Apabi’s simplified Chinese eBooks now indexed in EBSCO Discovery Service

IPSWICH, Mass. — July 31, 2012 —EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO) and Apabi have come to an agreement allowing metadata from Apabi’s e-book collection to be added to the Base Index of EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS). The e-books from Apabi are designed to offer a vast collection in a variety of subject areas to researchers in higher education, public libraries, corporations and government.

Apabi’s extensive and growing collection includes over 700,000 Simplified Chinese e-books, with coverage beginning as early as 1949. Over 120,000 e-books are being added to the collection each year. The majority of Apabi’s e-books, more than 400,000, are published from 2004 to the present. Subject matter within the e-book collection represents an expansive range of subject areas including humanities, literature, science & technology and economics.

EBSCO Publishing has continually worked to increase global content in EBSCO Discovery Service and the addition of Apabi’s metadata to the EDS Base Index significantly expands the global reach and will serve as a unique and valuable resource for EDS users.

Apabi is part of a growing list of publishers and other content partners that are taking part in EDS to bring more visibility to their content. Partners include the world’s largest scholarly journal & book publishers including Elsevier, Wiley Blackwell, Springer Science & Business Media, Taylor & Francis Informa, Sage Publications, and thousands of others. Partners also include content providers, such as LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters (Web of Science), JSTOR, ARTstor, Credo Reference, World Book, ABC-CLIO, and many others.

The EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) Base Index represents content from approximately 20,000 providers (and growing), which accounts for more than 350,000 publications from the world’s top publishers and information providers. However, because EDS is a custom solution, the complete index to materials for any given customer may be expanded greatly beyond the coverage referenced for the Base Index. In terms of depth of coverage for publications in the EBSCO Discovery Service Base Index, content extends back to the 15th century, and in some cases, even earlier. The inclusion of custom catalogs, repositories and other resources may certainly further extend the dates of archival coverage for a given institution.

EBSCO Discovery Service creates a unified, customized index of an institution’s information resources, and an easy, yet powerful means ofaccessing all of that content from a single search box—searching made even more powerful because of the quality of metadata and depth and breadth of coverage.

EBSCO Discovery Serviceis quickly becoming the discovery selection for many libraries (www.ebscohost.com/discovery/eds-news), and an obvious partner for content providers. Because the service builds on the foundation provided by the EBSCOhost® platform, libraries gain a full user experience for discovering their collections/OPAC—which is not typical in the discovery space. Further still, in the many universities and other libraries where EBSCOhost is the most-used platform for premium research, users are not asked to change their pathways or habits for searching. There’s simply more to discover on the familiar EBSCOhost platform, and the same can be said for library administrators who can leverage their previous work with EBSCOadmin.