Tag Archives: Amazon Kindle

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues — Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

ALA TechSource has just opened registration for the upcoming webinar series on e-books and e-readers.  I hope you can join us.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library
with Sue Polanka

Two 90-minute sessions
Thursdays 8/4/11 and 8/11/11
2:30 – 4:00 PM EDT | 1:30 – 3:00 PM CDT
12:30 – 2:00 PM MDT | 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM PDT

With the exploding popularity of e-books and e-reading devices, librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate them into their services and collections. Sue Polanka is back by popular demand to present this two-session ALA TechSource workshop on how to go about it. With her practical guidance you will learn how to begin purchasing and lending e-books for your library, and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

3M announces Cloud Library e-book lending service for ’21st century’ libraries — Engadget

Mobile Reading REALLY Comes of Age — An Information-packed Slide Deck Worth Viewing « The Scholarly Kitchen

How To Download eBooks From Your Local Library – eBookNewser

8,000 authors choose Open Access and see direct evidence of the positive impact

Jailbreak Your Kindle for Dead Simple Screensaver Customization – How-To Geek

Cheap isn’t Always the Best Price – eBookNewser

eBooks: Smithsonian Libraries Converts Digital Publications for eReaders; Material is Free To Download « INFOdocket

News: A Hole Lot of Books – Inside Higher Ed

iPad, Tablet Users Prefer Digital Texts — Campus Technology

6 Companies Aiming to Digitize the Textbook Industry

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

Articles of Interest – Kindle edition

A summary of the various articles about Amazon’s announcement to work with libraries via OverDrive, plus a couple of others on Amazon.

Kindle Library Lending and OverDrive – What it means for libraries and schools – OverDrive blog post

Amazon to Allow Library Lending of Kindle Books (Updated) Library Journal

Librarian’s Hope for a “Seamless Experience” with Amazon Kindle – Library Journal

Amazon Continues to Push Book innovation with Library Lending and Ad-Supported Kindles – Scholarly Kitchen

After Kindle Lending, the Deluge « LJ Insider

Amazon to launch library lending for Kindle books – USATODAY.com

Kindle Library Lending Announcement Raises Questions – Information Today

Library eBooks Coming to the Kindle – eBookNewser

Amazon To Bring Ebook Lending to Local Libraries – Mashable

Kinboox – New eBook Lending Site Launched – eBookNewser

SEC is Investigating Amazon About the Sales Tax Disputes – eBookNewser

Achtung! German Kindle Store Opens – eBookNewser

Flat World Knowledge releases Make It Your Own platform

Reprinted in full from Information Today NewsBreaks, by Paula Hane.

Flat World Knowledge, a publisher of free and open college textbooks for students, announced the release of a new platform called MIYO (Make It Your Own). The fully-automated system gives professors greater control over textbook content, and the ability, with one click, to make their modified book available to students free online or in multiple, low-cost digital and print formats.

MIYO (mee-oh) transforms a static textbook into an adaptable learning platform by combining a digital-first architecture with Flat World’s open licensing model that grants faculty the right to revise, remix and share its textbooks. The new system uses familiar drag-and-drop and click features that allow instructors to easily move or delete chapters and sections; upload Word and PDF documents; add notes and exercises; insert video and hyperlinks; edit sentences; and incorporate other content that is free to reuse under a Creative Commons open license. Continue reading

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading

No Way! Kindle owners CAN borrow books from public libraries

I never thought I’d see the day!  Great news Amazon and OverDrive. News release from Kindle here.

From a Publishers Weekly article:  Amazon announced this morning that Kindle owners will soon be able to borrow books from public libraries. Working with vendor OverDrive, which manages e-book lending for the vast majority of public libraries, the deal will make thousands of titles available via more than 11,000 of OverDrive’s public library partners. To date, Kindle has been noticeably absent from library lending, as OverDrive’s service worked only with ePub-enabled devices, including the Sony Reader, the Nook, iPads, and smartphones. Amazon officials said that with Kindle Library Lending, library-ebooks managed by OverDrive will now be available for all generations of Kindle devices and for use with free Kindle reading apps on most other devices, including Android, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone.

The service will launch later this year.

Argentine Library Association Conference -eBook Highlights

Today I presented at the Argentine Library Association Conference about ebooks in US Libraries, thanks to an invitation from the American Embassy (in Buenos Aires) Information Resource Center.  I offered information about purchasing and accessing eBooks and about lending eReaders in libraries.  But, I learned quite a bit in return!  For example, no one who attended my presentation (about 80 librarians) offered ebooks in their library.  Also, only 2 of the attendees owned an eReader (one Kindle and one iPad if you are counting).  Why?  There just are not many Spanish language eBooks available for libraries and the format has not become as popular yet.   I expect this will change soon, as more publishers offer eBooks and US publishers move into the South American market. Continue reading