Category Archives: Print on demand

Articles of Interest

A Truly Bookless Library – Inside Higher Ed

IBooks App more popular than Facebook and Twitter

Finding the Best Way to Read Books on an iPad

How to Digitize Your Textbooks

E-reader roundup: 8 devices compete for the crown

Arizona State University Is Bringing Kindles And YA eBooks To Library

Dynamic Books, College Open Textbooks in Pact to Offer Affordable Textbooks

Espresso Book Machine poised to expand locations, COO Tom Allen says

A Review of NOOKStudy – ProfHacker

2/3 of e-book users still prefer reading on Kindle over iPad, survey says

Kindles and Coursepacks – Inside Higher Ed

Articles of Interest

iPad, Kindle, Nook or Sony? What is the best e-book reader?

Ebooks: The $100 Sweet Spot has been Reached

Another Press Stops Publishing – Inside Higher Ed

Project Gutenberg: Timeline Events

Moving Tales: Do Animated eBooks Have a Future?

Sony takes on Kindle with next-gen e-readers – CNET News

Espresso Book Machine Spreads to Bookstores

Copyright, Ebooks and the Unpredictable Future | Digital Book World

Should You Buy an E-Book? – WSJ.com

All In the Delivery – Inside Higher Ed

Notre Dame Launches EReader Study…in Thrive Michiana

eBooks in Higher Education, textbooks, rentals – great article

Great article today in Inside Higher Education, All in the Delivery, that discusses the rise of eBooks in higher education, specifically for textbooks.  Kindle, iPad, CourseSmart, FlatWorld Knowledge, and of course print, are discussed in the context of the best method for delivery of academic ebooks.  The author, Steve Kolowich, offers a nice overview and variety of stats and links.  The comments thus far are nice as well.

Google Editions: What We Know (and Don’t Know)

Eric Freese, and Aptara Solutions Architect, wrote an article for the Digital Book World blog yesterday, “Google Editions:  what we know and don’t know.”  In this article he discusses content, platforms, partners, EPUB, price, and the possibility of a “gpad” type tablet in the future.  Unfortunately, as the title suggests, there is much we don’t know about Google Editions, but the article is still a great summary.

New Articles of Interest

Each week the number of blog posts and articles relating to eBooks, publishing, and eReaders is on the rise.  This week was no exception.  Articles I am linking to focus on the use of readers in elementary schools and higher ed and how fast/slow reading is on devices, future of publishing and business models, textbook costs, and the new SONY reader library program.

Kindle and iPad Books Take Longer to Read than Print [STUDY]

The Hub: business model of the future for books and libraries?

The future of publishing(?) – Inside Higher Ed (POD at it’s finest, sp)

Step Too Far on Textbook Costs? – Inside Higher Ed

Department of Justice Takes On Kindle On Campus

Departments of Education and Justice Announce Continuing Commitment to Accessible Technology for All Students | U.S. Department of Education

Amy Chow NYC School Librarian Talks eBooks

Sony Launches Reader Library Program

Many library patrons prefer books to gadgets

Mad World of eBooks part one – ALA discussion

On Saturday morning at ALA, a group of librarians and publishers gathered together to discuss the world of eBooks, particularly aspects of consortial purchasing.  Each hour of the discussion a panel of publishers and librarians was on hand to lead the discussion.

The event was organized by Michael Zeoli at YBP, Julie Gammon at the University of Akron, and Tony Horava at OCUL.  Michael began the event with general slides about eBook and print book availability and sales.  He also offered a few anonymous comments from librarians.  I’ll try to get copies of his slides to post. Continue reading

Print on Demand and Open Access, A Booby Trap?

Interesting article in SSP”s Scholarly Kitchen by Joseph Espisito, “The POD Booby Trap and the Lure of Open Access Books.”  Espisito discusses “the booby trap” of open access, stating, “The unfortunate, unstated premise of those who fall into the POD booby trap is that they really don’t and can’t believe in the emerging primacy of digital text.  The trap is set for anyone who thinks that print is superior for enough readers to make print a long-term viable option.  This is highly doubtful.  E-books have already reached the tipping point.  In just a couple months, Apple has sold millions  of e-books from its online bookstore, millions that come on top of the tens of millions sold by Amazon for its Kindle and Stanza brands.  And Google Editions haven’t even launched yet.  No more make-believe.  If we want the cultural advantages of broad dissemination of scholarly texts through open access, then let’s step up and pay for it.  Authors, department heads, university provosts, granting agencies — all of these have a stake, or claim to, in the distribution of academic material.  Let the stakeholders fund the stake.”

Let the stakeholders fund the stake.  This sounds exactly like a plan that Frances Pinter from Bloomsbury Academic is trying to promote.  She spoke about it at the O’Reilly TOC conference and I had a follow up interview with her in March.  She’ll be keynoting on this exact topic at The Charleston Conference in November.

Ingram’s Lightning Source enhances features

Ingram Content Group’s Lightning Source POD has introduced several new features including: new color interior hardcover book options, additional trim sizes for black and white interior books, expanded page count options for both perfect bound and hardcover books and a multi-volume set option, commonly used in the academic sector.  Continue reading

Springer’s MyCopy Service now available in Europe

Springer has offered the MyCopy service in the US and Canada since 2008.  It was so successful, they are now expanding the service to European library users.  MyCopy offers a POD copy to users at $24.95.  More from Springer:

After the successful launch in the US and Canada, Springer Science+Business Media has extended its MyCopy service with immediate effect to library users in Europe.  In line with this service, all registered library patrons will be able to order a softcover copy of a Springer eBook for their personal use by clicking on a button on the Springer platform www.springerlink.com.  The softcover copies are priced at a flat fee of EUR 24.95, which includes shipping and handling within these European countries: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK. Continue reading