Category Archives: Lending Readers

Using Bluefire Reader to Download Library eBooks

There have been several blog posts this week about using the BlueFire Reader application to download eBooks from library collections to various iOS devices.  Josh Hadro from Library Journal has a great post with step-by-step instructions and screen shots.  Other posts, not as detailed as Josh’s, include:

CNet – Bluefire Reader brings free public-library e-books to iOS

Another post from the Download Squad site offers a brief description with a couple of screen shots.

Articles of Interest

Three misperceptions about the ebook business

Textbooks headed for ash heap of history?

A Student’s Stranded On A Desert Island … Tech Devices

Inside the Google Books Algorithm – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

iTunes U Introduces Free eBooks: Download Shakespeare’s Complete Works

Joe Wikert’s Publishing 2020 Blog: eBooks: Lending vs. Reselling

Forrester Research on future of ebooks: $3 billion by 2015

Will Your Local Library Lend E-Books? (Or Can They?)

Library eBooks on the iPad/iPhone, no Sync Required – Library Journal

Kindle Facts and Figures (history & specs)

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading

Charleston Conference, eBook Access Models and Technology

Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Digital Services Librarian at Southern Connecticut State University, spoke about access models for eBooks, specifically with mobile devices and dedicated eReaders. Lisa spoke about barriers to access stating that restrictive DRM, licensing, and incompatible formats are all barriers to accessibility of eBooks.  Additionally, devices all have different loading options. Librarians have to understand DRM, formats, and compatibility between devices in order to assist their patrons.

Lisa suggested we visit the M-Libraries site, where librarians are sharing their knowledge about ebooks and mobile access.  She also recommended a post from Stephen’s Lighthouse where he lists several sites that compare eBook readers. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Ebook restrictions leave libraries facing virtual lockout

The End of the Textbook as We Know It – Technology

SLJ Leadership Summit 2010: Librarians and Ereaders

New Barnes & Noble children’s e-book program hints at color touchscreen Nook

An Amazon Digital Book Rental Plan? – Inside Higher Ed

Source: New Nook is Android-based, full-color – CNET News

Save on textbooks Actions for Students – Student PIRGs

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

OverDrive Issues Statement on Publishers Association eBook Lending

OverDrive issued a statement today in response to the Publishers Association remarks on eBook lending. The full statement is here.  An excerpt:

OverDrive proudly works with over 50 UK publishers that license eBooks to UK public libraries for lending via remote download. Since the inception of the service over 6 years ago, slightly over 14,000 total eBook units serving public library authorities in Great Britain, Scotland, and Ireland have been licensed through OverDrive. The average circulation is 2.9 check outs per title. As the service grows in popularity, circulation will increase. But so will the number of units, thereby keeping the circulation per title relatively constant.

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with the Publishers Association.

Reprinted in full from Library Journal, October 15, 2010. Francine, you go girl!

Dear Publishers,

We missed you, but, more importantly, you missed out on an opportunity to engage in discussion with a large market already invested in the future of ebooks. ­Library Journal and School Library Journal’s first virtual ebook summit—a daylong event on September 29—focused on how public, academic, and school libraries are addressing digital books. It drew over 2100 registrants who stayed for an average of five and one-half hours. Over 238 libraries purchased site licenses so staff could come and go. At Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, the event drew—and distracted—the entire leadership team from its regularly scheduled meeting. (The summit archive is still available online, until December 31, 2010, at www.ebook-summit.com.) Continue reading

Articles of Interest

I missed this last Friday, sorry for the long list.

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

UK Publishers Association sets out restrictions on ebook lending – stupid!

Specter of e-book piracy looms large on horizon

If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of Us | Digital Book World

How five e-readers stacked up – USA Today

In Digital Age, Students Still Cling to Paper Textbooks

The Thinking LMS (Learning Management System) – Inside Higher Ed

Kindles at high school bring praise, surprises – one month of use at Clearwater High School

6 things I would do today if I were a bookstore owner waiting for Google Editions

Honey, I Shrunk the E-Book: Amazon Slicing “Singles” for Kindle

Libertary: new book reading site

Amazon has 76% of e-book market, survey reports

Kindles, Sony & Nook e-Readers Allowing Libraries To Thrive In Information Age?

CUNY to launch Entourage Edge pilot program

As Textbooks Go Digital, Will Professors Build Their Own Books? – Technology

New Articles of Interest

Standards & Best Practices – Identifiers – Roadmap of Identifiers …BISG

Video – Students Love AccessMyLibrary School Edition – Gale/Cengage

Hands-On with a New e-Reader – NYTimes.com

Library Labs Turn to Their Patrons for Project Ideas – Wired Campus

Why Share Open Educational Resources? – College Open Textbooks Blog

Library can’t lend an eBook to Kindle user | StarTribune.com

Xerox to sell and service Espresso Book Machines

Kobo announces WiFi ereader – faster processor, new screen

Ready to ditch paper? Here are the top 10 e-readers

Kno announces 14-inch single-screen tablet

Amazon Patent Could Charge For Browsing A Book Online – eBookNewser

Amazon launches “Kindle on the Web”

SONY’s Reader Library Program – But can they loan the devices?

Great news from SONY.  They just announced 30 libraries across the country who will participate with them in the SONY Reader Library Program.  It’s truly wonderful to see an eBook reader company reaching out to libraries to promote and encourage the use of the eBooks.  What is unclear, however, is whether the program encourages libraries to lend the SONY devices to patrons.  The press release states that devices will be provided for library staff use and patron demonstrations.    I hope they won’t stop short of the idea to lend devices to patrons.  Here is more information from the SONY Press Release: Continue reading