Tag Archives: Google Books

New articles of interest

Time and Tools Are Ripe for On-Demand Acquisitions, Say Charleston Speakers – 11/12/2009 – Library Journal

Revised Google Book Settlement presented to the Court: Limited to U.S., Canada, Australia, U.K.

The End of Single-Purpose Devices

Barnes & Noble Nook Pre-Orders Exceed Expectations

Study: In Downturn, Academic Libraries To Focus on Value, ROI – 11/5/2009 – Library Journal


New articles of interest

David Rothman: How e-Books Could Smarten Up Kids and Stretch Library Dollars: A National Plan

Two-faced gadget is e-reader plus netbook

BookServer: A Plan to Build an Open Web of Books

Google Editions Embraces Universal E-book Format

Report on Nook news conference: B&N switching to ePub—plus other news conf tidbits

College students resisting Kindle DX, says AP—but someone thinks it makes a cool teleprompter

Institutional Subscriptions to Google Books with Advertising? Google Won’t Rule It Out – 10/12/2009 – Library Journal

HP, UMich deal means a “real future for scanned books

New articles of interest

Institutional Subscriptions to Google Books with Advertising? Google Won’t Rule It Out – 10/12/2009 – Library Journal

NY Times – Does the brain like e-books?

Why e-books are getting hotter and hotter

Ebook Accessibility Issues Trouble OverDrive and Adobe – 10/14/2009 – Library Journal

E helping to reduce book-sales decline

US Library of Congress’ Digital Collection Among World’s Largest

New articles of interest

Articles I’ve bookmarked this week include:

College Bookstores Hope to Turn Their Web Sites Into E-Book Portals

In Defense Of Google Books – Forbes.com

DRM viewpoints: Michael Gartenberg vs. Michael Masnick

On the ropes? Robert Darnton’s Case for Books – 9/14/2009 – Publishers Weekly

Google Signs Print-on-Demand Deal for Two Million Public Domain Titles – 9/17/2009 – Library Journal

DOJ Response to the Google Book Settlement

Lots of news and blog sites are reporting on the Dept. of Justice response to the Google Book Settlement.

Teleread has a simple summary, referring folks to the 32 page DOJ official response, Resource Shelf summarizes a variety of news sources, and for a simple overview, see the DOJ Press Release.   The DOJ suggests the parties involved consider several changes to the agreement including:

  • imposing limitations on the most open-ended provisions for future licensing,
  • eliminating potential conflicts among class members,
  • providing additional protections for unknown rights holders,
  • addressing the concerns of foreign authors and publishers,
  • eliminating the joint-pricing mechanisms among publishers and authors, and,
  • whatever the settlement’s ultimate scope, providing some mechanism by which Google’s competitors can gain comparable access.

Interview with Sue in Against the Grain

I just got my hands on the April 2009 issue of Against the Grain, and lo and behold an interview with NSR’s Sue Polanka.  The interview was done by Dennis Brunning from Arizona State University in his cheeky style and is followed by his humorous interview with Kindles 1 and 2.  The article is not available online, so here are some highlights. Continue reading

Upcoming workshop in Philly…. Google, Libraries, Publishing

NFAIS and Drexel’s iSchool are co-sponsoring a workshop on June 26th in Philly titled “Google, the Web and the Future Roles of Publishers and Librarians.”

More info can be found on the NFAIS site.  I’m certain eBooks will come up somewhere in this program. Continue reading

Sony Adds Half a Million Public Domain Google Books to Reader

From the wired.com blog
Sony Adds Half a Million Public Domain Google Books to Reader

By Charlie Sorrel EmailMarch 19, 2009 | 5:36:39 AMCategories: Books

Sony has inked (e-inked?) a deal with Google to bring half a million public domain books to its Reader e-book device, but surprise! Being a Sony service it looks to be awkward to use and no better than just grabbing the texts from Project Gutenberg.

Google has been scanning and textifying public domain texts in its attempt to organize the world’s information, and now they’ll be available for Sony’s e-book reader. This initiative, while certainly laudable as a way to get free books properly formatted for the device, really shows up the Sony Reader and its lack of a wireless internet connection.

First, you need to go to the Sony eBook Store and grab the PC software. Then you can search from the comfort of your own computer the half million books Sony has grabbed from Google. Then you need to sideload the content onto your Reader.

Worse, try going to the eBook site to find the Google link. You’ll have to scroll around. Sony’s web designers have decided to make the word “Google” appear only in jpeg form, so no quick page-search to find it.

Oh, Sony. It’s a nice try, but we think you already lost this one. The Kindle is currently the iPod of e-book readers, and while it doesn’t do everything, what it does do it does right. Plus, you can download any of Project Gutenberg’s free books, or even Google’s, directly, even on the beach. If you really want to read  Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”, that is.

Product page [Sony]

Press release[PR Newswire via Reuters]