Flat World Knowledge releases Make It Your Own platform

Reprinted in full from Information Today NewsBreaks, by Paula Hane.

Flat World Knowledge, a publisher of free and open college textbooks for students, announced the release of a new platform called MIYO (Make It Your Own). The fully-automated system gives professors greater control over textbook content, and the ability, with one click, to make their modified book available to students free online or in multiple, low-cost digital and print formats.

MIYO (mee-oh) transforms a static textbook into an adaptable learning platform by combining a digital-first architecture with Flat World’s open licensing model that grants faculty the right to revise, remix and share its textbooks. The new system uses familiar drag-and-drop and click features that allow instructors to easily move or delete chapters and sections; upload Word and PDF documents; add notes and exercises; insert video and hyperlinks; edit sentences; and incorporate other content that is free to reuse under a Creative Commons open license. Continue reading

Credo Reference adds Salem Press Collection

From a Credo Reference press release:  Credo Reference, the award-winning online reference service, is pleased to announce the launch of an in-depth new Publisher Collection from Salem Press.

Joining a growing list of 33 other Publisher Collections, all available stand-alone or alongside a subscription to Credo General Reference, the new Salem Press Collection will be offered as perpetual purchase or on a subscription basis.

This new Collection features key titles from both the Critical Surveys of Literature series (guides covering the major writers of world literature) and the Great Lives from History series (detailing the biographies of important people throughout history). Filled with vital content, and including 54 volumes from 13 titles, the Salem Press Publisher Collection offers: Continue reading

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading

University of Michigan Library opens ECCO – Eighteenth Century Collections Online to the public

The University of Michigan Library is opening to the public 2,229 searchable keyed-text editions of books from Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO).  The texts are available to the public at no cost.

ECCO is a research database containing significant English- and foreign-language titles printed in the United Kingdom during the 18th century and important works from the America The database is published by Gale, part of Cengage Learning.

The texts typed by the Text Creation Partnership, range from Pope’s “Essay on Man” to a “Discourse addressed to an Infidel Mathematician.”  The Text Creation Partnership (TCP) produced the keyed texts in collaboration with Gale, which provided page images for keying and is permitting the release of the keyed texts in support of the Library’s commitment to the creation of open access cultural heritage archives. Continue reading