Tag Archives: Google Editions

Google Editions Set to Launch

An article in the Wall Street Journal today discusses the long-awaited Google Editions launch, which is set for the end of this year.

According tot he article, “Google Editions hopes to upend the existing e-book market by offering an open, “read anywhere” model that is different from many competitors. Users will be able to buy books directly from Google or from multiple online retailers—including independent bookstores—and add them to an online library tied to a Google account. They will be able to access their Google accounts on most devices with a Web browser, including personal computers, smartphones and tablets.”

Read more: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704369304575632602305759466.html#ixzz16sUJK4ra

Articles of Interest

I missed this last Friday, sorry for the long list.

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

UK Publishers Association sets out restrictions on ebook lending – stupid!

Specter of e-book piracy looms large on horizon

If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of Us | Digital Book World

How five e-readers stacked up – USA Today

In Digital Age, Students Still Cling to Paper Textbooks

The Thinking LMS (Learning Management System) – Inside Higher Ed

Kindles at high school bring praise, surprises – one month of use at Clearwater High School

6 things I would do today if I were a bookstore owner waiting for Google Editions

Honey, I Shrunk the E-Book: Amazon Slicing “Singles” for Kindle

Libertary: new book reading site

Amazon has 76% of e-book market, survey reports

Kindles, Sony & Nook e-Readers Allowing Libraries To Thrive In Information Age?

CUNY to launch Entourage Edge pilot program

As Textbooks Go Digital, Will Professors Build Their Own Books? – Technology

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Google Exec to Speak at Free Virtual Publishing Business Conference

Reprinted in full from Teleread. Thanks, Paul.

Mark Nelson, Strategic Partner Manager & International Lead at Google, will be interviewed during a special keynote event, LIVE during the Publishing Business VIRTUAL Conference & Expo (produced by Book Business and Publishing Executive magazines), Sept. 16 at 10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. ET.

Register for Free

The interview will focus on “Google Editions,” Google’s forthcoming new service that will allow users to buy digital copies of books they discover through Google’s book search, and enable book retailers to sell Google Editions through their own sites and share in the revenue from e-book sales. The foundation and distinction of Google Editions versus other online e-bookstores is its “cloud-based” platform, which provides consumers who purchase books with an “electronic bookshelf,” so they can access their books anytime, anywhere, from a variety of electronic devices, via the Internet.

Nelson also will share his perspectives on the future of the book industry, among other important issues surrounding a shifting industry in which Google has been a dominant player.

To reserve your front-row seat (@ your desk), sign up today
Date … Thursday, September 16, 2010
Time … 10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. (Also available later on-demand)
Where … Your Computer – It’s Virtual
Cost … $0 – It’s Free

Three New eBook Platforms Nearing their Debut

Great post in the Idea Logical Blog about 3 new eBook platforms – Google Editions, blio, and Copia.  The author, Mike Shatzkin, discusses each of the readers angles, pricing, content, and challenges.  Shatzkin’s final take, “So I think we can expect a multi-player ebook market, with some incompatible formats and a lot of incompatible DRM for some years to come. And the players currently in the game can expect their sales to go up but their market share to go down when the three new entrants join the fray this fall. That much seems certain, but very little else does.”

hat tip to @buffyjhamilton for the tweet

New Articles of Interest

Here’s what I’ve been reading (and listening to) this week:

In E-Publishing Revolution, Rights Battle Wears On : NPR

How to self-publish an e-book – CNET News

How will ebookstores earn your loyalty?

New gov’t rules allow unapproved iPhone apps

LibriVox – free audiobooks in the public domain

Upstart E-readers Fade to Black as Tablets Gain Momentum

Cheapie Android tablets: Are libraries planning ahead for them?

Amazon: Kindle Books Now Outselling Hardcovers

30 Million People In U.S. Will Own eReaders By 2015

What Is Google Editions? – Culture – The Atlantic

Publishing & Self-Publishing: Where Is the Tipping Point?

Google Editions: What We Know (and Don’t Know)

Eric Freese, and Aptara Solutions Architect, wrote an article for the Digital Book World blog yesterday, “Google Editions:  what we know and don’t know.”  In this article he discusses content, platforms, partners, EPUB, price, and the possibility of a “gpad” type tablet in the future.  Unfortunately, as the title suggests, there is much we don’t know about Google Editions, but the article is still a great summary.

Print on Demand and Open Access, A Booby Trap?

Interesting article in SSP”s Scholarly Kitchen by Joseph Espisito, “The POD Booby Trap and the Lure of Open Access Books.”  Espisito discusses “the booby trap” of open access, stating, “The unfortunate, unstated premise of those who fall into the POD booby trap is that they really don’t and can’t believe in the emerging primacy of digital text.  The trap is set for anyone who thinks that print is superior for enough readers to make print a long-term viable option.  This is highly doubtful.  E-books have already reached the tipping point.  In just a couple months, Apple has sold millions  of e-books from its online bookstore, millions that come on top of the tens of millions sold by Amazon for its Kindle and Stanza brands.  And Google Editions haven’t even launched yet.  No more make-believe.  If we want the cultural advantages of broad dissemination of scholarly texts through open access, then let’s step up and pay for it.  Authors, department heads, university provosts, granting agencies — all of these have a stake, or claim to, in the distribution of academic material.  Let the stakeholders fund the stake.”

Let the stakeholders fund the stake.  This sounds exactly like a plan that Frances Pinter from Bloomsbury Academic is trying to promote.  She spoke about it at the O’Reilly TOC conference and I had a follow up interview with her in March.  She’ll be keynoting on this exact topic at The Charleston Conference in November.

New articles of interest

David Rothman: How e-Books Could Smarten Up Kids and Stretch Library Dollars: A National Plan

Two-faced gadget is e-reader plus netbook

BookServer: A Plan to Build an Open Web of Books

Google Editions Embraces Universal E-book Format

Report on Nook news conference: B&N switching to ePub—plus other news conf tidbits

College students resisting Kindle DX, says AP—but someone thinks it makes a cool teleprompter

Institutional Subscriptions to Google Books with Advertising? Google Won’t Rule It Out – 10/12/2009 – Library Journal

HP, UMich deal means a “real future for scanned books