Tag Archives: Dan Stasiewski

New interview with OverDrive’s Dan Stasiewski about the WIN Platform

During the ALA Conference I interviewed Dan Stasiewski, Public Relations Manager at OverDrive.  Dan and I discussed the new WIN platform and the enhanced OverDrive Help which will launch in a few months.  Dan provides some details on DRM, formats, patron-driven acquisition, and simultaneous use titles.

For more information, visit Overdrive.com or the Overdrive blog.  You can also Dan at dan@overdrive.com

Dan’s interview along with 40+ others are available on the NSR interviews page.

Forthcoming audio interviews for NSR – OverDrive, Britannica, ebrary

ALA is a great time to connect with librarians and publishers for audio interviews.  Today I met with Dan Stasiewski at OverDrive to discuss the new OverDrive WIN platform features and Rick Lumsden from Encyclopaedia Britannica to discuss the new Britannica eBook platform.  Tomorrow I’ll be with Matt Barnes of ebrary to discuss the new PDA business model and a recent survey ebrary conducted on downloadable ebooks.  I hope to get these posted early next week. Stay tuned.

“26″ not set-in stone, OverDrive challenged on access fees

Two great articles in Library Journal yesterday.  The first article summarized the comments of Josh Marwell, president of sales at Harper Collins regarding the 26 check-out rule.  Marwell sat on a panel as part of “eBooks: Collections at the Crossroads,” a symposium organized by the Connecticut Library Consortium (#clctrendspotting, #clcebooks).

Clip from article:

“Is 26 set in stone? No. It’s our number for now, but we want to hear back. Immediately. Honestly, it doesn’t make sense that one size fits all. We consider it a work in progress. But this is the number that we have now,” he said.

“I invite you to test the water. Use it. Give us feedback. We’re in the water. We want to be here,” he said, noting that the company wants to sell ebooks to libraries and has been doing so for ten years. Marwell pointed out that HarperCollins has been hearing “quietly” from some librarians who are going to see how the new policy works for them.

“We try to be intelligent about our policy,” he said. “And when we landed on 26, the information that we had was that most books don’t circulate 26 times. In terms of the long tail, this particular number probably works for a different part of the collection. We realize it doesn’t work for the best sellers.” Continue reading