Tag Archives: ALA

EQUACC issues interim report

The Equitable Access to Electronic Content (EQUACC) Task Force met for the first time at a meeting held at ALA Midwinter and had a more substantive session at a one-and-a-half day retreat at the Washington Office, March 7-8, 2011.  The retreat happened to coincide with the announcement that HarperCollins would limit loans for its e-books.  Throughout the retreat, the significance of the HarperCollins decision factored into most of the discussions.  In addition to addressing this timely issue, the Task Force made significant progress toward identifying challenges and solutions for improved electronic access, use, distribution, and preservation.  The Task Force focused on long-term strategic issues given that there could easily be a situation similar to the HarperCollins decision in the future and ALA must be prepared to respond effectively.

The interim report is available here.

Gale offering free access to six resources for National Library Week

Gale, part of Cengage Learning, is celebrating National Library Week by offering free access to six highly-praised online resources for use by any library during National Library Week.  Free access runs through National Library Week, from April 10 to April 24, 2010. Librarians can download the widget to their homepage by visiting www.gale.cengage.com/NLW starting on April 10. Library patrons should look for the widget on their library’s homepage, which provides single-click access to these online resources.

The library is where stories are read, retold, written and created every day. In salute of the American Library Association’s theme – Create your own story @ your library, Gale is offering free access to resources that help library users explore and inspire stories of all kinds. Gale is offering access to six resources: Continue reading

ALA’s EQUACC Task Force Web Site Launches

ALA’s EQUACC, Presidential Task Force on Equitable Access to Electronic Content has launched a website, available at http://www.equacc.ala.org/

They are offering a discussion forum, comprehensive list of resources arranged by theme, and an option for RSS feeds or a subscription via email.

Check it out, stay informed, be vocal, support the cause!

CIL Conference – Ebook Publishing: Practices & Challenges

This panel discussion was moderated by Dick Kaser from Information Today.  Speakers included Ken Breen, EBSCO Publishing, Leslie Lees, ebrary, Bob Nardini, Ingram, and Mike Shontz, OverDrive.

Each panelist had 5 minutes to discuss who they serve and business models they offer.

Ken Breen, EBSCO Publishing

  • Ken reflected back to 1997 – common themes from back then – user interface, compatibility, digital rights, unauthorized access and copying, business models.
  • EBSCO Publishing acquired NetLibrary one year ago, the preview of eBooks on EBSCOhost is available now. Continue reading

ALA President Responds to Restrictions on E-book Lending

Reprinted in full from an ALA email and press release:
Dear Members,
First and foremost, I want to thank you for your patience. I held back on a public statement on the recent decision by Harper Collins to restrict the lending of e-books until the Equitable Access to Electronic Information Task Force (EQUACC) met last week. Please know that I heard your voices of concern about the impact of additional costs on your libraries and ability to meet the needs of the communities you serve. A press release was issued today that speaks to our shared alarm at announced and potential limitations to the access to knowledge, information and the creative written works of authors in the electronic era. We know that libraries are essential to an informed nation and therefore our democracy. I have been and will continue to highlight our commitment to access in every media interview I give. Continue reading

ALA Task Forces To Tackle E Challenges

From the ALA Washington Office website:  Recent action from the publishing world in the e-book marketplace has re-ignited interest and sparked many questions from librarians, publishers, vendors, and readers. Two ALA member task forces – the presidential task force on Equitable Access to Electronic Content (EQUACC) and the E-book Task Force – were recently created to address these complex and evolving issues.  EQUACC met this week in Washington, D.C., to provide ALA with guidance and recommendations for a coordinated ALA response to the challenging issues. Continue reading

eBooks and Maritime History – see and hear it at ALAMW

Peter McCracken, librarian and founder of Serials Solutions, has a new hobby – ships.  His site, ShipIndex.org, helps people do research on hundreds of thousands of specific vessels. With over 1.5 million citations in it, the site tells you what books, journals, CD-ROMs, websites, databases, and other sources mention particular ships. It includes vessels mentioned in references sources like the Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History (a 2008 Dartmouth Award Winner), Naval Warfare: An International Encyclopedia, and others. It currently includes the contents from about 170 books, and whenever possible, it links to an electronic version of those books via Google Books. The team is working with several online reference publishers to incorporate links between their products, helping people discover references to ships in online databases, and helping people working in online databases to learn more about the ships mentioned there. Continue reading

Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets

A must read post from the Librarian in Black blog, Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets, offers a summation from 3 speakers at this event held in San Francisco on September 21st.  They include Paul Sims, Ann Awakuni, and Henry Bankhead.

A few clips from the post:

Paul Sims, “He believes that eBooks have the potential to disrupt our ability to provide access to collections. He quoted the ALA Core Value about Access: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” eBooks are preventing us from meeting this core value.” Continue reading

66% of Public Libraries in US offering eBooks

The Public Library Funding and Technology Access Study from ALA’s Office for Research and Statistics just released their 2009-10 statistics.  Included in this report was  U.S. public libraries providing access to ebooks – which was 65.9%

A sampling of the % of Libraries Providing E-Books In:

  • Florida–86.9%
  • Hawaii–100%
  • Illinois–46%
  • New York–71%
  • Ohio–83%
  • Oregon–70.8%
  • Washington–48.6

Note: Since e-books are listed in the Internet category we’re assuming these are books downloaded off the Internet from services like OverDrive, Safari, NetLibrary, Books 24×7, ebrary, and others. We’re trying to find out how these numbers and ones to come will count books downloaded once to a Kindle, iPad, nook, or other device and then loaned to many users.

Thanks to Resource Shelf for this information.

The A to Z of Electronic Reference Product Development – ALA session summary

RUSA (Reference & User Services Division of ALA) sponsored a panel discussion of the product development of electronic reference products.  It was organized by RUSA, with Joseph Yue of the University of California at the lead and moderated by  Kay Cassell from Rutgers SLIS.  The panel included Frank Menchaca from Gale/Cengage, Rolf Janke from SAGE Reference,  Kevin Ohe from ABC-CLIO, and Mike Hermann from Greenwood.

Panelists discussed a variety of topics including: how product topics are selected and the role of librarians in that selection, technology expenses, time needed for product development, how items are priced, and the use of online products.  The comments of all 4 panelists are summarized below, by topic. Continue reading