Category Archives: Press Releases

ebrary now has on demand MARC records

From ebrary:

ebrary Announces On-Demand MARC Records

January 6, 2009 – Palo Alto, CA – ebrary®, a leading provider of e-content software and services, today announced that customers can now immediately upload free MARC records for individual titles they purchase as well as e-books and other documents added to the company’s subscription databases.  Additionally, ebrary’s new MARC features make it easier for customers to manage MARC records and upload large batches.

“As well as providing our customers with the best possible technology for acquiring, sharing, and distributing authoritative digital content, we also strive to provide support and services that make it easier for librarians and information professionals to use and integrate our products,” said Neal Strickberger, ebrary’s Vice President of MIS and Customer Operations. “In gathering feedback from our customers, we heard loud and clear that developing a quicker, more efficient way to obtain and manage MARC records would greatly enhance our offerings.  We are pleased to make this request a reality through on-demand MARC features.”

Available today, ebrary’s on-demand MARC features offer the following capabilities:

* Instant MARC updates – Customers can download new MARC records for purchased titles and additions to subscription e-book collections at any time, as incremental or complete record sets.
* MARC records separated by collection – Customers with multiple subscription collections and purchased titles can download complete or incremental sets of MARC records for specific collections.
* Deleted MARC records – Customers can now obtain deleted records as MARC delete records or on an Excel spreadsheet.
* Complete MARC record sets for large collections – To simplify loading, complete MARC loads are now available from ebrary’s extranet site as batches of 5,000 in a single ZIP file.

About ebrary (www.ebrary.com)
ebrary® is a leading provider of e-content services and technology.  The company helps libraries, publishers, and other organizations disseminate valuable information to end-users, while improving end-user research and document interaction.

The company has developed a flexible e-content platform, which customers may use in a number of different, integrated capacities:  ebrary customers may purchase or subscribe to e-books and other content under a variety of pricing and access models, and they may license the ebrary platform to distribute, sell, and market their own content online.  All options are delivered using a customizable interface and include a choice of ebrary Readers with QuickView™ for instant viewing in a browser and  InfoTools™ software which provide contextual searching and integration with multiple online resources..

ebrary currently offers a growing selection of more than 170,000 e-books and other titles from more than 300 leading publishers and aggregators.

Founded in 1999, ebrary is privately held and is headquartered in Palo Alto, CA, USA.

###

Tish Wagner
ebrary
Library and Public Relations
707-963-2035- office
707-227-0870- mobile
tish.wagner@ebrary.com

More on Gale/Cengage and HighBeam

I just had a nice conversation with John Barnes, Executive VP Strategic Marketing and Business Development, at Gale/Cengage.  I asked John if Gale would be introducing new business models directed towards end users with their recent acquisition of HighBeam.  Below is a brief summary of our discussion.  Thanks John.

HighBeam’s clients are a combination of students and small businesses.

Gale/Cengage for several years has offered Goliath:  Business Knowledge on Demand, which consists of business information, targeted to small business clients.

With the acquisition of HighBeam, Gale now owns encyclopedia.com, which John says, “has untapped potential to connect users to the library.” Their mission, to place “high quality embedded information in front of end users.”

So, rather than a new business model for end users, Gale will continue to make information more discoverable to end-users through encyclopedia.com, Goliath, and their existing AccessMyLibrary product.  AccessMyLibrary allows a small slice of InfoTrac to be indexed by search engines.  When users “want to see more” they are prompted to enter information about their library, which in turn takes search engine traffic to libraries.

Discoverability.  It’s all about end users discovering our content, trapped in that invisible web.  I’m anxious to see how Gale can embed quality content into encyclopedia.com.  Wishful thinking, but maybe in time this could rival Wikipedia, with links to scholarly resources and digital and special library collections.

For more on discoverability, read John’s (and other reference publishers) comments in these articles in Booklist Online:

The Future of Electronic Reference Publishing:  A View from the Top, Part 1

The Future of Electronic Reference Publishing:  A View from the Top, Part2

HighBeam Research now part of Gale/Cengage

Gale/Cengage recently acquired HighBeam Research Inc.  If you are unfamiliar with HighBeam, they are an online reference source with access to over 3500 resources from magazine/newspaper articles to  journal articles to popular reference sources.  HighBeam provides it’s services to companies, small groups, and individuals rather than libraries.

This is a very interesting acquisition to me.  I anticipate many publishers will begin (or pump up) services direct to the end user or smaller organizations.  Makes sense since most research is done on the open web rather than via a library database trapped in the invisible web.

From the press release:  “The acquisition of HighBeam is a natural extension of our user-focused strategy.  Gale has had a presence on the open Web for many years now, particularly with AccessMyLibrary, which brings users from search engines into a library environment to explore their vast content riches.  Now, with the added expertise of HighBeam, Gale will have a greater opportunity to learn more about user behavior and research trends, and will use that information to further develop and enhance the user experience for all our products” said Sommers.

Daily Lit Partners with University of North Carolina Press

Daily Lit, the leading publisher of serialized books in digital format, recently announced a partnership with the University of North Carolina Press.  Several UNC Press books will be digitized, including two children’s titles – Teach’s Light and Taffy of Torpedo Junction.

I really enjoy the format of Daily Lit titles.  I get a daily email (RSS also available) with 1 – 3 minutes of reading from a title.  It’s an easy way to read in small doses.  For more information about Daily Lit, see previous NoShelfRequired posts from 9/29/08 and 11/21/08

Palgrave, Nature Launch eBook platform

eBook collections and platforms are popping up faster than daisies these days.  New this month is the Palgrave Macmillan platform – Palgrave Connect.  This is a collaborative effort from Palgrave and Nature and will include eBooks in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and business areas.  About 4,000 eBooks are available with the launch.�

Serials Solutions now includes eBooks

From a marketing email I received from Serials Solutions:

Serials Solutions KnowledgeWorks now includes 800,000 eBooks

With more budget resources being dedicated to the purchase of eBook databases and titles, a new challenge is to help patrons easily find these valuable resources and increase their usage.  <what about the catalog?> sp

Serials Solutions KnowledgeWorks, the authoritative e-resource knowledgebase, now integrates over 800,000 eBook holdings into Serials Solutions 360 e-resource access services to benefit your patrons.

* Help patrons find eBooks in your OPAC using 360 MARC Updates OPAC updating service
* Enable patrons to browse an A-to-Z title list of e-resources include eBooks using 360 Core
* Provide access to eBooks from citations or a citation search form using 360 Link OpenURL link resolver
* Help patrons discover eBooks through 360 Search federated search service

Other vendors are also offering this service, like the Ebsco A to Z list.

We have the Ebsco product at WSU and are electing to not display the ebooks at this time.  Our patrons use our A to Z list to locate electronic journals (which are also in our catalog), so I really don’t like to clutter the product with other formats, particularly since ebooks are a growing collection.  At some point the ebooks will outnumber the journals.

Does anyone know if Serials Solutions categorizes these formats so that they can easily be searched by journal, ebook, or database?  Ebsco A to Z does not currently do that.  If they did, I might consider adding the ebooks since I could default to a journals search on the patron screen, but have the ebooks and databases search available.

This arrived via email a couple hours after the post – thanks Serials Solutions, you guys are on the ball!

Sue -

One of my colleagues sent me a link to your blog post discussing the Serials Solutions eBook functionality, and I wanted to quickly follow-up to explain how our A-Z list works with regard to eBook content.

Currently, all of the library’s content is displayed together in a combined A-Z list for browsing purposes. For searching, however, there are content type selectors that are available, so that your patrons can specify which type of content they are searching for (Journal, eBook, Other, or ALL). It’s also possible to place “mini-search” boxes anywhere on your library website for the A-Z list that are tailored to one or more of the content types – this requires a little bit of programming work, but is relatively straightforward (there is an example on our Support Center forums that I can direct you to if you’d like to see how that works).

Sincerely,
Cliff Gilley
Product Manager – 360 Link/360 Core/E-Journal Portal
Serials Solutions

Reference Extract – the answer to a credible search engine?

OCLC, the University of Washington, and Syracuse University are working together to create a “credible” search engine, one that offers results with preference to sites selected by librarians.

According to the press release, “Reference Extract is envisioned as a Web search experience similar to those provided by the world’s most popular search engines. However, unlike other search engines, Reference Extract will be built for maximum credibility of search results by relying on the expertise of librarians. Users will enter a search term and receive results weighted toward sites most often used by librarians at institutions such as the Library of Congress, the University of Washington, the State Library of Maryland, and over 2,000 other libraries worldwide.”

I think this is a fabulous idea, despite what others might think about potential librarian bias, and hope these groups take this idea a few steps further.  Wouldn’t it be great if publishers, data aggregators, and libraries who maintain scholarly content could populate this engine with data from invisible web sources – like catalogs, databases, eBook platforms.  We could bridge the google gap and offer our patrons a true scholarly search engine.  Information industry vendors could advertise, link resolvers could be inserted based on general IP of the user, and librarians across the world could band together to offer a real time chat service on the engine.  Think of the money this could save us on metasearch tools! I know, dream on.�

ebrary’s new QuickView

According to an ebrary press release, they have launched their new QuickView.  QuickView “enables end-users to instantly view documents in many of the leading web browsers and even works on the iPhone. No software downloads or installations are needed.”  Groovy.  QuickView will not replace the existing Java Based Reader, it is offered in conjunction.

ebrary’s key features of QuickView:

    • Instant viewing and page flipping in a web browser
    • Relevancy ranking at the chapter level with links to specific sections
    • Navigate to search terms or specified pages
    • Search within documents for key words
    • View and navigate to highlights and notes created using an ebrary Reader
    • Multiple view magnifications

I’ll check this out at Charleston this week and give it a whirl on the iPhone.  Anxious to see how legible that will be!

Penguin and Ingram Digital, Partners

Ingram Digital will host, manage, and distribute ebook and audio book content for Penguin.  About 11,000 titles are currently available, with many more to follow.  For more info, see the press release.

penguin.gif

Penguin ebooks can be downloaded in Microsoft Reader, Adobe, or Palm formats.  In addition to lots of fiction, bestsellers, and self-help titles, they have about 300 reference titles, many of which are the “idiots” guides.

e-content will overtake traditional books in sales by 2018

Just one of the findings from the Frankfurt Book Fair survey of over 1,000 industry professionals.  All of the survey results are in the press release.

Here’s a snippet about the challenges, which I find interesting:

Challenges facing the industry

70 per cent of respondents may feel ready for the digital challenge, but industry professionals nevertheless recognised the need to work together to tackle certain issues. The following top four concerns will be discussed at length during this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair:

• copyright – 28 per cent – typical…
• digital rights management – 22 per cent  – Oh, that nasty DRM
• standard format (such as epub) – 21 per cent  – how about one platform while you’re at it
• retail price maintenance – 16 per cent – hopefully this will filter to library price maintenance too