Tag Archives: Google

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

eBook Tops All Trade Publishing Categories in February – eBookNewser

World Book Mobile Launched

Libraries and E-Content: Toward a More Universal Design

Copyright Office submission to Congress: analysis of digitization and legal framework of the Google case

David Rothman speculates On A Two Part National Digital Library

More Graphic Textbooks from Flat World Knowledge

The End of Content Ownership | Lance Ulanoff | PCMag.com

Could you create an open textbook?

Inkling: Changing the Textbook Industry — with the iPad – Tom …

Articles of Interest

Forget Netflix. E-book Publishers Need a Hulu: Tech News and …

Streaming or Buying Books: Will Readers Choose a Subscription Model for E-Books?

O’Reilly to Go Print on Demand – eBookNewser

We can surmise that e-book sales may be responsible for the steep downturns in the US and UK – Futurebook

Intel Capital, Condé Nast Owner Invest $30 Million in Kno; Intel to Consult on Student Tablet Hardware

At #LBF11: 24symbols – the Spotify Model for Books

24Symbols to launch ebook subscription service in June

Spanish Start-Up To Launch “Spotify For Books”

Kno secures $30 million in funding, leaves hardware business

Books | Libraries, publishers armed for e-book showdown | Seattle Times Newspaper

Might e-readers replace vanishing libraries?

Google Who? – Inside Higher Ed

Booked! Libraries, eBooks and Their Collections!

Internet Archive Library Partnership Develops Joint eBook Collection To Extend Traditional In-Library Lending Model

The Internet Archive and 150 partnering libraries announced the launch of a traditional in-library lending model for a pooled collection of over 80,000 eBooks.  Yesterday the pooled collection was released to the public — providing access through web browser and download technology. The full press release is available at the Internet Archive, clips from the post are below.

The new cooperative is hosted on OpenLibrary.org, a site where it’s already possible to read over 1 million eBooks without restriction. During a library visit, patrons with an OpenLibrary.org account can borrow any of these lendable eBooks using laptops, reading devices or library computers.

How it Works
Any OpenLibrary.org account holder can borrow up to 5 eBooks at a time, for up to 2 weeks. Books can only be borrowed by one person at a time. People can choose to borrow either an in-browser version (viewed using the Internet Archive’s BookReader web application), or a PDF or ePub version, managed by the free Adobe Digital Editions software. This new technology follows the lead of the Google eBookstore, which sells books from many publishers to be read using Google’s books-in-browsers technology. Readers can use laptops, library computers and tablet devices including the iPad. Continue reading

Against the Grain Announces “MultiGrain,” conversations linking librarians, publishers, vendors, and others

Against the Grain, the premier journal dedicated to linking librarians, publishers, and vendors, is excited to announce new content on their ATG NewsChannel Website.

MultiGrain: Conversations Linking Librarians, Publishers, Vendors and Others, will feature ongoing discussions with a forum for conversations and debates online about the issues that impact us all day-to-day.  The first topic was “PDA and Stewardship: Are They Compatible?” with Rick Anderson (University of Utah) and Brian Schottlaender (University of California San Diego).  Continue reading

TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Summary of Tools of Change session, reprinted in full from Teleread.com by Paul Biba

Bill Godfrey (Elsevier), Rich Rothstein (HarperCollins Publishers), Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly Media, Inc.)Moderated by: Abe Murray (Google, Inc. )

Savikas: first foray in 1987. Stared with cd books and online books in 2001, which was first substantial digital presence. Wish is that Amazon would adopt epub as their standard. Digital is now about a decade for O’Reilly, and one of the biggest changes is that there are many more markets for digital products. Can’t imaging what it will be like in 10 years. Book will not go away – neither the package nor the long form narrative type of content. There will be a whole new category of new media that probably can’t be called books any more. Over the last 100 years more and more layers built up between publishers and consumers and web is bringing us back to a more direct relationship. In his experience the interest in enhanced ebooks seems to come from the publishers more than it does from the reader. Now that books can know that they are being read this can lead to enhanced opportunities. Databases are prime examples for turning into enhanced books. Not convinced that advertising will be as much of the future of newspapers and magazines it has been in the passed. Newspapers have lost the monopoly of being a source of local information. There is what value and need for what newspapers provide, but the package is obsolete. Publishers should be taking a stronger role in advocating with the retailers and device makers. Big piece of the epub 3 revision is to support dynamic delivery to different devices. Continue reading

Opening the eBook Market

Reprinted in full from One Librarian’s Perspective, by Tim Kambitsch, Director of the Dayton Metro Library.

It is fashionable to declared Digital Rights Management (DRM) dead. And maybe in the world of music it is. For eBooks in the library marketplace, however, DRM is alive and well. The book publishers who may be more conservative than the music industry in trying to protect their intellectual property are willing to stymie sales in electronic formats to maximize their sense of security.

In the ideal open-yet-market-driven eBook environment there won’t be DRM, but regardless of whether DRM lives on, the closed vertically integrated world of eBooks sales to libraries presents a bigger problem; it is that environment that needs to change. For libraries to both offer electronic collections and maintain their role of building collections for the long term we need a layered environment where the purchase of materials is separated from the where those purchased materials are hosted. Further, library patrons deserve distinct choices for the programs and devices they use for readings. Continue reading

HathiTrust and OCLC Develop WorldCat Local Prototype

DUBLIN, Ohio, January 18, 2011—OCLC and the HathiTrust have developed a unique WorldCat Local user interface for discovery of items accessible through the HathiTrust Digital Library. The WorldCat Local prototype (http://hathitrust.worldcat.org) for the HathiTrust Digital Library was designed and implemented by both organizations in close cooperation as a means to further develop a shared digital library infrastructure. The WorldCat Local interface for the HathiTrust Digital Library is based on the WorldCat database, and will run along with the current HathiTrust catalog during the prototype testing period. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Ebook sales rise 130% in November

Is the $5.00 eBook the New $9.99 eBook? – eBookNewser

ALA Midwinter 2011: ALCTS Panel Considers the Impact of Patron-Driven Acquisition on Selection and Collections

Google Acquires eBook Technologies | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Kobo adds 175K Education, Technical and Reference PDFs

Bridging the eBook-Library System Divide

Goodbye, DRM? FutureBook blog

Blio Partners with Dell ” PWxyz

Amid E-Book Growth, Students Still Prefer Paper Textbooks

Reader Apps vs. Dedicated Book Apps

Twitter Stats Reveal How the iPad, Kindle, and Nook Stack Up …