

More on David McCullough’s earlier visits to our Archives:

And finally, a great “found it in the archives” on Tom Hanks’ first performance at WSU in 1978, which he mentioned in his dedication speech yesterday.

Official university photographs from these exciting events will soon be available on the Wright State University Smugmug site.

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Raoul Lufbery and the Escadrille Lafayette

In early 1916, although the United States had not yet entered World War I, there were a number of Americans eager to support the Allies however they could. One response to that eagerness was the establishment of the Escadrille Americaine by the French government on March 21, 1916. The Escadrille Americaine was a a French flying squadron largely composed of American volunteer fighter pilots. The unit was first sent into service on the front lines at Luxeuil-les-Bains (near Switzerland) on April 20, 1916.

The Escadrille Americaine was later renamed the Escadrille Lafayette (sometimes inverted to “Lafayette Escadrille” in English) in December 1916, after the Marquis de Lafayette, a hero of the American and French revolutions.

Members of the Escadrille Lafayette, along with their mascots, lions named Whiskey and Soda (from MS-502 Raoul Lufbery Collection)

Members of the Escadrille Lafayette, along with their mascots, lions named Whiskey and Soda (from MS-502 Raoul Lufbery Collection)

One of the more well-known members of this Escadrille was Raoul Lufbery, a French-born American citizen and World War I flying ace.

Portrait of Raoul Lufbery, June 1917 (from MS-502 Raoul Lufbery Collection)

Portrait of Raoul Lufbery, June 1917 (from MS-502 Raoul Lufbery Collection)

Born Gervais Raoul Lufbery on March 14, 1885, in Chamalières, Puy-de-Dôme, France, Lufbery immigrated to the United States about 1904. He became an American citizen and served briefly in the U.S. Army. Lufbery would joined the Foreign Legion as a mechanic at the beginning of World War I, later receiving his pilot wings in 1914.

In May 1916, Lufbery was assigned to the recently-formed Escadrille Americaine. He was later reassigned to the United States Air Service, after American entry into WWI in 1917.

Lufbery was a very successful ace pilot, shooting down at least 17 German planes. Unfortunately, this success and glory was short-lived.

On May 19, 1918, with enemy planes coming closer to the airfield for the 94th Pursuit Squadron, Lufbery rushed into the air without performing his usual pre-flight check. Soon his plane took a direct hit from the enemy. In order to escape the burning plane, Lufbery jumped out and was impaled on a fence post, dying instantly. Lufbery received full military honors at his funeral and is interred at the Lafayette Memorial du Parc de Garches, the shrine honoring the Escadrille Lafayette, just outside Paris, France.

Newspaper headline announcing Lufbery's death, May 1918 (from MS-502 Raoul Lufbery Collection)

Newspaper headline announcing Lufbery’s death, May 1918 (from MS-502 Raoul Lufbery Collection)

Special Collections & Archives recently acquired the Raoul Lufbery Collection (MS-502), donated by Raoul’s sister Germaine Fox Lufbery. The collection has now been processed and is available for research. It contains primarily documents pertaining to the World War I flying missions and the untimely death of Raoul Lufbery, including newspaper clippings, magazine articles, photographs, and other prints.

A selection of materials from the Raoul Lufbery Collection can be seen below:

Variety of materials from the Raoul Lufbery Collection (MS-502)

Variety of materials from the Raoul Lufbery Collection (MS-502)

Additional resources:

(Portions the above biographical sketch were adapted from the original collection finding aid, written by Nina Herzog.)

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