Category Archives: Articles of Interest

Self Publishing fuels steady title growth in 2011

From a Bowker press release.  Lots of interesting data here about title output from 2011.

June 5, 2012 (New Providence, NJ) — Bowker, the global leader in bibliographic information, released its annual report on U. S. print book publishing for 2011, compiled from its Books In Print® database. Based on preliminary figures from U.S. publishers, Bowker is projecting that traditional print book output grew six percent in 2011, from 328,259 titles in 2010 to a projected 347,178 in 2011, driven almost exclusively by a strong self-publishing market. This is the most significant expansion in more than four years for America’s traditional publishing sector, but removing self-publishing from the equation would show that the market is relatively flat from 2010.

“Transformation of our industry has brought on a time of rich innovation in the publishing models we now have today. What was once relegated to the outskirts of our industry—and even took on demeaning names like ‘vanity press’ is now not only a viable alternative but what is driving the title growth of our industry today,” said Kelly Gallagher, Vice-President, Bowker Market Research. “From that standpoint, self-publishing is a true legitimate power to be reckoned with. Coupled with the explosive growth of e-books and digital content – these two forces are moving the industry in dramatic ways.” Continue reading

ALA releases E-Content: The Digital Dialogue

Available online now!
E-Content: The Digital Dialogue

This digital supplement addresses critical issues related to ebooks, e-content, digital literacy, and more! You can read it online or pick up one of a limited supply of print copies at the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim—pick yours up at Office for Information Technology Policy programs and in the ALA Membership Pavilion.

American Libraries Digital Supplement

What you’ll find inside:

  • ALA´s Digital Content and Libraries Working Group cochairs, Sari Feldman and Robert Wolven,summarize recent ebook activities and suggest directions for the future.
  • Deborah Caldwell-Stone from the Office for Intellectual Freedom focuses on ebook privacy and related ethical issues.
  • James LaRue offers perspectives from a reader, librarian, publisher, writer, and bookseller on ebooks today and tomorrow.

You can read this supplement in the easy-to-use Zmag web browser format, or download it as a PDF for offline reading. Click here to get started.

Articles of Interest

E-Books Drive Revenue Growth Across Book Trade in January 2012 – Digital Book World

JK Rowling’s Pottermore Breaks eBook Lockdown, Might Change eBooks Forever – Huffington Post

LG Begins Mass Production of first flexible , plastic eInk displays – Extreme Tech

An Academic Spring – American Libraries

A Look at Students using eTextbooks (Infographic) – eBOOKNEWSER

Bringing up a Young Reader on E-Books – New York Times

Will Hatchette Be The First Big-6 Publisher toDrop DRM on E-books? – paidcontent.org

Going Digital Does Not Lower Textbook Prices – Inside Higher Education

Articles of Interest: Pottermore version

Great reads today about the launch of e-book sales from Pottermore.

Pottermore Shop (for ebooks, U.S. site)

Announcements:  Potter Available on Nook and Kindle – Digital Book World

You Can Buy the Harry Potter E-Books Now – Here’s What You Need to Know – paidcontent.org

Harry Potter Digital Checkouts Start Thursday – Digital Shift

Why Pottermore Could Change Everything – Digital Book World

What’s the greater fear for publishers? Amazon or Piracy? The Shatzkin Files

Confirmed:  Harry Potter eBooks Are NOT DRM-Free in Kindle Format (or any other bookstore) – The Digital Reader

Articles of Interest

Library Publishing Report Suggests Partnerships, Creating Positions   – Library Journal

Aloha Encyclopaedia Britannica Print Edition – Information Today

Thinking more about ebooks and libraries and what big publishers should do – The Shatzkin Files

Libraries as Community Publishers:  How to Turn the Tables – Publishers Weekly

How to Protect Copyright Is Key Topic at Publishers’ Meeting – Chronicle of Higher Education

The Portal Problem, Part 1: The Plight of the Britannica - Scholarly Kitchen

Jetbook Color Now Deployed to NYC’s Largest High School – eBook Newser

Speed and Retention — Are e-Readers more Slower and More Forgetful – Scholarly Kitchen

Articles of Interest – PLA version

Ebook Talks Continued:  ALA Meets with Distributors – eContent blog

Boopsie Approaches Integration in Its Own Way; New Competitor Emerges at PLA | Digital Shift

Ebook Providers, ILS Vendors Move Rapidly to Remove Friction From E-Lending; OverDrive APIs Coming in April Digital Shift

OverDrive’s Library eReader is Better Than 3M’s Library eReader – The Digital Reader

3M Cloud Library Integrates with Polaris ILS Digital Shift

3M Cloud Library – an Interview with Matt Tempelis from 3M

The Great Library Roadshow Facebook Page

The Great Library Roadshow on Storify

Baker & Taylor, Axis 360, and the Blio Reader

It seems as though OverDrive and 3M garner all of the attention when it comes to ebooks for the public library market.  So, it’s nice to see Baker & Taylor’s Axis 360 in the news this week.  Library Journal’s Mike Kelley wrote a fabulously detailed article about the service titled, “With Axis 360, Baker & Taylor Establishes a Foothold in the Ebook Distribution Market.”  He provides an overview of the digital media platform, Axis 360 and a glimpse of their reader, blio. It’s definitely worth a look, particularly for small libraries with limited funds for ebooks.

I had the chance to speak with Michael Bills, Director of Sales for Digital Products at Baker & Taylor about Axis 360 and Blio a few months ago.  Our audio interview is available as part of the NSR interviews series. Have a listen.

Should Libraries Get Out of the Ebook Business by Bobbi Newman

Bobbi Newman, who blogs at Librarian by Day, has an excellent editorial post about current Ebook conditions in public libraries.  She questions whether libraries should step back and wait for better options, quoting several other prominent bloggers on the subject.  It’s an interesting thought piece from a public library perspective.  The comments are just as interesting.

Here is a brief clip from the post – Should Libraries Get Out of the Ebook Business?

Or get out at least until there is a better system? I know what you are going to say, I can hear it already – “We can’t! Our patrons demand ebooks!” Except the truth is our patrons want a lot of things we can’t give them – to always be first on the waiting list for the new James Patterson, to not pay fines when their books are late, for the library to be open earlier or later, or to have a system besides Dewey because despite using it their entire lives they still cannot figure it out. When it comes to ebooks, we cannot give them what they want, not really, we cannot give them books from Simon and Schuster or MacMillian or new books from Penguin or Hatchet, and not more than 26 times from HarperCollins, and probably not many books from Random House. What we can do, what maybe we should do, is spend their tax money wisely, and I am no longer convinced that spending it on the current ebook system is a wise move.

Library Renewal Article – The Arithmetic of Library E-Book Lending

A great article is available on the Library Renewal site  - $2 BILLION FOR $1 BILLION OF BOOKS: THE ARITHMETIC OF LIBRARY E-BOOK LENDING written by Jonathan Chambers.

Here is a clip from the introductory material:  Library Renewal wants to help libraries build a powerful new way to get econtent to their patrons. We envision a new infrastructure, one that is vastly improved, equitable and fairly priced (with hidden costs eliminated). In order to figure out exactly how to make something like that a reality and create an actionable plan we have been busy doing research and meeting with experts from a variety of areas. We’ve naturally talked with plenty of library folks, but we have also actively included and sought out others that have legal, business and publishing expertise. Jonathan Chambers, the author of this piece, fits that bill perfectly and has worked directly with us a great deal over the past year. Here you’ll see the sort of approach some folks working with Library Renewal are thinking about. We (both Library Renewal and Mr. Chambers) would love to hear your reactions to this post in the comments.
*note* While the pricing changes implemented very recently by Random House are not factored into the dollar amounts discussed here, that in no way changes the conclusions that are drawn in this piece. Drastic changes like what we have been seeing related to libraries and econtent are endemic to the systems currently in place. We believe that these sorts of market shifts serve to strengthen the premise that specific types of action are in order and that Library Renewal is the perfect partner for that work. Enjoy!

Articles of Interest – Random House edition

Librarians Feel Sticker Shock as Price for Random House Ebooks Rises as Much as 300 Percent – The Digital Shift

ALA Issues Statement Asking Random House to Reconsider eBook Increase – INFODocket

ALA calls on Random House to reconsider major ebook price increase – ALA

Random House Not So Random with Library Ebook Price Increases – Agnostic Maybe

Necessary Evil? Random House Triples Prices Of Library E-Books – TechCrunch

Rich Books, Poor Society: Random House’s Price Spike – Publisher’s Weekly

Added later:

Random Houses Price Hikes Are GOOD For Libraries, IF… – Go To Hellman