Category Archives: Interfaces/Platforms

eBook Platform Evaluation Criteria

While at ACRL, I met a Librarian at Wellesley College by the name of Deborah Lenares.  She was in the midst of evaluating ebook aggregator platforms and shared with me her comparative spreadsheet.  It’s quite thorough and I thought it could be a great community project to work on it together.  So, Deborah has posted this spreadsheet to google docs and it is open and available for editing by anyone.

Document is available here:  https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AtHuZMbGK8S1dGpsZHdhYmZsLUhqbW50STZlcTZPT3c&hl=en_US#gid=0

The University of California – Irvine also did a comparison spreadsheet.  It is available for download here:  http://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2010/01/06/checklist-for-evaluating-patron-driven-business-models/

Finally, the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in the United Kingdom maintains an academic database assessment tool for e-books.  Users select vendors and the comparison data is displayed based on user choice.  It is available here:  http://www.jisc-adat.com/adat/adat_ebooks.pl

Widgets Increase Use of eReference Collections

From the Gale/Cengage RE:sources blog, May 2009

Widgets pack a wallop

Results from K-12 school, academic and public libraries confirm that usage soars when you add the ability to search all or part of your Gale Virtual Reference Library collection with a widget. Comparing the number of user sessions before and after the addition of a widget on the pages of a high school in Minnesota, a college in Texas and a public library in Ohio, Mark Springer, a data analyst from Gale, documented gains of 178%, 167% and 140% respectively. Read more results like these in the RE:sources blog next week.

Results of widgets in three libraries

Is it possible to donate an eBook to the library?

Roger Sperberg wrote an interesting piece, “How to give away an ebook after you’ve read it” in the Teleread blog.  He discusses the idea of patrons purchasing an ebook to read for themselves and donating it to the library when they are finished.  Roger states, “If I buy an ebook of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, then it’s glued to me. Love it or hate it, I can’t give it to the library for others to read. So why doesn’t the library set up a program for donors: “Buy it in our name and we’ll lend it to you first.” Continue reading

ebrary Integrates with RefWorks and EndNote

ebrary Integrates with RefWorks and EndNote, Adds Printing to QuickView, Offers Search by Collection

May 18, 2009 – Palo Alto, CA, USA – ebrary®, a leading provider of digital content products and technologies, today announced that it has enhanced its industry-renowned interface with a number of new capabilities that make content discovery, usage, and management quicker and more productive.

All ebrary products now integrate with RefWorks and EndNote for easy citation management. End-users may choose to enable RefWorks, EndNote, or both. Once enabled, these options appear under the new InfoTools™ menu in ebrary’s QuickView™ Reader, which does not require any software downloads or installations, as well as in search results and personal bookshelves. Continue reading

Interview with Kari Paulson, President of EBL

We’ve posted a new interview to our interviews page.  This time, it’s with Kari Paulson, President of EBL.  In this interview, Kari discusses various business models offered by EBL and unique features of their interface.  She references some case studies that were done by CERN and Swinburne University.  Kari’s interview adds to NSR’s collection of 12 previous interviews.  Check them all out on the interviews page.

Checklist for evaluating eBook aggregators

A colleague of mine, Deborah Lenares, from Wellesley College forwarded me her checklist for evaluating eBook aggregators.  We thought it would be a good idea to share this spreadsheet and allow other librarians the opportunity to add evaluation criteria.  So, if you are interested in viewing/adding to it, you’ll find it on google docs.   Caution, as soon as you make a change to the spreadsheet, it’s there for good, or at least until someone else changes it.  We’ll see how this goes.

Baker & Taylor partners with ebrary for digital distribution

Big news from Baker & Taylor.  They announced today a partnership with ebrary for an “integrated digital media platform.”  B&T will provide seamless purchase of either print or electronic content through this new platform.  The partnership also allows B&T to create it’s own digital content for distribution via the ebrary platform.What a convenience for libraries.  No longer will you spend hours tracking down ebook ISBN’s, prices, and ordering information from a multitude of websites.  Those libraries using YBP – part of the B&T family, have had the pleasure of purchasing print or electronic books through the GOBI platform since January, 2007.  The wider B&T partnership now takes this convenience across library markets. This will really become a one-stop shop once ebrary establishes their demand driven purchasing model. Perhaps patrons could use the system to choose e or p versions of titles!

New audio interview – Leslie Lees, ebrary

A new audio interview has been posted to NSR’s interviews page.  This one features Leslie Lees, VP-Content and Market Development, ebrary.  Leslie and I discussed methods of ebook purchasing that involve patrons and what ebrary is doing to plan for these new business models.  Check it out, it’s absolutely the best thing you’ll hear all week!

NSR interviews are generally 15 – 20 minutes in length.  I recommend you download the mp3 file, then listen.