Tag Archives: Go To Hellman

Ungluing eBooks – creative commons licensed eBooks

Eric Hellman has a new blog post on his Go To Hellman site with updates on his new project to support open access eBooks– Unglue.it (or unglueit.com).

From the post: For readers new to this blog, “ungluing ebooks” is what I’m calling the process of raising money to make creative-commons licensed ebook editions of the books that you love, so that everyone, everywhere can read them. You betcha…We’re developing the Unglue.it website on the Amazon cloud; in addition to the four full time Gluejar staff, we have three design and development contractors working on its construction. It’s a great team, but we’re still figuring out how to make our virtual office work. Even when Irene knocks out our power.  Our prototype is using the PayPal payment processing infrastructure, various bibliographic web services, and the Django web application framework. Right now, it looks like we’ll hit alpha in October. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues — Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

From Eric Hellman’s blog, Go To Hellman – The fourth section my book chapter on Open Access eBooks looks at theier relationship with libraries.  I previously posted the IntroductionWhat does Open Access mean for eBooks and Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books. I’ll be posting one more section, a conclusion.

Thank you for all of your comments; the completed chapter (and OA eBook) will be better for them.

Libraries and Open Access E-Books
One of the missions of libraries is to provide access to all sorts of information, including e-books. If an e-book is already open access, what role is left for libraries play?

Here’s a thought-experiment for libraries: imagine that the library’s entire collection is digital. Should it include Shakespeare? Should it include Moby Dick? These are available as public domain works from Project Gutenberg; providing these editions in a library collection might seem to be superfluous. Many librarians have been trying to convince their patrons that “free stuff on the Internet” is often inferior to the quality information available through libraries. There are certainly e-book editions of these works available for purchase with better illustrations, better editing, annotations, etc. Should libraries try to steer patrons to these resources instead of using the free stuff? Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

Articles of Interest: Harper Collins Edition 2

For the week of March 11th:

Articles of Interest

McGraw-Hill’s iPad-enhanced ebooks by Inkling

Could the Kindle be free by the end of the year?

Barnes & Noble claims 25% of US e-book market share

David Rothman promotes the National Digital Library on the Chronicle of Higher Education

Go To Hellman: HarperCollins and the Suspension of eBook …

Podcast: The Future of the Textbook, as Seen by Publishers

How to turn the Nook Color into a fully-functional Android tablet

Can You Actually “Sell” an E-Book? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Shh! eBooks and the Quiet Conspiracy against Public Libraries

Exclusive: Kno Student Tablet Start-Up in Talks to Sell Off Tablet Part of Its Business

Why ProQuest Bought ebrary – Eric Hellman

Eric Hellman has a really nice article describing why ProQuest bought ebrary.  It’s available on his blog, Go To Hellman, but here is an excerpt:

“Take a look at the New York Times homepage. Then take a look at CNN.com or MSNBC. How do you tell which website belongs to a newspaper and which ones belong to a television network? All of them have video. All of them have text. All of them have blogs and forums. As media moves onto the internet, the boundaries between old media genres begin to blur, and new forms emerge, optimized for the purposes they’re being used for.

Just as delivery of news is being transformed by the Internet, the needs of students, researchers, and scholars are driving a similar boundary-blurring transformation in libraries. It’s also driving a transformation in the companies that serve the library industry.

Marty Kahn, President of ProQuest, used the Times-CNN analogy to explain to me why his company had acquired ebrary, a leader in providing ebooks to academic, corporate, and other libraries. It no longer makes sense for a company to specialize in only journal articles, databases, or eBooks if it wants to be able to provide coherent and evolving solutions.”

Articles of Interest

Top 10 Articles of 2010 – Digital Book World

Amazon Kindle E-Reader Sales Will Keep Growing in 2011: 10 Reasons Why – Mobile and Wireless – News & Reviews – eWeek.com

Predictions for 2011 from Smashwords Founder – GalleyCat

How to add books to the iPad, iPhone, etc.

Check Out Library Books Using Your Phone – eBookNewser

David Thornburg on Open-Source Textbooks | Edutopia

Almost One-Third of Internet Users Plan to Buy a Kindle

Feeding Your E-book Habit: Borrowing From the Library — The …

Year One: The Born Digital Publisher – The Scholarly Kitchen

Go To Hellman: 2010 Summary: Libraries are Still Screwed

How to find free Kindle books

NOOK ereaders become biggest seller in B&N’s history

People will pay for digital content says Pew Internet & American Life Project

IDATE releases ebook report

Prediction for 2011 – The Individual Rules – The Scholarly Kitchen

Steve Haber: The Changing Role of Libraries in the Digital Age

Macmillan CEO open to new business models with libraries

Eric Hellman, moderator of the Go To Hellman blog, attended the Publishing Point Meetup Group in NYC and posted a summary of comments from Macmillan CEO, John Sargent.  Sargent stated he is open to new business models with libraries going so far as to say, “If there is a model where the publisher gets a piece of the action every time the book is borrowed, that’s an interesting model.” Hellman recommends that, “Now is the time for publishers and libraries to sit down together and develop new models for working together in the ebook economy. Executives like John Sargent are not afraid of change, but they need to better understand the ways that they can benefit from working with libraries on ebook business models. Libraries need to recognize the need for change and work with publishers to build mutually beneficial business models that don’t pretend that ebooks are the same as print.”