Tag Archives: GVRL

eBooks, DRM, and ILL, a superior blend or a toxic cocktail?

My recent discussion with Cynthia Cleto from Springer got me thinking about some issues.  I’m curious if Springer’s model – no DRM and ILL rights – is unique or if other ebook publishers and aggregators offer similar things.  To me, it’s a superior blend, but I’m thinking that most publishers and aggregators feel it’s a toxic cocktail….

DRM – Digital Rights Management.  Springer uses none.  What about others?  I know the services with one book – one user biz models use DRM to control access and checkout/due dates.  But, there are many other services with unlimited simultaneous user access, full print and cut/paste features.  Are they using DRM?  Ones that come to mind are GVRL, Sage, Oxford, Greenwood, and Credo.

Interlibrary Loan – wow, I’ve never heard of any eBook service offering ILL.  Springer allows full ILL on its content, following normal ILL procedures.  Is anyone else doing this?   Typically, ebooks and ILL don’t mix, which is a major disadvantage of ebooks, probably one that is preventing many from taking the eBook route.   Traditionally, we’ve been able to send most of our purchased items via ILL, but with the advent of licensing agreements and authorized uses, we are losing our ILL rights.  It’s nice to see that Springer is not following that road.

I think I’ll start investigating more about DRM and ILL in the eBook world.  That will give me something else to rant about instead of my usual rant – one single platform!

If you have comments or more information on these issues, I’d love to hear them.

Infobase to release eBook platform this Fall

Attention public, school, and community college libraries.

Infobase, publisher for Chelsea House, Facts on File, Ferguson, and Bloom’s Literary Criticism will release it’s own eBook platform this Fall.  However, titles will still be available from previously established interfaces.

Current titles and backlist titles will be available at launch (1800+) and forthcoming titles will also come in e version.

Looks like the business model is similar to GVRL – unlimited simultaneous access and an archival PDF copy of each title purchased.  Which, leads me to believe this will NOT be a subscription product.  No word yet on pricing.

I’m hoping to get a sneak peek at the interface in the next couple of weeks, so details on the interface bells and whistles to follow.

Gale and Greenwood eBook Partnership Expands

Gale and Greenwood eBook Partnership Expands
Current Greenwood Titles Now on Gale Virtual Reference Library

Farmington Hills, Mich., September 12, 2008 – Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, and Greenwood Publishing Group have enhanced their partnership to include more high-demand Greenwood titles, including more than 130 titles released in 2008 as eBooks on Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL).  Previously, only titles published prior to 2005 were available on GVRL.
“This is a significant benefit to our GVRL customers as it greatly enhances our K-12 eBook collection,” said Erin Sullivan, product manager at Gale. “Greenwood has responded to the requests of their customers to have a larger number of current titles available on GVRL and allow users to cross-reference the most recent titles from Greenwood, Gale and others through GVRL, to provide the most current information available.”
“Customers need to have access to our titles in the platform and format that works best for them,” said Ron Maas, VP Business Development and Sales at Greenwood.  “We’ve been pleased with the response to our initial collection on GVRL, and look forward to expanding our offerings.”
GVRL allows librarians to adapt their reference collection to meet the changing needs of their patrons—offering researchers simultaneous, 24/7 remote access to titles with no special reader or hardware required.
Some of the Greenwood titles now available on GVRL include:
• African American Icons of Sport: Triumph, Courage and Excellence
• Barack Obama: A Biography
• Encyclopedia of Cybercrime
• Global Warming 101
• Going to School in the Middle East and North Africa
• How Your Government Really Works: A Topical Encyclopedia of the Federal Government
• Icons of Crime Fighting: Relentless Pursuers of Justice
• LeBron James: A Biography
• Race Relations in the United States, 1940-1960
• Sports Scandals
• Women Icons of Popular Music: The Rebels, Rockers and Renegades
• Young British Muslim Voices
• And many more
This new content expands the depth and breadth of the reference available through the GVRL, which in addition to several Gale imprints, includes over 2,000 titles from other leading publishers.  For more information, visit www.gale.com/gvrl.

About Greenwood Publishing GroupThe Greenwood Publishing Group is one of the world’s leading publishers of reference titles, academic and general interest books, texts, books for librarians and other professionals, and electronic resources. With over 18,000 titles in print, GPG publishes some 1,000 books each year, many of which are recognized with annual awards from Choice, Library Journal, the American Library Association, and other scholarly and professional organizations.  For more information contact Publicity Director, Laura Mullen, laura.mullen@greenwood.com

About Cengage Learning and Gale
Cengage Learning delivers highly customized learning solutions for colleges, universities, professors, students, libraries, government agencies, corporations and professionals around the world. Gale, part of Cengage Learning, serves the world’s information and education needs through its vast and dynamic content pools, which are used by students and consumers in their libraries, schools and on the Internet. It is best known for the accuracy, breadth and convenience of its data, addressing all types of information needs – from homework help to health questions to business profiles – in a variety of formats – books and eBooks, databases and microfilm.  For more information visit: www.cengage.com or www.gale.com.

Media Contact:
Lindsay Brown
Director, Corporate Communications
Cengage Learning
203-965-8634
lindsay.brown@cengage.com

Interview with Gale/Cengage – Updating eBooks

May 6, 2008

I had a nice conversation with Frank Menchaca, Executive VP and Publisher of Gale/Cengage Learning.  We discussed the importance of updating eBooks and what plans Gale has in place to do this, including Smart Reference and GVRL 2.0 – both forthcoming.

I recommend you download the file first, then listen.

May 2008 – Frank Menchaca, Executive VP/Publisher, Gale/Cengage Learning

Gale’s National Library Week Celebration – Free Access

Cool idea! Thanks Gale/Cengage. I hope this isn’t an April Fool’s joke ;)

To celebrate libraries and their resources, Gale is offering you free access to Books & Authors, our new and innovative online readers’ advisory resource for the entire month of April. Its browesable menus and advanced visual search technology allow readers to discover authors and literature to match their interests. And libraries can customize the interface to promote book club meetings, special events and other happenings at their library. What a great way to build your reading community! It’s free. Try it now and every day in April.

Singing Books & Authors’ praises To celebrate the launch of this momentous new product, we invite you and your patrons to compose a song about your favorite book or author, record a video of its performance and submit it for a chance to win $5,000 — $2,500 for you and $2,500 for your favorite library. Post the contest on your community board to encourage even more entries and have a better chance at winning a share of the prize money! Visit http://www.uptilt.com/c.html?rtr=on&s=4rs,ylw1,2e2o,4jcv,228r,eyl9,9sle for complete rules beginning April 13, 2008.

Enjoy even more access during National Library Week That’s right. During National Library Week – April 13-19 – your library will have free access to all these terrific resources:
Academic OneFile
Biography Resource Center
British Library Newspapers
Gale Directory Library
Gale Virtual Reference Library
General OneFile
Health & Wellness Resource Center
History Resource Center: U.S.
History resource Center: World
Literature Criticism Online
LitFinder
Literature Resource Center
Nursing Resource Center
Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center: Critical Thinking
Popular Magazines
PowerSearch
Science Resource Center
Small Business Resource Center
Sources in U.S. History Online: The American Revolution
Sources in U.S. History Online: The Civil War
Sources in U.S. History Online: Slavery in America Enjoy National Library Week!

Gale Virtual Reference Library

Gale Virtual Reference Library
Review. First published November 1, 2006 (Booklist).

Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL) contains more than 700 reference titles from more than 25 publishers, including Gale, Wiley, Sage, and Cambridge, and focuses on multivolume encyclopedias from a variety of fields. Purchased title by title, GVRL can be customized to fit any library. GVRL runs on the PowerSearch interface, which is clean and structured with many special features. Content is easy to navigate with browse, basic, and advanced searches. Users may select from three basic search options—keyword (default), document title, or full text. Keyword searches the title, introductory text, authors, and first 50 words of an article. GVRL’s advanced search offers several field-search types (document title, image caption, publication title, ISBN, author, start page, document number); limits by date, publication title, subject area, audience type, and documents with images; and search-history access—a feature unique to GVRL. Limits are only available on the advanced search screen. Results are ranked by relevance and may be sorted by document or publication title.
Several features stand out in GVRL. Articles are delivered in html (showing actual page breaks) with links to pdf versions. Users may mark, store, and export items for print, e-mail, or download. Multiple citation formats are included—APA, MLA, and plain text with direct exports to EndNote, Procite, RefWorks, and Reference Manager. Articles can be translated into eight languages (but be careful: translation is not exact but rather employs a gisting software). The InfoMark tool allows the user to obtain persistent links to books or articles with options to bookmark or e-mail. E-books include all front and back matter with hyperlinked tables of content and indexes. The Subcollection Manager Tool allows libraries to create small subject collections within GVRL that can be linked to courses or subjects on the library Web site and searched separately from other GVRL content. Many articles include a find-similar-articles option, which utilizes e-book indexes. Libraries may use the customization options to include messages, logos, and links to library services and to track usage. Users may set preferences of font, colors, language, and number of results per page during their sessions. The cost of individual titles is 10 percent above the print cost. Annual hosting fees range from $50 to $300 depending on the number of titles owned. – Sue Polanka

Sage eReference

REVIEW. First published November 1, 2007 (Booklist).

Sage eReference is a small but growing reference collection. Currently, it contains more than 50 Sage titles (multivolume social-science subject encyclopedias, published since 2002), with 62 on target for year’s end. Among the currently available titles are Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment (2002), Encyclopedia of World Poverty (2006), and Encyclopedia of American Urban History (2007). The collection is designed using the same principles as other e-book interfaces, with browse and keyword search options. Users can browse by title or within 20 subjects, such as African American Studies or Health and Social Welfare. In Advanced Search, searching can be done within a title, across the entire collection to which a library subscribes, or in titles selected by the user. Advanced Search also includes Boolean options and limits to articles with sidebars, images, or tables. Searches can be limited to content types, such as articles, further reading, contributor lists, or introductions, although some content (all front and back matter) is available only in PDF format.
To meet the needs of students, who consistently say “Where am I?” while searching, Sage has designed its interface with several visual cues, including a unique top banner for each reference-book title. This banner, a montage of the book cover design, is present on every page and changes according to the title being viewed. It is visually pleasing, stylish, and useful for reminding users where they are. Each encyclopedia’s home page also includes a summary of the encyclopedia, Browse and Advanced Search tabs for searching within the encyclopedia, and links to front and back matter. Unfortunately, it’s easy to get trapped searching one reference title, since links back to the main search page are unclear.
Another distinctive aspect of Sage eReference is the Reader’s Guide, a feature found in all Sage print encyclopedias and a dynamic navigation tool online. Each guide contains about 15 key themes and offers multiple subtopics, a good way to guide users to topics they may not have thought to search.
Search results are displayed 10 items per page by relevance; the sort order can be changed to title A–Z or Z–A. Articles display with any images and sidebars and links to related entries and further readings. Each title’s index, table of contents, further readings, and see also references are hyperlinked for easy navigation; however, the text within entries is not. Basic printing and e-mailing options are available, but results cannot be stored or exported. The default MLA-style citation format can be changed to APA or Chicago style. Font and word spacing are rather large, and although this means there is less information per page, it is easier to read. There are no options for library customization.
Sage eReference titles are also available in Gale Virtual Reference Library, but those with access via GVRL will need to purchase again with Sage due to licensing and access issues. Why buy again? According to Rolf Janke, vice president and publisher of Sage, “In the future we hope to see a seamless integration of all Sage content (journals, books, reference, handbooks) in one electronic platform.” For a typical academic library with 5,000 FTE, Sage charges 125 percent of the print title, and titles are purchased to own. Access fees are waived for the first 5 years and after that are nominal but based on titles owned. (Last accessed September 6, 2007.) — Sue Polanka