Category Archives: Advocacy Groups

IFLA launches principles, research and advice for eLending in Libraries

Picked this up from the ALA Council listserv:

IFLA is pleased to launch a new set of resources relating to eBooks and libraries. Providing access to eBooks is one of the most pressing issues facing libraries right now. Public libraries, in particular, are dealing with implications of rapidly changing business and access models. IFLA has previously issued a background paper on eLending during 2012, and is now building on this paper to launch a new official policy document ‘IFLA Principles for Library eLending‘ which was endorsed by the Governing Board in February 2013. Continue reading

ALA launches e-book media & communications toolkit

From an ALA Press Release on November 27, 2012

 As several large book publishers continue to deny libraries access to their e-books, and others make e-books available under difficult terms, libraries find themselves unable to provide the reading and educational materials demanded by their patrons. As a result, many librarians are asking, “What can I do to advocate for fair e-book lending practices?”

To assist libraries in informing the public about e-book lending practices, the American Library Association (ALA) released today the “ALA E-book Media & Communications Toolkit,” a set of materials that will support librarians in taking action in their communities.

Developed by the ALA’s Digital Content and Libraries Working Group (DCWG), the toolkit includes op-ed and press release templates for library supporters interested in informing the public of the role that libraries play in building literate and knowledgeable communities. Additionally, the toolkit provides guidance on ways to use the media templates, as well as ALA talking points, e-book data, and public service announcement scripts.

Continue reading

ALA meets with publishers in NYC, a summary

The e-content blog at American Libraries has a nice summary about the ALA/publisher meetings in New York. Not only does it summarize the meetings, but provides links to many other valuable resources concerning eBooks, public libraries, and pricing.

http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/e-content/focus-future-two-days-publisher-meetings-new-york-city

An open letter to America’s publishers from ALA President Maureen Sullivan

An open letter to America’s publishers from ALA President Maureen Sullivan

September 24, 2012, CHICAGO — The following open letter was released by American Library Association (ALA) President Maureen Sullivan regarding Simon & Schuster, Macmillan, and Penguin refusal to provide access to their e-books in U.S. libraries.

The open letter states:

It’s a rare thing in a free market when a customer is refused the ability to buy a company’s product and is told its money is “no good here.” Surprisingly, after centuries of enthusiastically supporting publishers’ products, libraries find themselves in just that position with purchasing e-books from three of the largest publishers in the world. Simon & Schuster, Macmillan, and Penguin have been denying access to their e-books for our nation’s 112,000 libraries and roughly 169 million public library users.

Let’s be clear on what this means: If our libraries’ digital bookshelves mirrored the New York Times fiction best-seller list, we would be missing half of our collection any given week due to these publishers’ policies. The popular “Bared to You” and “The Glass Castle” are not available in libraries because libraries cannot purchase them at any price. Today’s teens also will not find the digital copy of Judy Blume’s seminal “Forever,” nor today’s blockbuster “Hunger Games” series. Continue reading

Life with E-Books

Andrew Richard Albanese from Publisher’s Weekly wrote a very nice article about life with eBooks in public libraries.  I have clipped a couple of paragraphs below.  The fulltext is available on the Publisher’s Weekly site.

Begin clip:

Discussions between libraries and the big six publishers over e-book lending have grabbed headlines in 2012, but despite cordial statements from each side about the benefits of communication, a report released this month from the American Library Association suggests the two sides remain far from a breakthrough.

“Mixed” is how Robert Wolven, associate university librarian at Columbia University, and co-chair of the ALA’s Digital Content Working Group, describes the state of affairs between libraries and publishers. “I think the discussions we’ve had demonstrate that we’re not at an impasse,” Wolven tells PW. “There are potential paths for exploration and for improving things. But there’s still a lot of work to be done.” Continue reading

IMLS grant awarded to OCLC to study challenges PL face in providing eBook content

From an OCLC press release:

DUBLIN, Ohio, July 10, 2012—The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded a $99,957 grant to OCLC for a new initiative, “The Big Shift: Advancing Public Library Participation in Our Digital Future.” The purpose of the grant is to more fully understand the challenges that U.S. public libraries face in providing e-book content to borrowers, as they ensure that all Americans continue to have access to commercially produced content through their local public libraries, even as formats change.

OCLC will partner with the American Library Association (ALA) and the Public Library Association (PLA) to review the e-book landscape and jointly develop recommendations for managing the e-book environment, in order to ensure adequate public access to these emerging resources. Continue reading

Libraries Thriving Collaborative Space – an interview with Laura Warren of Credo Reference

Libraries Thriving is a Collaborative Space for e-Resource Innovation and Information Literacy Promotion. Thinking and doing.  I had the chance to speak with Laura Warren, Solutions Associate for Credo Reference (a supporter of Libraries Thriving) about the program.  Our interview is now available on the NSR interviews page.

Here is more information about Libraries Thriving:

With low usage and shrinking budgets, libraries are challenged to justify resource investments now more than ever.  At the same time, information users are ill prepared to navigate the amount and quality of content on the web.  This creates a tremendous opportunity for libraries to show that they are well equipped to help users navigate information resources and for users to benefit from this guidance. Continue reading

Unglue.it celebrates the first successful campaign

Congrats to everyone at Unglue.it for the first successful campaign.  Here is the official press release:

Two hundred and fifty-nine supporters pledged a total of $7,578 to a campaign to “unglue” Ruth Finnegan’s 1970 classic, “Oral Literature in Africa”. The campaign, which lasted 33 days, topped the campaign’s target at 12:30AM EDT on June 20 with a little under two days to spare. As a result the book will be issued as an ebook with a Creative Commons Attribution license, opening it up to free use and reuse by scholars and readers around the world.

Unglue.it, the website that hosted the campaign, launched on May 17th with the goal of “giving ebooks to the world”.  Unglue.it allows rights holders of already published books to present “ungluing campaigns”. Site members can then pledge towards making the book available as Creative Commons licensed ebooks. If the campaign meets its goal, the ebook becomes freely available to everyone. Continue reading

Unglue.it looking to finish it’s first campaign

Have you heard of Unglue.it?  If not, read on… Unglue.it is a a place for individuals and institutions to join together to give their favorite ebooks to the world. We work with rights holders to decide on fair compensation for releasing a free, legal edition of their already-published books, under Creative Commons licensing. Then everyone pledges toward that sum. When the threshold is reached (and not before), we collect the pledged funds and we pay the rights holders. They issue an unglued digital edition; you’re free to read and share it, with everyone, on the device of your choice, worldwide.

Their first campaign has less than one week to go.

We’re up to 65% of the goal with just under 1 week to go!

The campaign for Oral Literature in Africa closes next Thursday.  With the support of ungluers like you, it’s already over $4,900, almost two-thirds of its goal — but it needs more pledges and publicity to reach $7,500 before midnight EDT on June 21. Continue reading