Tag Archives: Charleston Conference

Scholarship for Charleston Conference? Write an eBook essay

Swets Charleston Conference Scholarship

Swets North America is pleased to announce it is offering a $1,000 scholarship to attend the 2009 XXIX Annual Charleston Conference, taking place November 4-7, 2009.

Please complete an essay of no more than 1,000 words on the following topic:

“Figuring out the eBooks Equation: Please describe the most important service or solution missing from current eBook models. What are the potential benefits of this solution?” Continue reading

Charleston Conference – eBook preconference program

The Charleston Conference has announced their pre-conference program. There is one on eBooks – Wednesday, November 4th.

eBooks: Not Just Another Binding

Time: 9 am – 4 pm
Cost: $125

Speakers: Keith Powell, Head of Acquisitions, The UC Irvine Libraries ; Lisa Sibert, Electronic Resources Acquisitions Librarian, The UC Irvine Libraries; and Holly Tomren, Electronic Resources and Metadata Cataloger and Interim Head, Monograph Cataloging, The UC Irvine Libraries; Other speakers TBA – but will include representatives from Springer,Ingram Digital, and the Publishers Communication Group. Continue reading

Widgets guide usage of eReference/eBooks

I love widgets.  Last week at the Charleston Conference I was on a panel discussing “bridging the google gap.”  I was to discuss ways libraries were bridging that gap through reference services.  Widgets was one of my answers.

Widgets can be embedded on multiple library web pages, course management systems, facebook, teacher/faculty websites, anywhere really!  Caution, my web designer friends always remind me to have one ONE search box on a page, otherwise it gets confusing.

There are many eBook/eReference vendors who provide widgets.  I’ve got links to some of them below.  If you know of others, send them my way and I’ll post.

Credo Reference – Search the entire Credo collection with their widget.  Some libraries have put the search widget on a reference page, as a starting point.  Now that Credo links to other sources through their “resource links” feature, users can start with traditional reference sources and move to journals or other databases of your choosing.   For a look at this feature, check out the  Watne Memorial Library .  You might also be interested in an informal review of the new Credo interface.

Gale/Cengage – GVRL in particular.    I am fond of this widget because you can establish subject collections of sets of titles.  Once you have the collection established, it can be placed in the widget and only those titles searched.  This is a fab idea for subject guides/pathfinders, or for class assignment links.

Encyclopaedia Britannica – see my recent post on these

Reference Universe – RU searches the indexes, TOC, and list of articles of both print and electronic reference titles.  Using your online catalog, they will connect the user to a reference source.  The widget opens up your entire reference collection.  St. Mary’s College of California has a great example of this widget.  Be sure to click on “reference.”

Charleston Conference Loaded with eBooks

I just returned from The Charleston Conference and was amazed by the sessions and general discussions relating to eBooks.  I tried to get to most of them, but that was impossible due to the amount of sessions.  If you attended or presented one of these sessions, I invite you to post your comments to No Shelf Required.  I know we can all benefit from hearing more about ebooks.

Some highlights for me were Lindsey Schell’s discussion of patron driven purchasing at UT-Austin – a “platform agnostic” library, and the “banana” story told by Jason Price.  I was also humbled by the number of people that attended my session – the debate between patron driven purchasing and traditional collection development.  Thanks to all of you for attending, and for participating.  We used the audience response systems to survey the attendees, so I’ll post those results on NSR.

Charleston Program to feature plenty on eBooks

Anyone interested in eBooks should take a look at the Charleston Conference program, November 5 – 8th.  There are a plethora of sessions including:

Ebook use among a group of large academic libraries
To Supersede or Supplement? Profiling E-book aggregator collections
eBook Intelligence: The 8th Annual Health Sciences Lively Lunch
E-Books – How are they different/how are they the same as online journals?
Expanding the Ebooks Buying Experience: Approval Plans
Patron-driven Purchasing in Ebooks
Top Ten Things to unlearn about eBooks
Integrating Print and Digital Reference Resources
Student’s Perception of E-books: Survey Results and Discussion
electronic books into a UK University Library collection
The E-book Challenge: From Start to Finish, and Beyond
Bouncing, Viewing and Power Browsing: Understanding How Students REALLY Use Your E-books
Identifying and describing e-books: challenges facing publishers, librarians and their partners

I’m very excited to attend many of these sessions, particularly the one on patron driven purchasing – a great new business model offered by some aggregators.  EBL and NetLibrary are the two that come to mind.

Please excuse my personal plug here, but if you have an opinion on patron driven purchasing, stop by the Lively Lunch session Friday at Charleston.  Alice Crosetto (Univ. of Toledo) and I will debate traditional collection development with patron driven purchasing.  We may even have Michelle Harper from NetLibrary with us to describe this biz model better.  Friday – 12:50 – 2:00 “Tossing Traditional Collection Development Practices for Patron Initiated Purchasing:  A Debate.” Embassy Suites


Is anyone using eBooks?

Kari Paulson, President of EBL, offered these statistics at the Charleston Conference last fall. I verified them with her today. The stats are from EBL. Kari collected these anecdotal stats to respond to the common question, is anyone using eBooks?

At EBL, in the month of October, 2007
The average patron spent 32 minutes reading online, per title (does not include browse time)
16% of the sessions lasted over one hour
17.5 pages were accessed per session
50/50 split between downloading the titles and using the online reader

She also looked at the overall usage of library accounts who used EBL in both October 2006, and October 2007. Usage grew 464%. Granted, the libraries added additional titles throughout the year, but the increase in usage is still amazing.

I wonder how many of the pages got printed ;)