Category Archives: Publishing

New Articles of Interest

Each week the number of blog posts and articles relating to eBooks, publishing, and eReaders is on the rise.  This week was no exception.  Articles I am linking to focus on the use of readers in elementary schools and higher ed and how fast/slow reading is on devices, future of publishing and business models, textbook costs, and the new SONY reader library program.

Kindle and iPad Books Take Longer to Read than Print [STUDY]

The Hub: business model of the future for books and libraries?

The future of publishing(?) – Inside Higher Ed (POD at it’s finest, sp)

Step Too Far on Textbook Costs? – Inside Higher Ed

Department of Justice Takes On Kindle On Campus

Departments of Education and Justice Announce Continuing Commitment to Accessible Technology for All Students | U.S. Department of Education

Amy Chow NYC School Librarian Talks eBooks

Sony Launches Reader Library Program

Many library patrons prefer books to gadgets

LJ’s eBook Summit – September 29th

Mark your calendars for September 29th, the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – eBooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point.  This looks like it will be a fabulous event with great keynote speakers lined up and a diverse selection of panel discussions.  Ray Kurzweill, Kevin Kelly, and David Lankes are featured keynote speakers.  The breakout sessions will feature program tracks for school, public, and academic libraries.  The program is available online, and early bird registration for the VERY LOW price of $19.95 (librarians and students) ends on July 30th.   I’m sure this great price is thanks to the sponsors – OverDrive, Baker and Taylor, Capstone Digital, and Gale/Cengage.

Congrats LJ – this is a wonderful idea and I can’t wait to attend.

Reference Works From Idea to Reality – ALA Session Summary

This post was reprinted in full from the Points of Reference blog at Booklistonline.com.

Each year at the ALA Annual Conference, Booklist’s Reference Books Bulletin sponsors a program to discuss various topics related to reference and reference publishing.  This year RBB’s session focused on the process of creating a reference work, from idea to reality.  The speakers included Casper Grathwohl from Oxford University Press, Rolf Janke from SAGE Reference, and Frank Menchaca from Gale/Cengage.  The session was moderated by Sue Polanka, Chair of the RBB Editorial Board.  Each panelist provided a 15 minute presentation on a particular aspect of the publishing process and a general Q/A followed.  I’ll summarize the comments of each panelist below. Continue reading

Depts. of Education and Justice rule on Accessible Reading Devices

This posting is taken in full from a U.S. Dept. of Education Press Release.

Today, the Departments of Justice and Education announced the publication of a joint ‘Dear Colleague’ letter reaffirming the agencies’ commitment to ensuring students with disabilities have equal access to emerging technologies in institutions of higher education.

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the two departments share responsibility for protecting the rights of college and university students with disabilities. These landmark laws bar institutions of higher education from requiring the use of technology that is inaccessible to individuals with disabilities, unless the institutions provide accommodations or modifications that would permit an individual with a disability to use the technology in an equally effective manner. Continue reading

eBook platform comparison chart

I’m not sure how I didn’t find this earlier, but thanks to a colleague, Erik Christopher, I am now aware of the JISC eBook comparison chart. It is available on the JISC site at http://www.jisc-adat.com/adat/adat_ebooks.pl and offers a comparison of up to 7 different eBook platforms including:  Credo Reference, NetLibrary, ebrary, EBL, MyiLibrary, Dawsonera, and Taylor and Francis eBookstore.  Over 50 functional features are compared with basic Y/N responses including search, access control, search results, linking, restrictions, exporting, etc.  All data is supplied by the vendors.  They are obviously missing some reference eBook databases, so I hope Gale, SAGE, ABC-CLIO, Oxford, Rosen, and others can hop on board this chart.  If anyone is shopping for eBook platforms, or if publishers are considering launching an eBook site, this is a great place to go for ideas and industry standard features.

They also offer a comparison chart for scientific databases.

Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Each Friday before the ALA Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) gets together to have a program and discussion of issues surrounding reference publishing.  The ALA Annual meeting was no exception.  A large group of publishers and librarians gathered to figure out, “how did we get here?”  A panel of librarians, LIS instructors, reference contributors, and wholesalers, organized by Peter Tobey at Salem Press, presented some thoughts and challenges for reference content and reference publishing.  A summary of these comments is below.  The panelists included:  Buffy Hamilton, a teacher/librarian from Creekview H.S. in Canton, GA and blogger at The Unquiet Librarian and 1/4 blogger for Libraries and Transliteracy;  Sue Polanka (me);  Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean of the Madden Library, CSU – Fresno;  Bernadette Low, a frequent contributor to reference content from the Community College of Baltimore City;  William Taylor, Manager, Continuations iSelect (R) and Standing Orders at Ingram Content Group;  and Jessica Moyer, a doctoral candidate in literacy education at the U of Minnesota and instructor of a MLIS reference course. Continue reading

Mad World of eBooks – part three, ALA Discussion

See parts one and two of this session for more information.  The session was described by one of the speakers as “speed dating for eBooks”- evaluating the relationships between libraries, publishers, vendors.  Best thing I heard all day.

Group three – Becky Clark, Johns Hopkins, Alex Holzman, Temple UP, Rob Kairis and Kay Downey, OhioLINK Continue reading

Mad World of eBooks, part two – ALA discussion

For the introductory material on the session, please see part one of this blog post.

Second group – Lenny Allen, OUP, Erin Igoe, Cambridge UP, Tony Horava, OCUL, Joy Kirchner, COPPUL

  • Lenny – budget and workflow are concerns, always looking a year in advance.
  • Erin – CBO general ebook platform focused on perpetual access of titles; forthcoming developments – digital collections from Cambridge Libary, New Cambridge history of Islam; discussing the best use of delivering print materials in a digital format that will be most useful, relevant and user friendly.  Always looking at discoverability and functionality, they really want to be at the simultaneous release of p and e, it’s the workflow issue that is holding things up.  Lots of opportunities for ILL, PDA, metadata (better and more consistent fashion), use reports. Suggests that librarians keep pushing the envelope with publishers. Continue reading

Mad World of eBooks part one – ALA discussion

On Saturday morning at ALA, a group of librarians and publishers gathered together to discuss the world of eBooks, particularly aspects of consortial purchasing.  Each hour of the discussion a panel of publishers and librarians was on hand to lead the discussion.

The event was organized by Michael Zeoli at YBP, Julie Gammon at the University of Akron, and Tony Horava at OCUL.  Michael began the event with general slides about eBook and print book availability and sales.  He also offered a few anonymous comments from librarians.  I’ll try to get copies of his slides to post. Continue reading

Free Webinar: Finding the Value-Proposition for Digital Content

LEVERAGE: Finding the Value-Proposition for Digital Content

As the cost of instructional resources continues to raise issues for schools, colleges, students and parents, the impact of sharable digital resources on the overall cost of education is supposed to be significant.

Join the SREB Educational Technology Cooperative online at 11:00 am (PDT) on Tuesday, June 29, 2010, for a live webinar that looks at models and policies to leverage state, system, college and school investments in digital curricula and content.  The one-hour session will explore three perspectives that illuminate the issues and opportunities presented by “free” content.

To register for this webinar (it is free) click this link (http://leverage062910.eventbrite.com).   You will receive a link to the webinar approximately one week prior to the webinar.
Direct link to:  Elluminate room. (I think … but you should still register..)
We look forward to informing and improving your LEVERAGE! Continue reading