Tag Archives: Google

Articles of Interest

Ebook sales rise 130% in November

Is the $5.00 eBook the New $9.99 eBook? – eBookNewser

ALA Midwinter 2011: ALCTS Panel Considers the Impact of Patron-Driven Acquisition on Selection and Collections

Google Acquires eBook Technologies | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Kobo adds 175K Education, Technical and Reference PDFs

Bridging the eBook-Library System Divide

Goodbye, DRM? FutureBook blog

Blio Partners with Dell ” PWxyz

Amid E-Book Growth, Students Still Prefer Paper Textbooks

Reader Apps vs. Dedicated Book Apps

Twitter Stats Reveal How the iPad, Kindle, and Nook Stack Up …

“Books at JSTOR”

Last week I posted a very brief announcement about JSTOR and eBooks.  I’ve since been emailed this more thorough press release.

January 11, 2011 – New York, NY – Five of the nation’s leading university presses – Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale – are at the forefront of a new effort to publish scholarly books online as part of the non-profit service JSTOR.  Their books, representing ground-breaking scholarship across the humanistic, social, and scientific disciplines, are expected to be available in 2012. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Google’s eBook store opens

Google’s eBook Store launched yesterday, with over 3 million books available for download to multiple devices.  Most of these (2.8 million) are in the public domain, and therefore are free, as a result of their massive book scanning project.  The remaining titles will have a “buy” button which takes a user to the eBook store for purchase options.  There are lots of articles written already about Google eBooks, so I won’t duplicate here.  Try a few of these:

Google’s New Bookstore Cracks Open the E-book Market: Tech News “

Hands-On With Google E-Books [SCREENSHOTS]

Google’s Web e-book store ready for chapter 1 – CNET News

Google Editions Set to Launch

An article in the Wall Street Journal today discusses the long-awaited Google Editions launch, which is set for the end of this year.

According tot he article, “Google Editions hopes to upend the existing e-book market by offering an open, “read anywhere” model that is different from many competitors. Users will be able to buy books directly from Google or from multiple online retailers—including independent bookstores—and add them to an online library tied to a Google account. They will be able to access their Google accounts on most devices with a Web browser, including personal computers, smartphones and tablets.”

Read more: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704369304575632602305759466.html#ixzz16sUJK4ra

Charleston Conference – E-Content Integration

Michael Gorrell, Sr. VP and CIO of EBSCO, discussed several challenges that EBSCO (and other publishers/vendors) are experiencing while integrating content. Some of these challenges include:

  • licensing content from a diverse set of sources
  • processing heterogeneous content homogenously
  • searching everything with precision and breadth at the same time
  • displaying different data so that their uniqueness can be evident

EBSCO’s approach to processing content is to start with database design (bibliographic) and determine which fields the data supports, how the end user will search the data, and what transformations are necessary for display and searching.  When possible, they provide editorial expertise by indexing and adding their own metadata, using controlled vocabulary. They also run their own search engine which allows them to take advantage of the unique data in library records and use it to influence the relevancy of results.  When displaying multiple content types they want to make sure to highlight the individual features of each format.   Continue reading

Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Yesterday at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion of the acquisition models of eBooks for academic libraries.  We chatted about business models, workflow issues and their opportunities and challenges, the pros and cons of electronic access,and the future of eBooks.  I was pretty busy doing my moderating duties and didn’t get a chance to summarize the program, but luckily some folks at LJ did.  Here is what they had to say: Continue reading

New Articles of Interest

For your weekend reading pleasure:

ModernBookFactory.com: The First Complete Online Audiobook Production and App Development Service for Independent Publishers and Authors

Ebooks: the future is now – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Imagining the Dream e-Tool for Education and Training – Scholarly Kitchen

And the Best File Format for Open Textbook Publishing Is . . .

Future of the Book | American Libraries Magazine

Gutenberg eReader Brings the Entire eBook Library to Google Android Users

Future-Proofing Your E-Books

CBC News – Technology & Science – E-books: A new chapter begins

TeleRead E-Book Primer Part One: What is an e-book?

A Truly Bookless Library – Inside Higher Ed

IBooks App more popular than Facebook and Twitter

ResourceBlog Article: E-Book Roundup: New and Projected Sales Numbers …

Starting an Open Textbook? Think 100 or 200 Level Courses

eBooks in a Textbook World – American Editor

Lonely Planet’s Augmented Reality

Gutenberg Android eReader app

From PRWeb:  The new Gutenberg eReader Android app, which delivers free ebooks on demand, is now shipping through the Google Android Market. The Gutenberg eReader provides an intuitive interface to browse through the Project Gutenberg catalog and lets users read any ebook on the device.

Reading enthusiasts can catch up on the latest Project Gutenberg releases with the stylish and sleek new user interface. The beautiful icons and large titles allow customers to easily navigate through hundreds of categories, such as Science Fiction, Children’s Literature, Poetry, and Fantasy, etc. The attractive user interface works on any Android phone or tablet devices. A variety of searches–author, title, subject, Google–help the users find exactly what they are looking for. Continue reading