Tag Archives: ACRL

Interview with Eric Frank, Flat World Knowledge

Last week while at ACRL, I moderated a session on the role of the academic library with the adoption of digital textbooks.  Eric Frank, Co-Founder and President of Flat World Knowledge, was on the panel.  We had a chance to talk afterward about the Flat World Knowledge product and business model and the future of the digital textbook.  Eric’s interview and 30+ others are available on the interviews page.

Google Books, links to letters, objections/responses

Here’s a link to the letter sent to the DOJ from the Exec Dir’s of ALA/ACRL/ARL on December 15th, outlining concerns of pricing and the lack of academic representation on the Registry Board.

And another link for the NY Law School document outlining the objections and responses in the amended settlement.

Comments on Google Book Search Settlement Coming to a Head (Again)

Ah, it is the beginning of September when thoughts turn to going back to school, the days turn a little colder (in the northern hemisphere) and the smell of lawsuit briefs is in the air. Well, okay — the latter might not be what you expect, but this is a special September, after all. Postponed from MayL1, the deadline for filing comments in the Google Book Search settlement is coming up. And everyone is weighing in (”again” for some) on the details of the settlement. A couple of highlights.

The American Library Association (ALA), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL)L2 again offered its support for the settlement, if only the court would promise to extend vigorous oversight of pricing and privacy practices of Google and the Books Rights Registry. This came in the form of a supplemental filingL3 to the briefL4 the three organizations filed in MayL5 (just prior to the first comment deadline). Continue reading

The Google Book Scanning Project: Issues and Updates – EDUCAUSE Webinar Summary

Sat in on the EDUCAUSE webinar on the Google Book scanning project.  The speakers were

Jonathan Band
Counsel, Library Copyright Alliance
Dan Clancy
Engineering Director, Google Book Search Continue reading

eBook Platform Evaluation Criteria

While at ACRL, I met a Librarian at Wellesley College by the name of Deborah Lenares.  She was in the midst of evaluating ebook aggregator platforms and shared with me her comparative spreadsheet.  It’s quite thorough and I thought it could be a great community project to work on it together.  So, Deborah has posted this spreadsheet to google docs and it is open and available for editing by anyone.

Document is available here:  https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AtHuZMbGK8S1dGpsZHdhYmZsLUhqbW50STZlcTZPT3c&hl=en_US#gid=0

The University of California – Irvine also did a comparison spreadsheet.  It is available for download here:  http://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2010/01/06/checklist-for-evaluating-patron-driven-business-models/

Finally, the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in the United Kingdom maintains an academic database assessment tool for e-books.  Users select vendors and the comparison data is displayed based on user choice.  It is available here:  http://www.jisc-adat.com/adat/adat_ebooks.pl

Google Book Search Settlement

Posting on behalf of Peter Murray, OhioLINK, full post at:  http://dltj.org/article/gbs-summary/

Today was to be the deadline for objecting to, opting out of, and/or filing briefs with the court on the Google Book Search Settlement. That was the plan, at least, when the preliminary approval statement from the court was issued last year. That deadline changed, and that is part of a recent flurry of activity surrounding the proposed Settlement. In honor of the original deadline, this e-mail provides a summary of recent news and an index of documents that you might want to read for more information. Continue reading

Patron Initiated Purchasing at ACRL

Thanks to the 100+ Librarians who attended our ACRL session on Patron Initiated Purchasing.  During the presentation, Alice and I surveyed the attendees, using audience response systems.  These results have been posted to the ACRL Virtual Conference.  In a nutshell:

85% of you have collection development responsibilities

94% purchase ebooks

61% were familiar with patron driven/patron initiated models

13% already use it, 68% are interested, and only 2% would not use it, the rest were uncertain

Reasons for using patron driven/patron initiated models include:

save time 11%, increase usage 25%, give patrons choices 25%, just in time resources 27%, provide chapters 11%

We had a great Q/A discussion afterwards as well.  During this I mentioned several resources on the blog.  They are linked here:

article on ebook pricing

article on Patron Driven Acquisition

Poll on PDA – currently on the homepage of the blog

interviews with publishers, aggregators, librarians

Glad you could attend.

Sue Polanka, Alice Crosetto,with Kari Paulson (President, EBL)