Category Archives: Vendor News

Gale offers free access to Women’s History web site

From a Gale/Cengage email I received:

Free Access on our Women’s History Web site
From women in politics to women in the environment, start planning your Women’s History Month events now with great resources from Gale.Farmington Hills, Mich., Feb. 17, 2009 – In recognition of Women’s History Month in March, Gale, part of Cengage Learning, is offering free resources and activities on its Women’s History Month Web site.
Supporting the theme “Get to Know the Women Who’ve Changed Our World,” the Women’s History Month Web site is accessible at http://www.gale.com/free_resources/whm/ and offers free resources including activities, quizzes, biographies, a timeline, links and more to complement classroom topics.
Activities & Ideas
The site includes activities that can make Women’s History Month more meaningful.  Activities are arranged by topics and include history, geography, music, science, literature and a number of other categories, showing the influence of women in those areas.   New downloadable bookmarks, calendar and screensaver are also available.
Weekly Quiz
One of the most used and enjoyed features of the Web site is the quiz.  Each week, a new quiz based on women throughout history and their achievements will be posted.
Examples of the types of questions:
She helped bring provisions to soldiers on the front lines and set up the Bureau of Records. She is:
Clara Barton
Florence Nightingale
Jane Addams
Best known for her series of well-loved children’s books, this writer published her first book at the age of 65. Her books, still popular today, are autobiographical tales of her own childhood as a pioneer girl.
Jane Austen
Laura Ingalls Wilder
J. K. Rowling
(Correct answers are Florence Nightingale and Laura Ingalls Wilder)
Biographies
From women of the past like Abigail Adams and Joan of Arc, to present day notables including Hillary Clinton and Michelle Obama, biographies of many influential women are included in the site’s biographies section (http://www.gale.com/free_resources/whm/bio/).  Each entry gives detailed information including birth date and location, details on personal life and career, and resources for further information.
For the Classroom
Free lesson plans, activities to engage students and the latest Gale tools for the classroom are available at Galeschools.com.
Featured Titles
Visit http://www.gale.com/free_resources/whm/featured_titles/ for a list of Gale titles that will help students gain a deeper appreciation for Women’s History.
Timeline
The timeline available at http://www.gale.com/free_resources/whm/timeline/ features milestones in women’s history from ancient times through the present, commemorating such events as Queen Isabella creating a unified Spain, Susan B. Anthony crusading for women’s rights and the founding of fashion magazine Elle.
Links
Click on http://www.gale.com/free_resources/whm/links/ for links to other Web pages created by and for women and girls.

For more information, please contact Linda Busse at linda.busse@cengage.com.

New audio interview – Leslie Lees, ebrary

A new audio interview has been posted to NSR’s interviews page.  This one features Leslie Lees, VP-Content and Market Development, ebrary.  Leslie and I discussed methods of ebook purchasing that involve patrons and what ebrary is doing to plan for these new business models.  Check it out, it’s absolutely the best thing you’ll hear all week!

NSR interviews are generally 15 – 20 minutes in length.  I recommend you download the mp3 file, then listen.

ebrary Creating Patron Driven Purchasing Model

At the ALAMW Conference I sat in on a brainstorming session with ebrary folks and about 50 librarians.  The topic was patron driven/initiated purchasing models.  ebrary is in the beginning stages of creating a model and wanted to get feedback from librarians.  Some common themes that came up included:

budgets – librarians weary of budget control, who has the right to buy, how to budget, which budget, and what happens when we run out of money, is the service turned off?

access – when is the book purchased? first click, after 5/10 minutes?  how much “free” time does a user have to browse a title before they decide to access/pay for it? is it just one user or simultaneous, and how does price change that?

usage – what type of usage statistics will be available?  these will be important to analyze the cost effectiveness of this program.  can we get usage stats on printed pages? downloads? pages viewed? and, what consitutes a “usage” in terms of purchasing the ebook?

ILL – purchasing ebooks essentially means we no longer have ILL rights.  So, will ebrary work this model into consortial agreements or could ILL fees be instituted?

pay per view/rent-to-own – paying a smaller fee to use the ebook one time, two times, etc. If the book price is reached, the library would own it, if not, its a cheaper way to provide access to many more titles.  Librarians were concerned about spending money on intangible items and how to educate the auditors and penny pinchers about this new model.

Thanks to ebrary, I was able to get some comments from one of the moderators.

Allen McKiel, Dean of Library and Media Services at Western Oregon University summarized his thoughts on one of the ebrary Patron Driven Models sessions.  He said:

I heard librarians flirting with pay-per-view in a number of their comments as Leslie plied them with leading questions. The responses labored around a mixed subscription/pay-per-some-features model until patrons had encumbered a charge that was equal to the price of the book, in which case the library would then ‘own’ the book. Librarians find it hard to realize that e-books no longer require charging structures that are based in physical objects. The conversation from my hearing leaned toward resolution in a pay-per-view model. Five hands shot up when Leslie asked if anyone was interested in pay-per-view. Then he dropped the subject and never went back to it. I think librarians may finally be ready to talk about pay-per-view as a real option. Pay-per-view compliments research and educational environments. Discovery and learning are facilitated by access to information particularly information that is produced by the academy. Pay-per-view would optimize access and thereby facilitate research, the production of information, and learning. Publishers would provide an editorial selection role based in their being able to identify resources that researchers and students would find useful since they would receive compensation for their service proportional to use of their publications by faculty and students.

I think publishers have a window of opportunity to develop access to everything on a pay-per-view model that can evolve gradually using a mixed subscription/pay-per-view model. A variety of collections available through subscription/pay-per-view would permit reasonable access to a variety of academic institutions at affordable prices that would also permit reasonable profit margins for publishers. It would also permit publishers to experiment with models that would optimize their revenue while simultaneously optimizing access for all students and faculty. Library budgets that are driven more directly by faculty and student use would be more likely to increase than budgets dependent upon librarian requests.

NetLibrary titles now available on Sony Reader

Sony teams with NetLibrary to offer digital editions and Readers
By Paul Biba

Sony is continuing to market its reader to more and more outlets. That’s only good for e-books as a whole.

In addition to the deal with Harlequin, Sony just announced a collaboration with NetLibrary:

images.jpgThe program includes a Reader model PRS-505, a collection of titles from leading publishers and all required licenses. Using the library’s PC, librarians can download a mobile collection title or titles from the NetLibrary site to the Reader as necessary.

Libraries that purchase Mobile Collections will be able to offer their patrons the ability to check out Readers for onsite or offsite use, depending on the policy established by each library. Collections, selected by NetLibrary’s collections librarian, include Career Development and Business Self Help (30 titles), Management and Leadership (22 titles), Popular Fiction (29 titles), Romance (19 titles) and Young Adult Fiction (24 titles).

Circulating Reader units through OCLC’s newly established program is just one way libraries are able to offer eBooks to their communities and expose people to electronic reading. Thousands of public libraries in the United States already offer online collections that patrons can borrow, typically for two to three weeks. eBooks are offered in the Adobe PDF format and it is expected that the recently established EPUB format will become common.

Sony Teams with NetLibrary to offer digital editions and Readers

From www.teleread.org

Sony teams with NetLibrary to offer digital editions and Readers
By Paul Biba

Sony is continuing to market its reader to more and more outlets. That’s only good for e-books as a whole.

In addition to the deal with Harlequin, Sony just announced a collaboration with NetLibrary:

images.jpgThe program includes a Reader model PRS-505, a collection of titles from leading publishers and all required licenses. Using the library’s PC, librarians can download a mobile collection title or titles from the NetLibrary site to the Reader as necessary.

Libraries that purchase Mobile Collections will be able to offer their patrons the ability to check out Readers for onsite or offsite use, depending on the policy established by each library. Collections, selected by NetLibrary’s collections librarian, include Career Development and Business Self Help (30 titles), Management and Leadership (22 titles), Popular Fiction (29 titles), Romance (19 titles) and Young Adult Fiction (24 titles).

Circulating Reader units through OCLC’s newly established program is just one way libraries are able to offer eBooks to their communities and expose people to electronic reading. Thousands of public libraries in the United States already offer online collections that patrons can borrow, typically for two to three weeks. eBooks are offered in the Adobe PDF format and it is expected that the recently established EPUB format will become common.

ALAMW Technology Showcase

Those of you heading to Denver this weekend might want to check out several of the vendors presentations in the Technology Showcase (Show floor, aisle 800 or 2200).  The event is Monday, January 26th from 10:00 to 1:00.  Here are several eBook related vendors and times:

Credo Reference – 11:20 – 11:50 Pueblo Theater (aisle 800)

ebrary – 10:40 – 11:10 – Mesa Theater (aisle 2200)

Springer 12:40 – 1:10 – Mesa Theater (aisle 2200)

EBL ebooks can now be loaded on Sony Reader

From the new EBL blog:

Sony Reader and Adobe announced the release of Digital Editions firmware which can be loaded onto the Sony Reader PR505 and the new PR700.  As EBL download uses Adobe Digital Editions, EBL ebooks can now be loaded onto Sony Reader devices.

You can read more about the software and how to get it to work on the Sony Reader here…

http://blogs.adobe.com/digitaleditions/2008/07/sony_505a_firmware_released_1.html

EBL is one of the only major ebook providers which enables downloading to Adobe Digital Editions and so is among the first to be able to offer downloads to reader devices!

Overdrive Promises more Content, Less DRM

From the TeleRead blog:
OverDrive: ‘Much more content without DRM’ promised for libraries in ‘09
By David Rothman

image Again and again I’ve asked the IDPF to please consider a logo for DRMless ePub books. OverDrive founder Steve Potash is also president of the IDPF, and recently he told Library Journal:

“OverDrive is the leader in bringing downloadable MP3 audiobooks to libraries. [It] is leading the library market in bringing all formats of digital media to readers—including much more content without DRM during 2009.”

I hope that includes copyrighted e-books, too, not just MP3. Like Steve, I’m keen on writers and publishers getting paid, and there are ways for this to happen without DRM. For now, I’ll regard the above statement as indicating at least some flexibility.

Meanwhile check out other comments in the LJ piece, headlined Apple’s DRM News said to have little effect on libraries for now.

(Thanks to Ed Klopek.)

ebrary now has on demand MARC records

From ebrary:

ebrary Announces On-Demand MARC Records

January 6, 2009 – Palo Alto, CA – ebrary®, a leading provider of e-content software and services, today announced that customers can now immediately upload free MARC records for individual titles they purchase as well as e-books and other documents added to the company’s subscription databases.  Additionally, ebrary’s new MARC features make it easier for customers to manage MARC records and upload large batches.

“As well as providing our customers with the best possible technology for acquiring, sharing, and distributing authoritative digital content, we also strive to provide support and services that make it easier for librarians and information professionals to use and integrate our products,” said Neal Strickberger, ebrary’s Vice President of MIS and Customer Operations. “In gathering feedback from our customers, we heard loud and clear that developing a quicker, more efficient way to obtain and manage MARC records would greatly enhance our offerings.  We are pleased to make this request a reality through on-demand MARC features.”

Available today, ebrary’s on-demand MARC features offer the following capabilities:

* Instant MARC updates – Customers can download new MARC records for purchased titles and additions to subscription e-book collections at any time, as incremental or complete record sets.
* MARC records separated by collection – Customers with multiple subscription collections and purchased titles can download complete or incremental sets of MARC records for specific collections.
* Deleted MARC records – Customers can now obtain deleted records as MARC delete records or on an Excel spreadsheet.
* Complete MARC record sets for large collections – To simplify loading, complete MARC loads are now available from ebrary’s extranet site as batches of 5,000 in a single ZIP file.

About ebrary (www.ebrary.com)
ebrary® is a leading provider of e-content services and technology.  The company helps libraries, publishers, and other organizations disseminate valuable information to end-users, while improving end-user research and document interaction.

The company has developed a flexible e-content platform, which customers may use in a number of different, integrated capacities:  ebrary customers may purchase or subscribe to e-books and other content under a variety of pricing and access models, and they may license the ebrary platform to distribute, sell, and market their own content online.  All options are delivered using a customizable interface and include a choice of ebrary Readers with QuickView™ for instant viewing in a browser and  InfoTools™ software which provide contextual searching and integration with multiple online resources..

ebrary currently offers a growing selection of more than 170,000 e-books and other titles from more than 300 leading publishers and aggregators.

Founded in 1999, ebrary is privately held and is headquartered in Palo Alto, CA, USA.

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Tish Wagner
ebrary
Library and Public Relations
707-963-2035- office
707-227-0870- mobile
tish.wagner@ebrary.com