Tag Archives: Charleston Conference

Charleston Conference – Mobile Reference Apps

Casper Grathwohl from Oxford University Press and Kassidy Lackey from Handmark spoke about mobile applications for reference tools.  Casper provided examples of several vendor-based apps like Gale’s AccessMyLibrary, university library mobile apps, and some apps designed for OUP.  OUP has 85 apps, which cover a variety of reference subjects.  These are marketed mostly to the consumer and OUP reports close to 1 million in application revenue, which is only a small part of their complete revenue.  Casper was surprised to see that libraries and publishers are not yet working together on mobile apps but felt that the opportunities are available, particularly in the area of discovery since both parties have a vested interest in seeing use of the content. Continue reading

Charleston Conference, eBook Access Models and Technology

Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Digital Services Librarian at Southern Connecticut State University, spoke about access models for eBooks, specifically with mobile devices and dedicated eReaders. Lisa spoke about barriers to access stating that restrictive DRM, licensing, and incompatible formats are all barriers to accessibility of eBooks.  Additionally, devices all have different loading options. Librarians have to understand DRM, formats, and compatibility between devices in order to assist their patrons.

Lisa suggested we visit the M-Libraries site, where librarians are sharing their knowledge about ebooks and mobile access.  She also recommended a post from Stephen’s Lighthouse where he lists several sites that compare eBook readers. Continue reading

Charleston Conference – Discoverability and Efficiency

Anh Bui, Executive Publication Manager, Books Products, at HighWire Press presented, “discoverability and efficiency: how users get to content they value.”  She quoted Clay Shirky, It’s really not information overload, it’s filter failure (Clay Shirky, 2008).  Ann stated that information filters can be used/activated by users or they can be used/activated by us (librarians/publishers).

An acronym HighWire uses:  SOIR, socialization, openness, integration, repurposing

They’ve discovered your content.  Now What? Continue reading

Charleston Conference – E-Content Integration

Michael Gorrell, Sr. VP and CIO of EBSCO, discussed several challenges that EBSCO (and other publishers/vendors) are experiencing while integrating content. Some of these challenges include:

  • licensing content from a diverse set of sources
  • processing heterogeneous content homogenously
  • searching everything with precision and breadth at the same time
  • displaying different data so that their uniqueness can be evident

EBSCO’s approach to processing content is to start with database design (bibliographic) and determine which fields the data supports, how the end user will search the data, and what transformations are necessary for display and searching.  When possible, they provide editorial expertise by indexing and adding their own metadata, using controlled vocabulary. They also run their own search engine which allows them to take advantage of the unique data in library records and use it to influence the relevancy of results.  When displaying multiple content types they want to make sure to highlight the individual features of each format.   Continue reading

Charleston Conference – E-Content Procurement

Cory Tucker, Head of Collection Development from UNLV and Emilie Delquie, VP of Publishers Communication Group provided an overview of the variety of ways in which electronic content is being procured in libraries.  Cory discussed several current driving factors for procurement including decreasing library budgets, the variety of business models available, and network level access and discovery of content.

Emilie provided several statistical charts to show the shift of ARL expenditures from print to electronic (estimated 80% on electronic by 2020).  She borrowed her slides from James Michalko at OCLC.   Continue reading

Off to Charleston

The XXX Annual Charleston Conference gets underway on Wednesday with a variety of Pre-conferences.  One of which is E-everything, a full day discussion of eBooks, eJournals, multimedia, and how to best acquire, access, and deliver to libraries and end users.  In addition to the pre-conferences, there are no less than 30 sessions about eBooks.  I’ll be blogging from whichever sessions I attend, so come join the conference virtually with me.

And, it’s your last chance to send me any questions for my Ask An Aggregator session and offer input on eBook archiving. Hope to hear from you.

Now, off to find some shrimp and grits in Charleston!

ebrary’s PDA Model is Finally Live

ebrary announced today the launch of the much awaited patron driven acquisition model.  It’s been a couple of years in the making, received considerable testing, and was grown from librarian demand and suggestions.  A brief history:

ALAMW Conference, 2009.  ebrary hosted a session to discuss patron driven acquisitions and many librarians were there to offer suggestions.

January, 2010, the PDA pilot testing is extended while ebrary conducts additional surveys.

October, 2010 – The ebrary PDA model is Live!

The key features of the PDA model, from the ebrary press release include: Continue reading

Archiving eBooks, librarians are you concerned?

What if your eBook aggregator or perhaps the publisher with whom you now own over 5,000 eBook titles went belly up next week?  What if OCLC and EBSCO never purchased NetLibrary, where would your titles have gone?  Perhaps the 100 titles you’ve bought for your personal Kindle are no good when the device disappears due to newer technology. Are you concerned about accessing the eBook content you’ve purchased in perpetuity?  Is the lack of eBook archiving preventing you from purchasing eBooks? Are Portico, LOCKSS, or CLOCKS suitable solutions for archiving eBooks?  I’m looking for your opinions and concerns on eBook archiving for a Charleston Conference presentation on this very topic.  Please leave your comments or send me a direct email at sue.polanka at wright.edu

Thanks!

Charleston Conference Program big on eBooks

The XXX Annual Charleston Conference, held in Charleston, S.C. November 3 – 6th, has just released it’s tentative program.  It’s loaded with discussions, papers, and panel presentations on e-books, patron driven acquisition, digital textbooks, and more.  I’ve listed a few of the sessions below, but for a closer look, check out the full program.  Early bird registration ends October 1st.

Wednesday, Nov. 3rd – Full Day Preconference – E-Everything: Putting It All Together (additional cost to attend)

THURS Lively Lunch 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM  Digital Warfare: Navigating the E-book Minefield Continue reading

Librarian Speaks up about eBooks

James Mouw, assistant director for technical and electronic resources and the electronic resources officer at the University of Chicago Library, was interviewed for an article in the Chronicle this week.  The article, E-Books: What a Librarian Wants, discusses simultaneous release, DRM, perpetual access, and workflow issues.  James will be speaking at the Charleston Conference in November during the E-Everything preconference.  He will be one of the presenters discussing electronic content integration.