Tag Archives: E Ink

TOC Keynote- Kevin Kelly, Wired

What Technology Wants, Kevin’s new book.  He says it’s the last paper book he’ll write because he is learning so much about digital publishing.

Kevin’s keynote discussed “What’s Next” in his view and he offered 6 trends (verbs), screening, interacting, sharing, accessing, flowing, generating.

Screening – screens everywhere, we are moving from people of the book, where author/authority go hand in hand, to people of the screen.  We are surrounded by screens, screens are becoming cheap enough to put anywhere.  This will be the context where we will publish books.  eInk, could it become bound into a flexible book? Screens are the portals into the machine for everything – books, TV, video, radio, web, etc..  One screen for all.  Orality – Literacy – Visuality. Continue reading

blio available for download today – mixed reviews

Below is the press release from K-NFB announcing the official availability of the blio reader for Windows.  There’s been a lot of chatter on twitter today about reviews, download issues, complaints from MAC users, etc.  The CNET coverage of blio is worth a look.  For a more colorful review, try The Digital ReaderKNFB responded the next day – first day jitters.

I had some download issues of my own, the attempted download froze up Firefox two times, so I had to revert to IE, which worked just fine.  I also noticed in the small print on the blio site than an accessible version will be out in October.  So, MAC users and those requiring the accessible version will have to wait for the blio experience. Continue reading

Cengage Learning Textbooks Available on enTourage eDGe Platform

Brought to my attention by @xplanarob.   I first saw the enTourage eDGe at the O’Reilly TOC conference last February.  I was so intrigued with it I put it in my list of top 10 takeaways from the conference.  It appears the appeal is widespread, as enTourage Systems™ and Cengage Learning just announced a partnership to bring e-Textbooks together on the platform.  Some bits and pieces of the press release are below, highlights:  coming this fall, higher education, dual screen, wi-fi enabled, e-reader/tablet/notepad/AV player. Of note, Britannica, Elsevier, Wolters Kluwer, O’Reilly Media, F.A. Davis, and the Univ. of Chicago Press have also partnered with the eDGe. Continue reading

TOC – Online Marketing, What is Working to Move Units

TOC – The real title of this presentation is…. So an Author, a Publisher, and a Reader Walk into a Bar…  Feb. 24

Speakers:  Malle Vallik, eHARLEQUIN, and Bob Carlton, LibreDigital

Bob and Malle discussed online marketing and what is working to move units. They felt this would be a great conversation in a bar, thus the title. Some highlights from the session are below.

  • What influenced your buying behavior? Bowker asks every year in a survey - last year, 30% said they were influenced by online marketing.
  • Hand selling drives unit sales – publishers have known this all along, but now research finally confirms this Continue reading

eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar summary

I attended the eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar today.  My notes (done real time, please excuse typos) are below.

Speakers:  SarahRotman Epps, Forrester Analyst and Michael Smith, IDPF Executive Director Continue reading

Notebooks preferred to Readers for eTextbooks, highlights of the EDUCAUSE webinar on eTextbooks at NWMSU

I sat in on the EDUCAUSE webinar today on the eTextbook pilot project at NW Missouri State University.  Some background:

NWMS University has been purchasing textbooks for their students for the last 100 years!  They also provide notebook PC’s to students for a rather small fee.  Testing the eTextbook plan with the SONY Reader was the logical next step.  The pilot was last Fall.  The campus library is a separate function on campus, they were not involved in this project.  The presenters will be speaking at the EDUCAUSE conference in Denver this fall. Continue reading

E-textbooks not ready for college students yet?

From Teleread   By David Rothman

image 6 Lessons One Campus Learned about E-Textbooks is the headline over Jeffrey R. Young’s article in the Chronicle of Higher Education. But perhaps it should read instead, “E-textbooks not ready for college students yet, at least in many cases.”

Northwestern Missouri State University used the Sony Reader in a pilot study and, according to Young, found that students demanded printed books instead because of navigation problems with E.

Mind you, this wasn’t with the new PRS-700, which lets you use a stylus to move around. So maybe the results would have been different. Continue reading

Read an E-Book Week March 8 – 14

Read An E-Book Week Read an E-Book Week (March 8 – 14) is fast approaching. In preparation for the big event this year we have completely redone our website – http://www.ebookweek.comThis year we welcome several new supporters – Tor.com, Sony, world-renowned author, Warren Adler, and E Ink to name a few.

Mr. Adler has provided an interesting article for our home page and two well-known guest writers are working on articles about the future of e-books for the website.

Help us celebrate Read an E-Book Week. Let us know what your library or organization has planned for the event and we’ll include you on our Partners page. Perhaps it will be a challenge read, or someone will staff a learn-how-to-download-e-books station to help newbie users.

If you would like a banner for your website they are available for downloading at: http://www.ebookweek.com/ebook_banners.html Feel free to resize them to fit your needs.

Rita Toews

Founder – Read an E-Book Week

10 Reasons Not To Write Off Reading From a Screen

Top 10 list in support of ebooks.  From the Writers Handbook Blog.

10 Reasons Not to Write Off Reading From A Screen
Over the past few months there has been much discussion of an impending digital revolution in the way we read books. While much of this is hyperbole there has been incredulity in many quarters that anybody would ever want to read from a screen. We are all attached to books and the idea seems, at first glance, anachronistic. However there are some good reasons why it might not go away as quickly as you’d think.

Here’s why:

1.)    We do it all the time anyway. Whether its emails, blogs, the newspaper or text messages for the bulk of us, most of our reading is already on screen. The New York Times now was 13 million online readers per day against a print readership of 1.1 million.

2.)    Those who read books read the most online. The Guardian reported that “women and pensioners were [the] most active readers” (22/08/08). A recent study showed women, the most enthusiastic readers, dominate social networks; 16% of “silver surfers” spend over 42 hours per week online. Moreover overall internet usage was up 158% in the UK from 2002-2007.

3.)    e-Ink technology removes many of the disadvantages of screens. Using ionized black and white particles it eliminates eye strain and glare, expertly recreating the look and feel of paper and print.

4.)    New devices (using e-Ink) like the Sony Reader and Amazon Kindle are backed by technology giants who know how to make a product work. They come with features like an MP3 player (the Sony) and wireless connectivity (the Kindle). Expect them to only improve in the coming years.

5.)    In Japan mobile phone fiction- keitai novels- have gone from being a niche market to big business, with some novels being downloaded over 200k times a day. It has been reported that half of bestsellers in Japan are now mobile.

6.)    Likewise in China online novels are huge. The most searched for term on Chinese search engine baidu.cn is “novel”. According to Wired 10m “youth” now list reading online as one of their main hobbies.

7.)    The iPhone has changed the parameters again by offering a fantastic reading experience, on a portable easy to use, multi-functioning device. Apps like eReader and Stanza make an already desirable phone a viable ebook reader.

8.)    Paper costs are going through the roof- up 150% this year. With no slowing of the commodity book in site paper and manufacturing costs are likely to increase. Along with the cheapness of delivery the economics of electronic reading start to make sense.

9.)    Government policy is to invest in ereading. Education policy wonks view reading from laptops and PDAs as a handy workaround to encourage book averse but technophile teenagers to read. A school in Birmingham even replaced all textbooks with Palm Pilots.

10.)  The internet offers a whole new way of consuming content. Bundling, chunking, web only content, integrated multimedia elements, exciting new serialisations are only the beginning. This is reading from a screen not as something like lost but as something gained.
No one is saying that we will all run off any read all our books off a screen. Books are here to stay. Reading from one type of screen or another is not about to replace books, rather it is an addition to the varied climate to literature that already exists, a creative challenge, a commercial opportunity and new way for readers to enjoy texts.

Michael Bhaskar is Digital Publishing Executive at Pan Macmillan and blogs at http://thedigitalist.net.