Category Archives: Google Books

New Articles of Interest

Wow, e-book talk has exploded.  There are so many good stories from the past week.  Have a look at some.

Tech Change: The library’s changing approach to ebooks and technology! By Tony Bandy

Some Thoughts on Free Textbooks

It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

The eBook Wars: Agency & Winners

Two studies on e-library economics

Hurtling Toward the Finish Line: Should the Google Books Settlement Be Approved?: California Digital Library

E-Library Economics – Inside Higher Ed

Electronic Frontier Foundation discusses digital books and your rights

iPad for Kids Coming from Mattel

Apple to wrap digital books in FairPlay copy protection [Clarified]

New Articles of Interest

SPIE launches digital library

Authors Guild responds to Justice Department’s comments

Department of Justice objects to revised Google Books settlement

Textbook companies to partner with ScrollMotion to put content on iPad

Macmillan’s Amazon Beatdown Proves Content Is King

Future of eReading might not be iPad, but Blio

Apple unveils iPad. Your move, Amazon

The iPad to Ruin the Book Publishing Industry?

Steve Jobs Reveals Apple’s eBook Pricing

The Future of the Book Market, Part 3: Publishers Content Providers

FT.com / Media – Walls close in on e-book garden

Revised Google Books settlement pleases few

Google Books, links to letters, objections/responses

Here’s a link to the letter sent to the DOJ from the Exec Dir’s of ALA/ACRL/ARL on December 15th, outlining concerns of pricing and the lack of academic representation on the Registry Board.

And another link for the NY Law School document outlining the objections and responses in the amended settlement.

DOJ Response to the Google Book Settlement

Lots of news and blog sites are reporting on the Dept. of Justice response to the Google Book Settlement.

Teleread has a simple summary, referring folks to the 32 page DOJ official response, Resource Shelf summarizes a variety of news sources, and for a simple overview, see the DOJ Press Release.   The DOJ suggests the parties involved consider several changes to the agreement including:

  • imposing limitations on the most open-ended provisions for future licensing,
  • eliminating potential conflicts among class members,
  • providing additional protections for unknown rights holders,
  • addressing the concerns of foreign authors and publishers,
  • eliminating the joint-pricing mechanisms among publishers and authors, and,
  • whatever the settlement’s ultimate scope, providing some mechanism by which Google’s competitors can gain comparable access.

Comments on Google Book Search Settlement Coming to a Head (Again)

Ah, it is the beginning of September when thoughts turn to going back to school, the days turn a little colder (in the northern hemisphere) and the smell of lawsuit briefs is in the air. Well, okay — the latter might not be what you expect, but this is a special September, after all. Postponed from MayL1, the deadline for filing comments in the Google Book Search settlement is coming up. And everyone is weighing in (”again” for some) on the details of the settlement. A couple of highlights.

The American Library Association (ALA), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL)L2 again offered its support for the settlement, if only the court would promise to extend vigorous oversight of pricing and privacy practices of Google and the Books Rights Registry. This came in the form of a supplemental filingL3 to the briefL4 the three organizations filed in MayL5 (just prior to the first comment deadline). Continue reading

The Google Book Scanning Project: Issues and Updates – EDUCAUSE Webinar Summary

Sat in on the EDUCAUSE webinar on the Google Book scanning project.  The speakers were

Jonathan Band
Counsel, Library Copyright Alliance
Dan Clancy
Engineering Director, Google Book Search Continue reading

UM to sell digitized books on Amazon

First Google, now Amazon, UM has certainly got connections.  They announced this week a plan to offer book reprints for sale on Amazon as reprints on demand.  According to their press release,”The University of Michigan will make thousands of books that are no longer in copyright — including rare and one-of-a-kind titles — available as reprints on demand under a new agreement with BookSurge, part of the Amazon.com group of companies.  The agreement gives the public a unique opportunity to buy reprints of a wide range of titles in the U-M Library for as little as a few dollars. As individual copies are sold on Amazon.com, BookSurge will print and bind the books in soft-cover form.” Continue reading