Category Archives: Print on demand

Introducing SpringerBriefs, 50 – 125 page eBooks

Springer is launching a new product line SpringerBriefs. Featuring cutting-edge research and practical applications in compact volumes of between 50 and 125 pages, SpringerBriefs will be available as eBooks and in print.

SpringerBriefs will cover a wide range of content from professional to academic across a variety of subject areas including business and economics, computer science, human and behavioral sciences, life sciences, mathematics and physical sciences. Typical topics might include a report on state-of-the-art techniques, a snapshot of a hot or emerging topic, an in-depth case study or a presentation of core concepts for students.

Expert advisory boards and collaborations with academic societies will contribute to generating high-quality content. Streamlined publishing processes and accelerated schedules will take authors’ ideas to market more swiftly than with previous methods. The first titles are scheduled to release in November and December 2010.

All SpringerBriefs titles will be included in the Springer eBook packages that are delivered to libraries and institutions via SpringerLink. They will also be available for sale, through Springer’s retail partners, in print or as eBooks for around US$40−50. SpringerBriefs will also be available in print at lower prices through MyCopy, Springer’s print-on-demand program for registered patrons of libraries that subscribe to the Springer eBook Collections.

Ingram to distribute Springer titles including POD

Ingram Content Group Inc. and Springer announced a new integrated distribution services model that combines traditional physical book fulfillment with single-copy print-on-demand solutions for Springer’s entire Americas publishing program.  According to PR sources for Ingram, the Springer $24.95 My Copy program will continue with this partnership.

From the press release:

Starting in the first quarter of 2011, Ingram Content Group will fully manage warehousing, fulfillment and print-on-demand for Springer using the new model. Ingram will hold Springer’s entire US inventory and as it sells down, Ingram will transition titles to print-on-demand when it makes the most economic sense. All fulfillment will come through Ingram.

As the need to invest in the future of content in its many forms becomes increasingly important, publishers are facing resource decisions unlike any before. They are exploring new ways to operate and shift investments once used for the cost of warehousing and returns to developing the most innovative content. By strategically combining traditional print publishing with virtual inventory and print on demand, Springer can concentrate its energy and resources on the future success of its company while assuring its authors and readers that its high quality content will always be widely available, also in print.

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion |

Libraries and the changing role of creators and consumers

A must read OCLC newsletter article written by Andy Havens and Tom Storey – Libraries and the changing role of creators and consumers.  Havens and Storey interviewed Catherine Mitchell from the California Digital Library and Andrew Pate of On-Demand Books.  Topics include:

  • the university as publishers
  • embedded librarians
  • library as publisher (espresso book machine)
  • libraries – searching globally and publishing locally

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

Student Public Interest Groups Lobby for Open Source Textbooks

An article in Inside Higher Education today discusses the Student PIRG (Public Interest Research Group) call to action for open textbook solutions.  It’s an interesting piece, demonstrating the need for cheaper textbook alternatives and the lack of faculty interest in open access books due to lack of quality and reliability.  The author compares the situation to health care stating, “Student PIRGs’ pushing for a plurality of professors to adopt open textbooks is like a health care lobbyist pushing for a plurality of doctors to adopt herbal medicine: interesting, maybe even compelling with the right evidence, but ultimately impractical.”

Self-Publishing Company, Infinity Publishing, to Distribute eBooks via SONY Reader Store

I’m posting this because the COSLA report and some of the speakers at the eBook Summit yesterday believe that libraries should become self-publishers in an effort to increase their viability in the community and bring the community to the 21st century world.  Infinity is a vibrant, self-publishing company.  Perhaps we can learn something or start collaborating with companies like Infinity Publishing.

Infinity Publishing, a pioneer in self-publishing, today announced that it has signed a distribution agreement with Sony to make Infinity eBooks available for purchase on Sony’s Reader Store™.

Infinity’s eBooks will now be available for sale on Sony’s Reader Store, from which readers can download eBooks in open-standard formats that can be viewed on various eBook reading devices, including Sony’s Reader. Continue reading Self-Publishing Company, Infinity Publishing, to Distribute eBooks via SONY Reader Store

New Articles of Interest

Standards & Best Practices – Identifiers – Roadmap of Identifiers …BISG

Video – Students Love AccessMyLibrary School Edition – Gale/Cengage

Hands-On with a New e-Reader –

Library Labs Turn to Their Patrons for Project Ideas – Wired Campus

Why Share Open Educational Resources? – College Open Textbooks Blog

Library can’t lend an eBook to Kindle user |

Xerox to sell and service Espresso Book Machines

Kobo announces WiFi ereader – faster processor, new screen

Ready to ditch paper? Here are the top 10 e-readers

Kno announces 14-inch single-screen tablet

Amazon Patent Could Charge For Browsing A Book Online – eBookNewser

Amazon launches “Kindle on the Web”

Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Yesterday at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion of the acquisition models of eBooks for academic libraries.  We chatted about business models, workflow issues and their opportunities and challenges, the pros and cons of electronic access,and the future of eBooks.  I was pretty busy doing my moderating duties and didn’t get a chance to summarize the program, but luckily some folks at LJ did.  Here is what they had to say: Continue reading Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Lightning Source Heads “Down Under”

News Release, September 22, 2010

NASHVILLE, TN – Ingram Content Group Inc. today announced it will expand its presence in the Asia-Pacific market by establishing a full-scale Lightning Source print-on-demand book manufacturing operation in Australia.

“The expansion of our Lightning Source global print solution into Australia is a significant step in the ongoing mission of Ingram Content Group to help content reach its destination swiftly and efficiently to retailers and readers worldwide,” said David “Skip” Prichard, President and CEO, Ingram Content Group.  “This expansion of Ingram’s global presence, from the United Kingdom to France and now Australia, provides publishers with expanded market reach and sales opportunities, as well as makes thousands of books available quickly and affordably to booksellers and their customers.” Continue reading Lightning Source Heads “Down Under”

Charleston Conference Program big on eBooks

The XXX Annual Charleston Conference, held in Charleston, S.C. November 3 – 6th, has just released it’s tentative program.  It’s loaded with discussions, papers, and panel presentations on e-books, patron driven acquisition, digital textbooks, and more.  I’ve listed a few of the sessions below, but for a closer look, check out the full program.  Early bird registration ends October 1st.

Wednesday, Nov. 3rd – Full Day Preconference – E-Everything: Putting It All Together (additional cost to attend)

THURS Lively Lunch 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM  Digital Warfare: Navigating the E-book Minefield Continue reading Charleston Conference Program big on eBooks