Tag Archives: EBL

Financial Importance of Short-term loaning eBooks, a Case Study

I was given permission from EBL to post this case study on the financial importance of short-term loaning of ebooks.  The study references Grand Valley State University in Michigan.  It’s posted in it’s entirety below.

The Financial Importance of Short-term Loans:  An Example from Grand Valley State University (GVSU) in Michigan

Prepared by David Swords, EBL

Note:  The data for this case study come from Ron Berry of NYU in Abu Dhabi  (ron.berry@nyu.edu) and Doug Way of GVSU in Michigan (wayd@gvsu.edu).   The information is used with their permission. Continue reading

Blackwell Webinars for Librarians

Those of you with Blackwell (or considering Blackwell) may want to sit in on some of their webinars.  They work with ebrary, Myilibrary, and EBL, and offer webinars on connecting your electronic resources to each of these ebook aggregators.  They are offering a webinar this Wednesday on ebrary, details are below.Join Blackwell for a FREE Infotools webinar on August 19th, 11am PDT.If you have ebrary or have an interest in ebrary as your ebook aggregator, join us and see how you can connect all your electronic resources you currently own to ebooks on the ebrary platform. We’ll show you how Infotools can connect your current resources and how Blackwell makes the acquisitions, collection development and discovery of ebooks easier and efficient.If you cannot make the webinar or if you wish to attend another time, contact me to set one up. We also work with Myilibrary and EBL platform as well, feel free to contact me to setup webinars for those as well.Please RSVP to me for login instructions.Erik Christopher, Blackwell Digital Services Sales Manager, Toll Free: 1-800-525-7964Erik.Christopher@Blackwell.com

EBL expands content, offers title alert service

eBook aggregator EBL (Ebook Library) just announced the addition of 10,000 new titles in recent weeks, taking their title count to nearly 130,000.  Due to several enhancements to their production process they are now processing new titles even more quickly than before.  They now offer a New Title Alert service for librarians and end users.  The optional service will notify you via email when titles in your subject area are received.  50 subject areas are currently available and cover the Sciences, Social Sciences, and Humanities.

EBL’s new patron interface ready for testing

From an EBL press release:

ImageEBL’s new patron interface is now ready for it’s final stages of testing. We’ve created a preview account where we encourage customers to login, test the new interface, and email all feedback to support@eblib.com . The interface will be going live December 15th, 2009.

As well as a fresh, clean, brand new look, you’ll notice that the new EBL Patron Interface also has the following new features:

  • * Bookshelf: access current loans, collections, and recently accessed titles from a centralized location.
  • * Collections: add and organise titles in “My Collections”.
  • * Bookmarks: access and export patron ebook notes without having to enter the ebook itself, and bookmark ebooks at page level.
  • * Search Result Filtering: filter down search results at the click of a button, by Publication Date, Publisher, Category or Language.
  • * Metadata Hyperlinking: link to similar titles in the EBL catalog using LCCH, Dewey, LCCN, Author or Category hyperlinking.

As this is a beta testing period, please keep in mind you may notice further enhancements, fixes and tweaks to the interface while testing is in progress. Also, during this testing period, we’ve disabled the “Help/Feedback” function while we finalise functionality and assess just how intuitive the patron experience is. Continue reading

New Audio Interview with Erik Christopher, Blackwell

Spoke with Erik Christopher, Digital Services Sales Manager at Blackwell about their Collection Manager System for eBooks.  Blackwell is partnered with EBL, ebrary, and Ingram Digital.  Erik’s interview is linked from the NSR interviews page, one of many in our series.

For more information on this product, I’ve attached a pdf of Blackwell’s Collection Manager.  The top of the first page is white, so keep scrolling.

Libraries, are you feeling the love?

As was reported earlier, Sony and Overdrive have partnered to promote library e-book collections.  Sony seems to be embracing the library world as its competitive edge.  Why would one want to buy a Kindle and then have to buy content when you can buy a Sony and borrow much content for free?

It’s unlikely that Amazon will be interested in integrating the Kindle with library e-book collections, since the purpose of the Kindle is  to act as a mobile storefront.

It’s been interesting to read blog comments related to the announcement.  There’s a lot of love out there for libraries, and, it seems, a lot of potential customers who are interested in the remote use of library e-collections.

A large part of the integration of Sony and Overdrive is the “Library Finder” feature linked from the Sony Ebook Store.  I’m rather disappointed in the execution of the service.  Instead of being able to search for a title and see which libraries have it, which you can do from the Overdrive site, you first have to search for a local library and then search for a title.

I’m hoping for a Sony integration partner on the academic market side.  There are academic e-book vendors who support the epub format who would be a natural fit for Sony integration.  In the library where I work we’re planning to circulate Sony Readers to support our EBook Library collection.

The Sony press conference was held at New York Public Library.  I’m still trying to figure out if the partnership with NYPL goes beyond the use of the Overdrive collection.  If any NSR readers have some insight please post a comment.

Swetswise Webinar Summary

I attended a Swets webinar about efficiently acquiring R & D eBooks for the library.  I got a quick glance at the Swets interface, due to launch this January.  They will have eBook title metadata and TOC loaded with ISBNs (and ISBN13) from a variety of publishers (no list available just yet).  Search features look simple enough (quick/advanced) as do the ordering features (shopping cart).  Vendors for particular titles and/or collections were listed with a set price for “one-off” purchases (title by title) and collections.  They offered concurrent user purchases (3, 8, 10, etc.) with a set price for each option which is quite nice.   A participant asked about archiving/perpetual access to eBooks she purchases.  Swets answer – publishers decide if books are available as a subscription or perpetual access.  Those that offer perpetual access, the publisher will host the eBooks perpetually. Can you get a copy for yourself or for a 3rd party to host? – that’s up to the publisher.  Doesn’t sound like Swets will be in the archiving business, but then they aren’t hosting the content, the publishers are.  I asked about MARC records, mentioning the lack of quality of freely available MARC records provided with eBook purchases.  Again, that is the publishers, they provide the MARC records from a variety of sources……let’s just hope the publishers follow the existing MARC standards. Continue reading

Blackwell Webinars for Librarians

Those of you with Blackwell Services, or interested in Blackwell Services, may want to consider attending one of their webinars on connecting electronic resources to ebook aggregators like ebrary, EBL, and Myilibrary.  They have a webinar this Wednesday, August 19th to demonstrate the Infotools option in ebrary, at 11:00 PDT.  Please contact Erik Christopher for more information or to set up a webinar on one of the other ebook platforms.  Erik Christopher, Blackwell Digital Services Sales Manager  800-525-7964  erik.christopher@blackwell.com

Is it possible to donate an eBook to the library?

Roger Sperberg wrote an interesting piece, “How to give away an ebook after you’ve read it” in the Teleread blog.  He discusses the idea of patrons purchasing an ebook to read for themselves and donating it to the library when they are finished.  Roger states, “If I buy an ebook of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, then it’s glued to me. Love it or hate it, I can’t give it to the library for others to read. So why doesn’t the library set up a program for donors: “Buy it in our name and we’ll lend it to you first.” Continue reading