Category Archives: Articles of Interest

New OCLC report: At a Tipping Point: Education, Learning and Libraries

The report is available for download at http://oc.lc/TippingPoint.

Interesting phrases from the report:

  • The brand perception of libraries remains firmly planted in tradition. Libraries = books.
  • Inconvenient = irrelevant.  Out of sight, out of mind.  On my mobile, on my mind.
  • The library just “didn’t come to mind” for the majority of online learners.
  • A new future is coming to education—and libraries. The sparks are visible. It’s time to act.
  • Students, parents and online learners see library spaces as convenient places to work. They value online access to materials. They say that libraries provide the tools to get work done and offer relevant, current information.
  • Putting library convenience center stage will increase library relevance.

Full Press release below. Continue reading

Book Snatching, the most violent act in the history of reading

Yoav Lorch, Founder and CEO of Total Boox, Ltd. sent me this story he wrote about snatching ebooks.  I think it’s a clever tale showing us the sad state of ebook borrowing in many of our libraries.  He gave me permission to post it here.

Book Snatching

Or

Clearly the most violent act in the history of reading

by Yoav Lorch, Founder and CEO, Total Boox Ltd.

Its 5:20 PM. My wife should be home in about half an hour. I promised I’d do the dishes and have the place looking decent when she returns. I have 47 pages to go with my book, and I’m dying to complete it. Yes, I can complete it before it expires and evaporates from my device at 5:46, but then, the dishes. The sink looks like a railroad crash on a rainy day. Continue reading

ATG issue features articles on ebooks for academic librarians

The December 2013/January 2014 issue of Against The Grain features six feature articles and one opinion piece on ebooks in academic libraries.  The issue, eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians, was guest edited by Audrey Powers.

Here is the Table of Contents (note you must be a subscriber to read the full-text):

  • eBook Platforms for Academic Libraries by Audrey Powers
  • eBook Lending Platforms  by John Novak
  • eBook Aggregators: A Primer by Deborah Lenares
  • Commercial Publisher eBook Platforms  by Cris Ferguson
  • University Press eBook Platforms:  A Brief Overview  by Mark Johnson
  • Op Ed: Inadvertent Innovation by Joe Esposito

New OCLC Research report provides evidence base for shift to shared print management approach

DUBLIN, Ohio, January 23, 2014—OCLC Research has released a new report, “Understanding the Collective Collection: Towards a System-wide Perspective on Library Print Collections,” which establishes evidence that has allowed and encouraged libraries to begin the shift from local provisioning of library collections and services to increased reliance on cooperative infrastructure, collective collections, shared technology platforms, and “above-the-institution” management strategies.

“Understanding the Collective Collection” collects important work OCLC Research has done for the community in recent years in providing a quantitative, analytic, system-wide view of library collections. It provides critical context for the policy, service and strategy questions raised by shared print discussions in the library community. Continue reading

50% of American adults own eReader or tablet says new Pew report

Pew Internet Research released a new report yesterday on eReaders and eReading.  The report, “E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps” reports an increase in device ownership and eReading among Americans.

Some highlights:

  • 50% of American adults own either an eReader or tablet device
  • eReaders and tablet devices used for reading ebooks nearly twice as much as computers and cell phones
  • Reading eBooks on tablet devices has increased from 23% to 55% in 3 years

Much, much more available in the full report.

SAGE white paper explores discoverability of scholarly content, recommends standards, transparency, metadata, and partnerships

Los Angeles, CA (January 16, 2014)   In a changing academic environment, discoverability of scholarly content demands cooperative efforts across the communications supply chain. A new SAGE white paper, out today, summarizes the current discovery landscape for scholarly communications, advocates for cooperative efforts across the industry, and proposes specific recommendations for discoverability improvement for librarians, publishers, and service providers.

“This white paper draws upon novel insights contributed by international experts about the scholarly ecosystem of publisher content, research tools, and library systems. The experts make predictions about new cross-sector partnerships as researcher workflows evolve,” stated lead author Mary Somerville. “Our recommendations advance the common goal of furthering discovery, access, and usage of scholarly publications and creative work.” Continue reading

Google Books prevails, lawsuit dismissed

Google Books prevails and the lawsuit is dismissed.

Quote from the Authors Guild v Google – Summary Judgment Decision (Case 1:05-cv-08136-DC Document 1088 Filed 11/14/13):

In my view, Google Books provides significant public benefits. It advances the progress of the arts and sciences,
while maintaining respectful consideration for the rights of authors and other creative individuals, and without adversely
impacting the rights of copyright holders. It has become an invaluable research tool that permits students, teachers,
librarians, and others to more efficiently identify and locate books. It has given scholars the ability, for the first time, to
conduct full-text searches of tens of millions of books. It preserves books, in particular out-of-print and old books that
have been forgotten in the bowels of libraries, and it gives them new life. It facilitates access to books for print-disabled and
remote or underserved populations. It generates new audiences and creates new sources of income for authors and publishers.
Indeed, all society benefits…       Denny Chin, U.S. Circuit Judge

See also:

Reuters – Google prevails over authors in book-scanning U.S. lawsuit

GigaOM – Google wins book-scanning case:  Judge finds fair-use, cites many benefits

DPLAfest highlights

The DPLA just emailed out these links, summarizing events held last month.

On October 24-25, we held our first DPLAfest—two days of vibrant discussions  and workshops that brought together hundreds of ibrarians, archivists, museum professionals, developers, technologists, publishers, authors, teachers, students and other participants from across the country. Since then we’ve published a short series of blog posts highlighting some of the key events, workshops, and conversations coming out of the fest. You can find links to these DPLAfest roundup posts below.

Do not turn off your electronic devices, keep on reading

eBook lovers  – read on.

FAA green-lights gadget use during entire flight (CNet)
Can I use my e-book reader/tablet/cell phone throughout my flight now?  from the FAA’s FAQ

Once your airline has shown the FAA its airplanes can safely handle radio interference from portable electronics, they can let you use your devices in airplane mode only most of the time. At certain times — for example, a landing in reduced visibility — the Captain may tell passengers to turn off their devices to make absolutely sure they don’t interfere with onboard communications and navigation equipment.

eContent Quarterly launches

ECQ_001_300

No Shelf Required is extremely pleased to announce the launch of eContent Quarterly, a new journal from American Library Association’s TechSource, edited by Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic. The free issue of the journal was released at this year’s ALA conference in Chicago. Issue 1 is now available in PDF, ePub, and Mobi formats on ALA TechSource’s web site. Regularly priced at $150, a one-year subscriptionis now $99 with the coupon code SECQ13.

eContent Quarterly will offer practical, user-driven solutions and ideas for curating, developing, integrating, and managing content in rapidly-changing digital library environments.  Polanka and Roncevic, whose deep knowledge of the e-content landscape and vast library and editorial experience combine to bring clarity and focus to the journal’s purpose: helping information professionals keep pace with e-book and journal platforms, databases, multi-media products, digital solutions and discovery services.

Written by and for information professionals in the business of producing, selling and buying e-content—including librarians and publishers—each issue will consist of in-depth articles that explore the many facets of electronic content.

Below is the listing of Issue 1′s four main articles, in the order in which they appear in the journal. Below those is the full Editors’ Note from the same issue, in which editors Polanka and Roncevic summarize the overarching theme of the first issue: the importance of partnerships. “Whatever aspect of e-content we may be discussing—building e-book collections in academic libraries; navigating formats; using and creating metadata, or evaluating children’s apps—we are bound to reach similar conclusions about the pressing need to cooperate rather than to quarrel. The reality is: librarians and those that cater to them have a lot more in common than they may realize.”

Issue 1, Fall 2013 Contents:

  • Supplying and Collecting Books: An Uneasy Metamorphosis by Michael Zeoli
    Drawing on his vast experience as a content developer, Zeoli gives an insider’s view on the complex nature of publisher-aggregator-library
    relationships, calling for less isolationism and more partnerships among all parties.
  • E-book Formats: An Overview for Librarians by John Burns
    Dixie State University’s gadget-loving librarian explains the pros and cons of e-book formats as they relate to libraries.
  • The Importance of Metadata for E-content by Renée Register
    The founder of DataCurate.com provides an introductory text on what metadata is; how it is used by publishers, aggregators, and libraries; and the challenges the e-book industry faces as it moves forward with two systems of metadata, ONIX and MARC.
  • Evaluating Children’s Apps by Carisa KIuver and Cen Campbell
    The founders of Digital Storytime and Little eLit, respectively, tell the stories of how they created the two sites to help guide librarians and parents through the complex universe of children’s apps.

Continue reading