Category Archives: Surveys/Statistics

JISC launches new study on the challenge of ebooks in academic institutions

JISC recently announced a new research study on the challenge of eBooks in academic institutions.  A project wiki has been established by the team, of which I am honored to be a member.  I am posting with permission, the first entry on the site. Please check the wiki for periodic updates.

Today we kick off our ebook project for the JISC: ‘The challenge of ebooks in academic institutions.’ The project will run through August, September and October 2012. The project web site (wiki) has been set up and is organised around the key tasks or strands of the project. It’s only day one of the project so the wiki is sparse.  We have made a start on pulling a few references together with extracts to indicate why we think they are relevant to our project. If you have any suggestions do get in touch. There is also a page on the project team.  Some of our team worked together on a previous project on ebooks – ‘The Role of Metadata in the Discovery, Selection and Acquisition of e-Books’ –in the context of patron (or demand) driven acquisitions (PDA/DDA). Continue reading

Scholarly eBooks: Understanding the ROI for Libraries, a Springer White Paper

Springer, in collaboration with PCG (Publishers Communication Group) released a white paper, Scholarly eBooks: Understanding the Return on Investment for Libraries, today.  It is available for a free download from the Springer site.

The following is the introduction:  The Return on Investment (RoI) of scholarly eBooks in research and academic libraries can be difficult to determine, as the factors considered can vary from library to library, or even from person to person. RoI can be defined as a performance measure used to quantify and evaluate the efficiency of an investment in library resources or to compare efficiency among different investments. While it may seem simply to be a question of money in versus money out, the real difficulty of expressing the overall value of this resource for an institution comes from many contributing factors:

  • Time saved by library staff and researchers
  • Convenience of constant access and online search capabilities
  • Effect on research output and teaching
  • Physical space saved in the library by using electronic resources Continue reading

IMLS grant awarded to OCLC to study challenges PL face in providing eBook content

From an OCLC press release:

DUBLIN, Ohio, July 10, 2012—The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded a $99,957 grant to OCLC for a new initiative, “The Big Shift: Advancing Public Library Participation in Our Digital Future.” The purpose of the grant is to more fully understand the challenges that U.S. public libraries face in providing e-book content to borrowers, as they ensure that all Americans continue to have access to commercially produced content through their local public libraries, even as formats change.

OCLC will partner with the American Library Association (ALA) and the Public Library Association (PLA) to review the e-book landscape and jointly develop recommendations for managing the e-book environment, in order to ensure adequate public access to these emerging resources. Continue reading

ALA OITP releases backgrounder document on eBooks and libraries

reprinted from the District Dispatch:

As part of the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy’s work with the Digital Content and Libraries Working Group, several member leaders have requested we develop and distribute communications resources that will support local libraries around digital content issues.

Today OITP released the first of these documents, a backgrounder (pdf) that shares some highlights from the newest Pew Research Center report on “Libraries, Patrons, and E-books,” along with some possible messaging and local angles for leveraging this new research with local media and decision makers.

Among the report’s key findings referenced in the backgrounder:

  • 12% of e-book readers have borrowed an e-book from their library
  • 62% of people don’t know they can borrow e-books from their library
  • 69% of people report the library is important to them and their family
  • Many people would like to learn more about borrowing e-books
  • E-book borrowers appreciate the selection of e-books at their local library, but they often encounter difficulty borrowing Continue reading

SAGE and LISU report on demonstrating library value released

SAGE released the results of a six month research project on demonstrating library value.  More below from the press release.

Los Angeles, CA (18 June, 2012) – Providing evidence of value remains an elusive goal for academic libraries across geographic borders, according to a new report published today.  The findings are the results of a six-month research project commissioned by SAGE, which sets out recommendations for academic libraries to enhance their working relationship with academic teaching and research staff. ‘Working together: evolving value for academic libraries’ was undertaken by LISU, a national research and information centre based in the Department of Information Science at Loughborough University (UK).

Findings from three geographic areas, the United States, United Kingdom and Scandinavia, indicated that there is no systematic evidence of the value of academic libraries for teaching and research staff. Despite this, librarians noted that they receive positive feedback about the support the library provides, but there is a perception that academic staff do not really know how to use all that the library can offer. Continue reading

Self Publishing fuels steady title growth in 2011

From a Bowker press release.  Lots of interesting data here about title output from 2011.

June 5, 2012 (New Providence, NJ) — Bowker, the global leader in bibliographic information, released its annual report on U. S. print book publishing for 2011, compiled from its Books In Print® database. Based on preliminary figures from U.S. publishers, Bowker is projecting that traditional print book output grew six percent in 2011, from 328,259 titles in 2010 to a projected 347,178 in 2011, driven almost exclusively by a strong self-publishing market. This is the most significant expansion in more than four years for America’s traditional publishing sector, but removing self-publishing from the equation would show that the market is relatively flat from 2010.

“Transformation of our industry has brought on a time of rich innovation in the publishing models we now have today. What was once relegated to the outskirts of our industry—and even took on demeaning names like ‘vanity press’ is now not only a viable alternative but what is driving the title growth of our industry today,” said Kelly Gallagher, Vice-President, Bowker Market Research. “From that standpoint, self-publishing is a true legitimate power to be reckoned with. Coupled with the explosive growth of e-books and digital content – these two forces are moving the industry in dramatic ways.” Continue reading

ALA releases E-Content: The Digital Dialogue

Available online now!
E-Content: The Digital Dialogue

This digital supplement addresses critical issues related to ebooks, e-content, digital literacy, and more! You can read it online or pick up one of a limited supply of print copies at the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim—pick yours up at Office for Information Technology Policy programs and in the ALA Membership Pavilion.

American Libraries Digital Supplement

What you’ll find inside:

  • ALA´s Digital Content and Libraries Working Group cochairs, Sari Feldman and Robert Wolven,summarize recent ebook activities and suggest directions for the future.
  • Deborah Caldwell-Stone from the Office for Intellectual Freedom focuses on ebook privacy and related ethical issues.
  • James LaRue offers perspectives from a reader, librarian, publisher, writer, and bookseller on ebooks today and tomorrow.

You can read this supplement in the easy-to-use Zmag web browser format, or download it as a PDF for offline reading. Click here to get started.

ebrary survey suggests student use of ebooks stronger in the UK

From an ebrary press release:

May 8, 2012 – Palo Alto, CA, USA – Students in the United Kingdom who recently participated in ebrary’s Global Student E-book Survey reported a greater preference for digital over printed books and higher usage than their global counterparts in a similar survey conducted in 2011.  When asked how often they would choose e-books over printed books, 58% of UK students stated they would “very often” to “often” choose the digital version if it were available compared to 48% of global respondents.  Over 85% of UK students indicated they use e-books up to 10 hours per week and only 10% stated that they never use e-books.  In contrast, 52% of global participants indicated they use e-books up to 10 hours per week, and another 46% stated they never use e-books.  Approximately 5% of UK students indicated they use e-books more than 10 hours per week compared to 2% of global respondents. Continue reading

Library Journal’s 2012 eBook survey now open through June 30, 2012

Library Journal invites you to participate in our 2012 ebook survey. We want to hear from all U.S. public, academic and school libraries, even if your library currently has no ebook collection. Every person who completes the survey will be entered into a drawing to win an Apple iPad!

This research will allow libraries to cite persuasive data when engaged in conversations with library stakeholders, publishers and library vendors. Results from the LJ/SLJ ebook surveys conducted over the last two years revealed:

  •  The availability of ebooks in public libraries increased from 72% to 82% nationally between 2010 and 2011.Ebook circulation increased 108% over the same time period.
  • In 2011, approximately 4% of public libraries’ materials budgets was spent on ebooks.
  • Almost all (95%) of academic libraries offered ebooks to users in 2011 with the average number of ebook titles available practically doubling from the previous year to 65,000. Ebooks represented almost 9% of materials budgets in 2011.
  • School libraries saw the most movement on ebook adoption last year, up to 44% in 2011 from 33% in 2010. The number of ebooks available to students/faculty jumped 700% to almost 400 titles in 2011.
  • The prevalence of library-owned ereading devices for student usage was 17% with over a third of remaining school libraries considering them. Continue reading

OverDrive announces a series of “Big Data” reports

From an OverDrive press release:  Cleveland, Ohio, April 11, 2012 – OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) will announce at the London Book Fair (Booth X700) April 16-18, the first of a series of “Big Data” reports analyzing billions of eBook impressions and other data collected from across its network of 18,000 public and school libraries.  Data from OverDrive’s global library network to be made available to participating libraries and publishers includes information about eBook and digital audiobook title circulation, book demand and holds as well as web traffic and general demographics.  OverDrive’s data reports were developed in compliance with library privacy policies and do not include any identifying user information. Continue reading