Category Archives: Licenses/Licensing Issues

Unglue.it to launch on May 17 at 12 noon EDT

From an Unglue.it email:  So: here it is.  On May 17, at 12 noon EDT, unglue.it will launch its first set of campaigns.

Between now and then we’ll be eyeballs-deep in code and paperwork, running the final tests on our payment processing system, applying some last-minute usability and design tweaks, and working with our rights holders to build their campaigns. We’ll have at least one test campaign; follow us on Twitter or Facebook if you want to help us out.

So far, there are four books signed off for launch with a few more possibles, and we are so eager to unveil them. We hope you’ll be thrilled to support them. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

E-Books Drive Revenue Growth Across Book Trade in January 2012 – Digital Book World

JK Rowling’s Pottermore Breaks eBook Lockdown, Might Change eBooks Forever – Huffington Post

LG Begins Mass Production of first flexible , plastic eInk displays – Extreme Tech

An Academic Spring – American Libraries

A Look at Students using eTextbooks (Infographic) – eBOOKNEWSER

Bringing up a Young Reader on E-Books – New York Times

Will Hatchette Be The First Big-6 Publisher toDrop DRM on E-books? – paidcontent.org

Going Digital Does Not Lower Textbook Prices – Inside Higher Education

Articles of Interest

Library Publishing Report Suggests Partnerships, Creating Positions   – Library Journal

Aloha Encyclopaedia Britannica Print Edition – Information Today

Thinking more about ebooks and libraries and what big publishers should do – The Shatzkin Files

Libraries as Community Publishers:  How to Turn the Tables – Publishers Weekly

How to Protect Copyright Is Key Topic at Publishers’ Meeting – Chronicle of Higher Education

The Portal Problem, Part 1: The Plight of the Britannica - Scholarly Kitchen

Jetbook Color Now Deployed to NYC’s Largest High School – eBook Newser

Speed and Retention — Are e-Readers more Slower and More Forgetful – Scholarly Kitchen

Should Libraries Get Out of the Ebook Business by Bobbi Newman

Bobbi Newman, who blogs at Librarian by Day, has an excellent editorial post about current Ebook conditions in public libraries.  She questions whether libraries should step back and wait for better options, quoting several other prominent bloggers on the subject.  It’s an interesting thought piece from a public library perspective.  The comments are just as interesting.

Here is a brief clip from the post – Should Libraries Get Out of the Ebook Business?

Or get out at least until there is a better system? I know what you are going to say, I can hear it already – “We can’t! Our patrons demand ebooks!” Except the truth is our patrons want a lot of things we can’t give them – to always be first on the waiting list for the new James Patterson, to not pay fines when their books are late, for the library to be open earlier or later, or to have a system besides Dewey because despite using it their entire lives they still cannot figure it out. When it comes to ebooks, we cannot give them what they want, not really, we cannot give them books from Simon and Schuster or MacMillian or new books from Penguin or Hatchet, and not more than 26 times from HarperCollins, and probably not many books from Random House. What we can do, what maybe we should do, is spend their tax money wisely, and I am no longer convinced that spending it on the current ebook system is a wise move.

Articles of Interest

Some numbers on the Kindle owners lending library and KDP – teleread.com

B&N discounting Nooks with periodical subscriptions – marco.org

Barnes & Noble to Offer Nook Discount to Subscribers of 2 publications – nytimes.com

Launching the University Press Content Consortia – wordpress.com

Guggenheim Museum Getting Into eBooks – mediabistro.com

Reddit to Black Itself Out Next Week in Protest of SOPA – theatlantic.com

Ebooks take off over the holidays, says USA Today – teleread.com

Amazon introduces iPad Kindle Store – macworld.com

Brave New World: First Sale Doctrine: Digital Threat or Opportunity – blogspot.com

How Barnes & Noble Can Take a Bite Out of Amazon – sspnet.org

Safari Books Online acquires makers of Ibis Reader – ThreePress Consulting – teleread.com

Ultimate Discovery Engine – publishersweekly.com

Three Library Predictions for 2012 – Andy Woodworth

NISO Releases Updated Draft of SERU: A Shared Electronic Resource Understanding – infodocket.com

Kobo has 10x increase in readers over holidays; top ebooks by country – teleread.com

Turn WebPages into Kindle, Epub eBooks with dotEpub – mediabistro.com

My Argument for Public Access to Research Reports – sspnet.org

House takes Senate’s bad Internet censorship bill, tries to make it worse – arstechnica.com

More Than a Million eReaders Were Given Away in the UK This Season – mediabistro.com

Full Text Article: The Evolution of E-books and Interlibrary Loan in Academic Libraries – infodocket.com

Douglas County Libraries adds 8th Publisher to locally loaded eBook collection

The Douglas County Libraries (Colorado) have been working on a project to purchase eBooks direct from publishers and locally load them on an Adobe Content Server.  The titles are then loaned to patrons for use on their personal devices or computers.  To date they are working with 8 publishers (listed below).  Dzanc Books is the latest partner.  To hear more about their project, listen to an audio interview with Jordana Vincent, Collection Development Librarian, Douglas County Libraries (11/11).

From the 1/11/12 Press Release:  DCL and Dzanc join forces for eContent

Douglas County Libraries and Dzanc Books have joined forces to allow for library purchase of eBooks from Dzanc Books. Dzanc Books is the first nonprofit publisher to join DCL’s eBook purchasing experiment, and is a champion of literature and writing. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Why Might A Publisher Pull Its E-Books From Libraries? by Laura Hazard Owen « INFOdocket
Which E-Books Are Most Borrowed From Libraries, And Why? | paidContent
So you want to start a Kindle lending program | code4lib
How to add public domain books to the Kindle, by Piotr Kowalczyk | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics
Kobo has 10x increase in readers over holidays; top ebooks by country | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics
Full Text Article: The Evolution of E-books and Interlibrary Loan in Academic Libraries « INFOdocket
Seven Advantages Barnes & Noble Has in the Bookseller Wars | Digital Book World
Barnes & Noble May Spin Off Nook Business
Turn WebPages into Kindle, Epub eBooks with dotEpub – eBookNewser
Baen Webscriptions is now BaenEbooks.com | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics
The Association of American Publishers – Publishers Applaud “Research Works Act,”Bipartisan Legislation To End Government Mandates on Private-Sector Scholarly Publishing
My Argument for Public Access to Research Reports « The Scholarly Kitchen
House takes Senate’s bad Internet censorship bill, tries making it worse
More Than a Million eReaders Were Given Away in the UK This Christmas Season – eBookNewser
E-Textbooks Saved Many Students Only $1 – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education
If Libraries Didn’t Exist, Would Publishers Be Trying To Kill Book Lending? | Techdirt

Articles of Interest – Public Libraries & OverDrive, DRM, and fixed pricing

The E-book Investigations: Are Publishers And Apple Breaking The Law? | paidContent

FEATURE: Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries

OverDrive Has Different eBook Catalogs for Different Libraries

theanalogdivide » Blog Archive » It’s Not Just Overdrive.

Library Wars: Amazon and Publishers Vie for Control of E-Book Rentals – Peter Osnos – Entertainment – The Atlantic

The Exodus Begins – Kansas Library Consortium Has left OverDrive – The Digital Reader

Leaked Document: Hachette Explains Why Publishers Are Relevant | Digital Book World

Justice Department confirms investigation of e-book industry – latimes.com

BISG Press Release | Official BISG Policy Statement on Best Practices for Identifying Digital Products Now Available

Wisconsin Public Library Consortium » Kindle disclaimer on OverDrive downloads

Amazon Tempts Kindle Self-Publishers With $6 Million Fund

Public Library E-Book Lending Must Change to Survive « Copyright and Technology -

Another View of DRM for Publishers « The Scholarly Kitchen

Publishers’ insistance on DRM allows Amazon to lock them in to its garden | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics

Why Christmas Day Will Soon Be the Biggest Online Shopping Day Each Year, and Why It Changes Everything | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics

E-Everything: Putting It All Together

The November, 2011 issue of Against the Grain focuses on the e-everything future.  Edited by Audrey Powers from the University of South Florida, the issue discusses e-content procurement, access models and technology, content integration, first sale doctrine, and much more. It’s a great line-up of contributors and topics.  The table of contents should be posted on their site very soon here:  http://www.against-the-grain.com/toc/

Many of the contributors were also part of the E-Everything pre-conference during the Charleston Conference in early November.  Archived versions of the pre-conference presentation will be available on Against the Grain and Libraries Thriving sites.

Interview with Douglas County Libraries’ Jordana Vincent

The Douglas County Libraries (Colorado) have embarked on a quest to purchase eBook content to load on their own Adobe Content Server.  The first milestone in the project was a partnership with the Colorado Independent Publishers Association.  Since then, they have made headway with Gale and Lerner Digital.  Jordana Vincent, Collection Development Librarian at Douglas County Libraries and I discussed the project in a recent NSR interview.  Ms. Vincent discusses several innovative ideas coming from DCL and offers much detail about the current project.  She can be reached for more info at jvincent at dclibraries dot org. Continue reading