About

No Shelf Required® is a blog about eBooks, loosely defined to discuss eBooks, audio books, and other digital content found in libraries as well as the technology needed to read and listen to this digital content.  Electronic reference interfaces are another popular topic of conversation.  The blog is designed to inform librarians and publishers of the happenings in the industry, from a variety of perspectives, and give them an opportunity to discuss eBook issues.   All are encouraged to participate in the discussion through commenting and posting via the moderator, Sue Polanka from Wright State University Libraries.  The discussion will focus on the issues, concepts, current and future practices of Ebook publishing including: finding, selecting, licensing, policies, business models, use (tracking), best practices, ebook readers, and promotion/marketing.  I hope you find the blog a valuable resource.  Your comments and suggestions are welcome.

Founder – Sue Polanka, Head of Reference/Instruction, Wright State University Libraries and Editor of ALA Editions, No Shelf Required: Ebooks in Libraries, 2010.

Contributing Writer/Editor – Mirela Roncevic

History:

February, 2008 – first blog post on SAGE Reference Online posted in the old home of NSR on blogspot

May, 2008 -NSR moves to new home on WordPress, hosted by Wright State University Libraries

February, 2010 – @spolanka finally starts Tweeting, all NSR posts are posted to Twitter

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May, 2010 – NSR wins the Salem Press Library Blog Awards – 1st Place, Academic Category

 

July, 2010 – NSR offers mirror sites on www.noshelfrequired.com, .net, and .org

August, 2010 – No Shelf Required: E-books in Libraries, edited by Sue Polanka, is published by ALA Editions

January, 2011 – No Shelf Required® receives trademark from USPTO

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March, 2011 – Sue Polanka wins Library Journal 2011 Movers & Shakers award for her work with eBooks and No Shelf Required

 

March, 2011 – Sue Polanka is Against The Grain’s Star of the Week

August, 2011 – E-Reference Context and Discoverability in Libraries, edited by Sue Polanka, published by IGI.  This is the first in the IGI Advances in Library and Information Science Series

December, 2011 – The November/December Library Technology Reports edited by Sue Polanka, The No Shelf Required Guide to E-book Purchasing, published by ALA.

January, 2012 – No Shelf Required II:  The Use and Management of E-Books, edited by Sue Polanka published by ALA Editions

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June, 2012 – No Shelf Required receives Honorable Mention in the 2012 Salem Press Library Blog Awards

October, 2012 – Mirela Roncevic joins NSR as a contributing writer and editor.

May, 2013 – Sue Polanka awarded Kent State University Alumnus of the Year for 2013 for her contributions to the profession through the NSR blog, books, and events.

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June, 2013 – eContent Quarterly, edited by Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic, launches from ALA TechSource

7 Comments

7 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Hal Stevens // Nov 20, 2008 at 9:37 pm

    Hi, I need some advice please. I have several websites that have free services dedicated to end-of-life issues (funeral planning, organ donation, buying/selling cemetery plots…and soon to be published green funerals/green burials, cremation, eulogy). On those websites we sell ebooks that I have written and that my company CemeterySpot publishes. These ebooks also appear on websites dedicated to to selling each individual ebook. I have been told that to increase exposure and sales I should have my ebooks listed with an aggregator or on a website that specifically sells ebooks. How do I find the best ebook aggregators that will work with a new author/publisher? Once I find these aggregators what is the process (and costs) of having my titles listed and sold through these aggregators? Can I work with several aggregators simultaneously? Is it adviseable to do so? HELP! Thanks, Hal.

  • 2 spolanka // Nov 21, 2008 at 10:04 am

    If anyone has additional information to share, please do. Here is how I responded to Hal.

    Thanks for your comment. I hope you found the blog helpful. Your situation is a bit complicated so I’ll try to highlight some things below. Keep in mind, what I’m saying is based on what I know, not facts from vendors.

    The biggest problem will be getting an aggregator to work with a new author/publisher. Most do not. You typically get represented by a publisher first, then the publisher works with the aggregator. That being said, it never hurts to try.

    I’d start with public library aggregators – NetLibrary, Overdrive, Ingram Digital. Articles highlighting each of these companies are linked on the blog- articles page. “The New NetLibrary” and “eBook Distributors for the Public and School Library.”

    Data in xml and oed is best. pdf will cost you more. “cost” is usually a % of the list price. 35-50% based on your title list.

    You might try amazon or funeralhome.net as alternatives.

  • 3 phim online // Feb 7, 2009 at 2:54 am

    Very informative, very good… – sincerely, phim online.

    good job guys/gals.

  • 4 Thad McIlroy, The Future of Publishing // Feb 23, 2011 at 7:15 am

    From my blog:
    Shh! eBooks and the Quiet Conspiracy against Public Libraries

    http://bit.ly/ewWxAS

  • 5 Robin Neidorf // Feb 23, 2011 at 2:44 pm

    I’d like to correct an item you posted on February 19:

    http://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/?p=1999

    Please note ResourceShelf has not become InfoDocket, as you reported. Rather, Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy have left their roles as contributors to ResourceShelf to launch InfoDocket.

    ResourceShelf continues to publish, as it has for 10 years, at http://www.resourceshelf.com/ and is part of the FreePint Family (http://www.freepint.com).

    Please make this correction. I can be reached at robin.neidorf@freepint.com if you have questions.

  • 6 B. Young // May 16, 2013 at 4:16 pm

    I am writing a grant for iPad Minis for our library. My principal has already committed funding to purchase eBooks for our K-6 library. In my grant request, I would like to include statistics and research that shows the benefit of using eBooks with reluctant readers. The deadline for the grant is in 2 weeks and we just found out about the opportunity so are scrambling to put this together. Do you know of any great research articles or statistics I can use and cite in my grant request? I’m looking for things like eBooks increasing the number of books or how often a student reads, change in attitude toward reading, etc. Thanks!

  • 7 spolanka // May 16, 2013 at 4:39 pm

    I’ve used some materials from the Joan Ganz Cooney Center for reference. Also, Kathy Parker wrote a chapter in No Shelf Required 2: Use and management of Electronic books about using ebooks with reluctant readers.

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