Category Archives: Articles of Interest

Springer releases white paper on eBook use and acceptance in an undergraduate institution

Springer has released a White Paper on ebook use and attitudes.  The study was conducted at Wellesley College.  Deborah Lenares of the Margaret Clapp Library at Wellesley College, and Steven Smith, formerly of Wellesley College and now Head of Collection Management at Boston University Libraries co-authored the white paper.

More information, including key findings and links to the full paper, is below:

A new white paper from Springer examines eBook adoption at an undergraduate institution

Conventional wisdom holds that the availability of eBooks and their inherent utility – full text searchability, ease of access, etc. – are what drive use and acceptance. But are these the only factors behind the rate of adoption of eBooks at undergraduate universities? A new Springer white paper by Deborah Lenares of the Margaret Clapp Library at Wellesley College, and Steven Smith, formerly of Wellesley College and now Head of Collection Management at Boston University Libraries, draws on past studies and a new survey of users at Wellesley College to uncover some interesting insights for undergraduate librarians and institutions. The white paper is available both online, and will be distributed at this year’s Electronic Resources and Libraries (ER & L) Conference in Austin, TX. Continue reading

IFLA launches principles, research and advice for eLending in Libraries

Picked this up from the ALA Council listserv:

IFLA is pleased to launch a new set of resources relating to eBooks and libraries. Providing access to eBooks is one of the most pressing issues facing libraries right now. Public libraries, in particular, are dealing with implications of rapidly changing business and access models. IFLA has previously issued a background paper on eLending during 2012, and is now building on this paper to launch a new official policy document ‘IFLA Principles for Library eLending‘ which was endorsed by the Governing Board in February 2013. Continue reading

HathiTrust settlement, fair use protected – articles of interest

Wednesday, Judge Harold Baer Jr. of the Southern District of New York issued a judgement in the “HathiTrust” lawsuit.  Below are several links to articles and blog posts on the topic.  The full text of the legal opinion is also linked below.

Opinion

The Laboratorium blog post:  HathiTrust Wins

The Michigan Daily:  U wins copyright lawsuit against HathiTrust Digitalization Project

Wired Magazine:  Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project

Digital Shift:  HathiTrust Ruled Fair Use

Court Rules on HathiTrust and Fair Use – Columbia University Libraries

A Big Win for Fair Use and libraries – Kevin Smith, Duke University Libraries

Scholarly eBooks: Understanding the ROI for Libraries, a Springer White Paper

Springer, in collaboration with PCG (Publishers Communication Group) released a white paper, Scholarly eBooks: Understanding the Return on Investment for Libraries, today.  It is available for a free download from the Springer site.

The following is the introduction:  The Return on Investment (RoI) of scholarly eBooks in research and academic libraries can be difficult to determine, as the factors considered can vary from library to library, or even from person to person. RoI can be defined as a performance measure used to quantify and evaluate the efficiency of an investment in library resources or to compare efficiency among different investments. While it may seem simply to be a question of money in versus money out, the real difficulty of expressing the overall value of this resource for an institution comes from many contributing factors:

  • Time saved by library staff and researchers
  • Convenience of constant access and online search capabilities
  • Effect on research output and teaching
  • Physical space saved in the library by using electronic resources Continue reading

ALA OITP releases backgrounder document on eBooks and libraries

reprinted from the District Dispatch:

As part of the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy’s work with the Digital Content and Libraries Working Group, several member leaders have requested we develop and distribute communications resources that will support local libraries around digital content issues.

Today OITP released the first of these documents, a backgrounder (pdf) that shares some highlights from the newest Pew Research Center report on “Libraries, Patrons, and E-books,” along with some possible messaging and local angles for leveraging this new research with local media and decision makers.

Among the report’s key findings referenced in the backgrounder:

  • 12% of e-book readers have borrowed an e-book from their library
  • 62% of people don’t know they can borrow e-books from their library
  • 69% of people report the library is important to them and their family
  • Many people would like to learn more about borrowing e-books
  • E-book borrowers appreciate the selection of e-books at their local library, but they often encounter difficulty borrowing Continue reading

SAGE and LISU report on demonstrating library value released

SAGE released the results of a six month research project on demonstrating library value.  More below from the press release.

Los Angeles, CA (18 June, 2012) – Providing evidence of value remains an elusive goal for academic libraries across geographic borders, according to a new report published today.  The findings are the results of a six-month research project commissioned by SAGE, which sets out recommendations for academic libraries to enhance their working relationship with academic teaching and research staff. ‘Working together: evolving value for academic libraries’ was undertaken by LISU, a national research and information centre based in the Department of Information Science at Loughborough University (UK).

Findings from three geographic areas, the United States, United Kingdom and Scandinavia, indicated that there is no systematic evidence of the value of academic libraries for teaching and research staff. Despite this, librarians noted that they receive positive feedback about the support the library provides, but there is a perception that academic staff do not really know how to use all that the library can offer. Continue reading

Self Publishing fuels steady title growth in 2011

From a Bowker press release.  Lots of interesting data here about title output from 2011.

June 5, 2012 (New Providence, NJ) — Bowker, the global leader in bibliographic information, released its annual report on U. S. print book publishing for 2011, compiled from its Books In Print® database. Based on preliminary figures from U.S. publishers, Bowker is projecting that traditional print book output grew six percent in 2011, from 328,259 titles in 2010 to a projected 347,178 in 2011, driven almost exclusively by a strong self-publishing market. This is the most significant expansion in more than four years for America’s traditional publishing sector, but removing self-publishing from the equation would show that the market is relatively flat from 2010.

“Transformation of our industry has brought on a time of rich innovation in the publishing models we now have today. What was once relegated to the outskirts of our industry—and even took on demeaning names like ‘vanity press’ is now not only a viable alternative but what is driving the title growth of our industry today,” said Kelly Gallagher, Vice-President, Bowker Market Research. “From that standpoint, self-publishing is a true legitimate power to be reckoned with. Coupled with the explosive growth of e-books and digital content – these two forces are moving the industry in dramatic ways.” Continue reading

ALA releases E-Content: The Digital Dialogue

Available online now!
E-Content: The Digital Dialogue

This digital supplement addresses critical issues related to ebooks, e-content, digital literacy, and more! You can read it online or pick up one of a limited supply of print copies at the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim—pick yours up at Office for Information Technology Policy programs and in the ALA Membership Pavilion.

American Libraries Digital Supplement

What you’ll find inside:

  • ALA´s Digital Content and Libraries Working Group cochairs, Sari Feldman and Robert Wolven,summarize recent ebook activities and suggest directions for the future.
  • Deborah Caldwell-Stone from the Office for Intellectual Freedom focuses on ebook privacy and related ethical issues.
  • James LaRue offers perspectives from a reader, librarian, publisher, writer, and bookseller on ebooks today and tomorrow.

You can read this supplement in the easy-to-use Zmag web browser format, or download it as a PDF for offline reading. Click here to get started.

Articles of Interest

E-Books Drive Revenue Growth Across Book Trade in January 2012 – Digital Book World

JK Rowling’s Pottermore Breaks eBook Lockdown, Might Change eBooks Forever – Huffington Post

LG Begins Mass Production of first flexible , plastic eInk displays – Extreme Tech

An Academic Spring – American Libraries

A Look at Students using eTextbooks (Infographic) – eBOOKNEWSER

Bringing up a Young Reader on E-Books – New York Times

Will Hatchette Be The First Big-6 Publisher toDrop DRM on E-books? – paidcontent.org

Going Digital Does Not Lower Textbook Prices – Inside Higher Education

Articles of Interest: Pottermore version

Great reads today about the launch of e-book sales from Pottermore.

Pottermore Shop (for ebooks, U.S. site)

Announcements:  Potter Available on Nook and Kindle – Digital Book World

You Can Buy the Harry Potter E-Books Now – Here’s What You Need to Know – paidcontent.org

Harry Potter Digital Checkouts Start Thursday – Digital Shift

Why Pottermore Could Change Everything – Digital Book World

What’s the greater fear for publishers? Amazon or Piracy? The Shatzkin Files

Confirmed:  Harry Potter eBooks Are NOT DRM-Free in Kindle Format (or any other bookstore) – The Digital Reader