Tag Archives: ICOLC

TOC – Rethinking the Role and Funding of Academic Book Publishing

TOC - Rethinking The Role and Funding of Academic Book Publishing – Frances Pinter (Bloomsbury Academic), Feb. 24

Creating quality content is not without cost.  Frances discussed publishing monographs in academia, which is an endangered species.  print runs for academic books have been on a major decline. She focused on the SS and H (Social Science and Humanities) where the book form is still preferred over journal articles (unlike the sciences).  She offered a very interesting proposition to support an open access model for academic monograph publishing, supported by library budgets.  I hope Frances presents this to library audiences, because it’s worth thinking about and considering.  Libraries want open access, have declining budgets, and like to collaborate.  Her model addresses all of these factors. I’ll try to get her slides or check with her about an audio interview. Continue reading

The 2010 Outlook

What are the challenges and opportunities collection development librarians are faced with during these tight budget times as the nature of collections continue to evolve?  How can academic libraries maintain their purchasing power for collections when severe budget cuts are the norm at many academic institutions?  Can publishers and vendors be more flexible in their pricing models in order to assist libraries sustain purchasing for collections during this difficult budget time?

In January ICOLC warned publishers that academic libraries face impending budget cuts and asked them to develop alternative solutions to the dilemma. In February ARL issued a statement confirming that the situation is dire and must be taken seriously.

Since then it has been reported that several ARL Libraries face serious budget cuts.  Some publishers have responded by freezing prices for 2010.  How is your library coping with budget cuts?

Respond to this post with practical suggestions and solutions about what your library has done, or is planning to do, to weather this recession.  Feel free to communicate with publishers and vendors with price freeze suggestions as well.