Category Archives: Print on demand

Lessons Learned: The UNC Press ‘Long Civil Rights Movement’ pilot project summarized

Sylvia Miller, Project Director for “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement,” University of North Carolina Press has given me permission to post in entirety, the following.  It is a summary of the Long Civil Rights Movement pilot project, which took place over the past 14 months.

This post contains 4 sections:

1. Close of the online pilot
2. The expected, the unexpected, and in between
3. What did we learn?
4. What is next for the LCRM Project?

Coming soon:  A follow-up post on enhanced e-books Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Vook Explains Why $3, $4, or even $9.99 Isn’t Always the Best Price for an eBook – eBookNewser

Do e-Textbooks Help Students Save Money?

E-Textbooks: 4 Keys to Going All-Digital — Campus Technology

Time for book publishers to fight dirty – chicagotribune.com

Inkling Raises $17M for Digital Textbooks – Liz Gannes – Media – AllThingsD

Internet Public Library – eReader Resources

Project MUSE® – Project MUSE E-Mail Announcement Archive

Many people really don’t know what to do with ebooks | Christina’s LIS Rant

This Is Why We’ll Never Have Innovative E-Books | Epicenter | Wired.com

Why Did Facebook Buy an e-Book Publisher? – NYTimes.com

Ebooks now 15% of Simon & Schuster revenue – The Digital Reader

Mass Digitization: Aptara Digitizing 730,000 Pages of Content for SAGE’s New eBook Platform” « INFOdocket

The Good, the Bad, and the Sexy: Our Espresso Book Machine Experience « The Scholarly Kitchen

Kobo found a way around Apple’s rules – The Digital Reader

Direct-to-consumer – it’s the way to go | FutureBook

More signs that Sony is about to launch a new ereader model | TeleRead

Articles of Interest

Textbook Rentals Come to the Kindle: Probably Not a Money-Saver

E-books, Young Professionals, and Reinventing ALA | American Libraries Magazine

Amazon confirms Harry Potter e-books to be available for Kindle | TeleRead

Library of Alexandria makes 19,000 titles available on the Espresso Book Machine | TeleRead

Borders’ liquidation: Winners and losers – The Week

Japanese company shows off ebook vending machine | TeleRead

“School Libraries: What Next?” Ebook Project – Virtual Dave

Don’t blame ebooks for Borders’ demise | TeleRead

LJ And SLJ Announce Keynoter for Virtual Conference on Ebooks | The Digital Shift

Judge pressures writers, Google to settle books case – The Globe and Mail

What Borders Closure Means To Your Kobo Account – eBookNewser

Ebooks and libraries – a missed opportunity to evolve – FUMSI Article

Interview with DeGruyter CEO, Sven Fund, about DeGruyter eBooks

Yesterday I spoke with Dr. Sven Fund, the CEO of DeGruyter.  News to me, DeGruyter has been publishing for 262 years! We discussed DeGruyter’s ebook program including their e-ditions program.  E-ditions provides “on demand” requests for digital or print copies of thousands of backlist titles.  Listen to the interview here.

Over 30 interviews with librarians, publishers, aggregators, and others in the information industry are available on the NSR interviews page.

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading

CIL Conference – Ebook Publishing: Practices & Challenges

This panel discussion was moderated by Dick Kaser from Information Today.  Speakers included Ken Breen, EBSCO Publishing, Leslie Lees, ebrary, Bob Nardini, Ingram, and Mike Shontz, OverDrive.

Each panelist had 5 minutes to discuss who they serve and business models they offer.

Ken Breen, EBSCO Publishing

  • Ken reflected back to 1997 – common themes from back then – user interface, compatibility, digital rights, unauthorized access and copying, business models.
  • EBSCO Publishing acquired NetLibrary one year ago, the preview of eBooks on EBSCOhost is available now. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

US Justice Department and FTC looking into Apple’s subscription service; EU monitoring as well

What We Talk About When We Talk About Business Models – The Scholarly Kitchen

Sustainable Business Models for Open Textbooks

My experience with the Espresso Book Machine

Publishing CTOs Want Standard Formats – eBookNewser

The True Cost of Publishing on the Amazon Kindle

Global eReader Sales Expected To Grow To $8.2 Billion By 2014 – eBookNewser

The Kindle Will (Finally) Get Page Numbers

OERs: the good, the bad and the ugly

TOC – Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

Panelists:  Laura Baldwin, O’Reilly Media and Phil Ollila, Ingram

Laura – reality of our biz, print and retail is still the bulk of the business. Print erosion cost, shipping costs, printing expenses, safety stock, operating capital are all factors in the profit/loss of publishers.

Strategically they wanted to deplete the amount of inventory and instead, make content available anywhere/anytime in a variety of formats. People expect faster cycle times (and not only in production).

Freedom plan – determine how to spend the capital.  Offset/digital short run (much smaller print runs, focused on shelf space awareness), back it up with print-to-order, combined with great forecasting tools. Continue reading

Michigan and Kentucky University Presses Using Ingram’s CoreSource

Wow, University Presses are in the news this week.  This is the 5th press release I’ve gotten!

Ingram Content Group Inc., announced agreements with two notable university presses for e-content management. The University of Michigan Press and The University Press of Kentucky have selected Ingram’s digital asset management platform, CoreSource®, to archive and distribute materials to partners worldwide.

The University of Michigan Press, part of the University of Michigan Library, was founded 80 years ago and is a primary publishing unit of the University today.  The Press publishes materials in a wide range of humanities and social science disciplines. It recently launched its innovative University of Michigan Digital Humanities Series, which advances understanding of the dynamic relationships between humanities and digital technologies. The Press has a mission of using the best technology to disseminate the information it publishes as freely and widely as possible, while preserving the integrity of published scholarship.  To further its mission, the Press selected Ingram’s CoreSource® platform for digital file management and distribution of both frontlist and backlist titles.    Continue reading

Introducing SpringerBriefs, 50 – 125 page eBooks

Springer is launching a new product line SpringerBriefs. Featuring cutting-edge research and practical applications in compact volumes of between 50 and 125 pages, SpringerBriefs will be available as eBooks and in print.

SpringerBriefs will cover a wide range of content from professional to academic across a variety of subject areas including business and economics, computer science, human and behavioral sciences, life sciences, mathematics and physical sciences. Typical topics might include a report on state-of-the-art techniques, a snapshot of a hot or emerging topic, an in-depth case study or a presentation of core concepts for students.

Expert advisory boards and collaborations with academic societies will contribute to generating high-quality content. Streamlined publishing processes and accelerated schedules will take authors’ ideas to market more swiftly than with previous methods. The first titles are scheduled to release in November and December 2010.

All SpringerBriefs titles will be included in the Springer eBook packages that are delivered to libraries and institutions via SpringerLink. They will also be available for sale, through Springer’s retail partners, in print or as eBooks for around US$40−50. SpringerBriefs will also be available in print at lower prices through MyCopy, Springer’s print-on-demand program for registered patrons of libraries that subscribe to the Springer eBook Collections.