Category Archives: School Libraries

Booklist Online Articles Feature Follett, NetLibrary, and Overdrive

offtheshelf-f1.jpg Those of you interested in learning more about Follett and Overdrive should take a look at the recent  Off The Shelf column in Booklist Online - E-book Distributors for the Public and School Library Markets.  The article provides an overview of the content, features, and business models of both of these distributors.

NetLibrary, due to it’s recent transformation, has a feature article in the Nov. 1, 2008 Booklist issue (and Booklist Online)

Academic aggregators - ebrary, EBL, and Myilibrary – were featured back in May, 2008.

All articles are linked from No Shelf Required, just check out the articles link.

Infobase to release eBook platform this Fall

Attention public, school, and community college libraries.

Infobase, publisher for Chelsea House, Facts on File, Ferguson, and Bloom’s Literary Criticism will release it’s own eBook platform this Fall.  However, titles will still be available from previously established interfaces.

Current titles and backlist titles will be available at launch (1800+) and forthcoming titles will also come in e version.

Looks like the business model is similar to GVRL – unlimited simultaneous access and an archival PDF copy of each title purchased.  Which, leads me to believe this will NOT be a subscription product.  No word yet on pricing.

I’m hoping to get a sneak peek at the interface in the next couple of weeks, so details on the interface bells and whistles to follow.

OCLC and Recorded Books agree to new partnership through NetLibrary

OCLC and Recorded Books have signed an agreement under which Recorded Books eAudiobooks will continue to be available to libraries through NetLibrary.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Bob Murphy +1-614-761-5136
murphyb@oclc.org

Recorded Books will introduce new eAudiobook collections
to libraries through OCLC’s eContent platform

DUBLIN, Ohio, September 12, 2008—OCLC and Recorded Books have signed an agreement under which Recorded Books eAudiobooks will continue to be available to libraries through NetLibrary, OCLC’s platform for eContent.

Under the agreement, OCLC and Recorded Books will market Recorded Books eAudiobooks in North America and other regions around the world.  OCLC and Recorded Books will continue to offer eAudiobook subscriptions and will work together to deliver new products and packages to meet the needs of individual libraries and library groups.

OCLC and Recorded Books settled a contract dispute in November 2007 and agreed at that time that OCLC would market Recorded Books eAudiobooks through August 2008 and service contracts through August 2009.  The new agreement extends and expands the partnership.

“This new agreement will provide continuity to libraries that currently offer their patrons high-quality downloadable eAudiobooks from OCLC and Recorded Books,” said Chip Nilges, OCLC Vice President, Business Development.  “OCLC and Recorded Books are committed to providing libraries with outstanding new eContent services, plans and packages in a new user-friendly environment.”

In October 2008, OCLC plans to release the NetLibrary Media Center, a downloadable application that patrons and libraries will use to manage and access their content.  The new Media Center will offer personalization features and advanced search and browse capabilities.

“We are excited about the broad range of patron-friendly content which we will be able to offer libraries,” said Matt Walker, Recorded Books Vice President, Sales and Marketing.  “Our customers will benefit greatly from the partnership created by Recorded Books’ commitment to quality audio books and OCLC’s commitment to excellence in its digital products.”

Together, OCLC and Recorded Books provide eAudiobooks to more than 500 libraries and 16 library groups.

For more information about Recorded Books eAudiobooks from OCLC, send e-mail to libservices@oclc.org or customerservice@recordedbooks.com.

About OCLC

Founded in 1967 and headquartered in Dublin, Ohio, OCLC is a nonprofit library service and research organization that has provided computer-based cataloging, reference, resource sharing, eContent, preservation, library management and Web services to 60,450 libraries in 112 countries and territories.  OCLC and its member libraries worldwide have created and maintain WorldCat, the world’s richest online resource for finding library materials.  For more information, visit www.oclc.org.

OCLC NetLibrary provides content and technical delivery solutions to institutional libraries, corporations and government agencies that facilitate the purchase, management and distribution of research, reference, digital learning and general interest content via Web-based technologies.  NetLibrary’s eContent solution is the most broadly adopted in the market, making more than 170,000 eBooks, 6,000 eJournals, 7,500 eAudiobooks, and 83 databases available through more than 16,000 libraries worldwide. For more information, visit www.oclc.org/netlibrary/.

About Recorded Books

Recorded Books, a Haights Cross Communications company, produces and distributes unabridged audiobooks and other audio products to public and university libraries and schools, in cassette, CD, and downloadable formats.  Over 7,000 titles are available for adults, children, and young adults in English and Spanish languages narrated by professional, award-winning actors.  Recorded Books also distributes music, educational lectures, independent films, and nonfiction films on DVD.  Packaging is designed for high circulation. One-year warranty, cataloging, processing, and free MARC records are available.  For more information, visit www.recordedbooks.com.

International Children’s Digital Library – New Enhancements

International Children’s Digital Library Unveils Breakthrough Enhancements

From PRWeb

Unique Technology Significantly Improves Translation, Readability

Boston, MA (PRWEB) June 17, 2008 — The International Children’s Digital Library (ICDL) Foundation (www.childrenslibrary.org), which is the world’s largest collection of children’s literature available freely on the Internet, today announced the completion and implementation of its ClearText technology which significantly enhances the translation and readability of the books available from the online library.

For easier reading of scanned books on a small screen, ClearText allows the user to simply click the desired text to display a magnified version of that text in place, or to read that page in a different language, the user just selects the desired language from a list under the page. The novel book reader technology was developed in-house at ICDL by Dr. Ben Bederson, library co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, working closely with a team from the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the University of Maryland.

We are constantly working to expand the library and increase its relevance worldwide

For the translation feature, children reading at the ICDL can select the language of their choice at the bottom of each page. As for readability, the text provided by the ClearText technology is sharper than before and will “pop out” to enlarge as needed. Text can even be read with a screen reader to support visually impaired readers. The book reader allows users to see a different version of the text in place and enables the text size to be changed or read aloud using a standard screen reader. It works by visually removing the text from the original image of the book, and then using the Web browser to display the text on top of the image of the book.

Additionally, the ClearText technology allows for users of the library to have increased options in selecting a language in which to read a book. For example, thanks to ClearText, Croatian author Andrea Petrlik’s moving book The Blue Sky is currently available in three languages. In addition to the technology improvements, a massive translation project is currently underway, being conducted by more than 1,200 online volunteer translators. Once a book is translated, there is a second review to validate the translation and ensure accuracy.

“We are constantly working to expand the library and increase its relevance worldwide,” said Executive Director of the International Children’s Digital Library, Tim Browne. “The ClearText application was developed specifically for the ICDL and makes it possible for more children from more countries to enjoy more books. We are delighted to unveil what we view as our most significant advancement to date.”

Ohio eBook Project

The State Library of Ohio has a really neat eBook project for libraries of all types.  Here is an excerpt from their website:

The Ohio eBook Project is a multi—type library consortium that’s membership includes academic libraries, public libraries, school libraries and special libraries. This project allows Ohio libraries to affordably obtain a digital material collection.

Launched in 2005, this statewide project allows libraries to provide digital books (including eBooks and eAudiobooks), eVideo and eMusic to library customers at a considerable savings.

The State Library of Ohio is contracted with OverDrive, Inc. to make this project a reality. OverDrive is a well-known digital materials provider to libraries throughout the country. The State Library assumed the project’s start-up cost, purchases for the collection, and pays the monthly maintenance fee.

As of May 2008, over 11,834 unique library patrons have enjoyed the Ohio eBook Project holdings. The holdings include 6292 copies of 4395 individual titles of eAudiobooks, eBooks, eVideo, and eMusic.

eBooks and ILL, is there a solution?

I’ve been hearing lots of conversation about eBooks and the inability to use them for ILL requests.  With a shift in purchasing to electronic, how will this affect the ILL service? Should we be getting ILL rights with purchase?  How would that work in the world of authentication and proxy servers?  Are librarians thinking about ILL needs when purchasing electronic titles over print? What are your thoughts?

Sue

Greenwood Digital Collection

Greenwood Digital Collection
Review. First published November 1, 2006 (Booklist).

The Greenwood Digital Collection includes more than 3,500 titles from Greenwood, Praeger, and Libraries Unlimited—encyclopedias, biographies, dictionaries, and primary documents. About 25 percent of the titles are reference and cover a variety of topics and fields in more than 24 subject areas. Users can browse the collection by title, subject, or author or perform a quick or advanced search of the entire collection, subject area, or an individual title. The quick search feature,available on nearly every page, performs a phrase search on the full text in the title or the entire collection. A user-initiated Boolean search is also acceptable. The advanced search offers two options. The standard search, with drop-down menus, will search by keyword, author, title, and LC or Dewey classification number using the AND, OR, and NOT operators. The Boolean search offers a free-form Boolean search by keyword, title, or author and access to eight operators. Both offer limits by subject and date, with options to sort results. Results, ranked by the number of hits, highlight search terms within the text and may be sorted by date, author, or title.
Individual full-text entries are in html format as they would appear on a page in the printed book.At this level, the table of contents of the book and options to move or jump to corresponding pages in the book appear. Tables and charts, also in html, retain proper tabs and columns. Users also have options for customizing the font family and size for easier reading, accessing the citation (in MLA format) for the page they are using, and printing clean copies of the text. Up to 20 pages may be printed at one time. Currently, e-mail and mark, store, and download options are not available. Greenwood offers two unique features, My Bookshelf and My Bookmarks and Notes, each of which requires a user-initiated account. The former saves titles to a personal bookshelf for use later. The latter option allows users to bookmark a particular page and add annotations up to 1,000 characters. Greenwood is quite flexible with pricing models and offers permanent or annual pricing. Libraries that wish to own content may purchase titles individually or as packages. Prices are generally 10 percent above the print list price regardless of institution size. There is also a $200 annual access fee per institution. – Sue Polanka