Category Archives: Mobile Devices

NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition

Very cool news from OCLC/NetLibrary.  Their e-books are now compatible with the Nook as well as the new SONY Daily Edition (they were already compatible with the 4 versions of SONY Readers).  This is a real benefit for libraries who are looking for more e-reader options.  It opens up so many potentials for patron downloads and the use of e-readers by libraries (for circulation).  I hope to see other aggregators and publishers following suit and (fingers crossed) adding more textbooks to the mix.  The press release from OCLC is below.

NetLibrary eBooks compatible with new Barnes & Noble nook, new ony Daily Edition and other popular eBook readers

140,000 eBook titles available for download to portable devices
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Gale Announces New iPhone Application

From a Gale/Cengage Press Release:

Gale Announces New iPhone Application
Library research? There’s an application for that!

Farmington Hills, Mich., Dec. 16, 2009 – Gale, part of Cengage Learning, today announced the launch of the AccessMyLibrary (AML) mobile application for the iPhone – making access to library research just a click away on a mobile phone.  Continue reading

Want to chat about eBook Devices in Libraries?

A new Google discussion group has been launched to discuss eBook devices in libraries.  According to the site, “this group is designed for discussions of what libraries are doing vis-a-vis eBook services designed primarily for reading on portable electronic reading devices.”  As of this morning, 85 members have joined, but the discussion is a bit quiet.  I’m certain that will change soon as there is plenty to talk about on eBook devices in libraries.  Anyone can join and the group email address is:  ebook-devices-in-libraries@googlegroups.com

OverDrive Releases Digital Audiobook Application for Windows Mobile(R)

A press release from Overdrive, September 9, 2009

First in a Series of Mobile Apps for Over-the-Air Downloading From Booksellers and Libraries

(Cleveland, OH) – September 9, 2009 – OverDrive (www.overdrive.com), the leading global distributor of digital audiobooks and eBooks to libraries and retailers, announced the release of the first in a series of free digital book applications for mobile devices. OverDrive® Media Console(TM) for Windows Mobile® (http://overdrive.com/software/omc) enables users with Windows Mobile phones to wirelessly download audiobooks, music, and video to their devices and play the titles with the same superior navigation features of OverDrive’s desktop software. To view a list of supported devices including Sprint Palm Treo(TM), AT&T Samsung Jack(TM), and Verizon HTC Touch Pro(TM), visit http://www.microsoft.com/windowsmobile/en-us/devices/default.mspx.
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ebook devices – a resource guide

Attended a virtual conference today, “The Handheld Librarian.”  There were two presentations on ebooks, one related to Kindles in libraries and the other on ebook devices.  The latter, presented by Charlotte Johnson of Southern Illinois University, highlighted the resourceful LibGuide she has developed on ebook reading devices.  It is available from the SIU Edwardsville site.  She has a section for each major device including Sony Reader, Kindle, Apple iTouch/iPhone, Plastic Logic, iRex, and Augmented Reality.

Finally, a Textbook Program for Students with Disabilities

Being part of the Wright State University community has given me a whole new perspective on students with disabilities.  Approximately 10% of our population is part of this community.  It is very difficult for these students to get their textbooks and other course material in a format appropriate to their needs.  That has just been made easier with the announcement of the U.S. College and University Partnership with Bookshare.  Bookshare is the largest accessible online library for people with print disabilities.  Their press release contains all the details of this new program.  Text of this release is also below, click on more.   Continue reading

EBL titles on iPhone, iTouch

From the EBL blog:

We’ve recently announced that EBL titles can be downloaded to the Sony Reader, but did you know that EBL’s new reader is already accessible on an iPhone and iPod Touch?

Patrons can access EBL  titles on their iPhone or iPod Touch through the normal webpages.  The image view in the reader will render the full book.  Scrolling works by using two fingers. We’re planning to offer a scaled down view more suitable for mobile access later this year.

And news just in… downloading EBL ebooks to the iPhone/iPod Touch is soon to follow.  Adobe have just announced a partnership with Stanza Reader, the reader application designed for the iPhone. Read more here.

ebrary’s new QuickView

According to an ebrary press release, they have launched their new QuickView.  QuickView “enables end-users to instantly view documents in many of the leading web browsers and even works on the iPhone. No software downloads or installations are needed.”  Groovy.  QuickView will not replace the existing Java Based Reader, it is offered in conjunction.

ebrary’s key features of QuickView:

    • Instant viewing and page flipping in a web browser
    • Relevancy ranking at the chapter level with links to specific sections
    • Navigate to search terms or specified pages
    • Search within documents for key words
    • View and navigate to highlights and notes created using an ebrary Reader
    • Multiple view magnifications

I’ll check this out at Charleston this week and give it a whirl on the iPhone.  Anxious to see how legible that will be!

A Wireless, Color E Reader

From the TeleRead blog – via Gizmodo

There is not a ton of information about the KDDI R&D Laboratories Inc. “Portable Viewer System” but what has been revealed is exciting. It’s A4 and can wirelessly receive images from devices like a mobile phone. The screen can display up to 4,096 colors and refresh in 12 seconds. I’m not sure whether e-paper means it’s a derivative of eink or some other screen technology.

Strangely the device is nearly completely controlled by the handset. It doesn’t seem a very practical interface, but it is a prototype.

by Jane Litte