Tag Archives: iFactory

Safari Books Acquires PubFactory Interface from RDW Group

Interesting news from Safari Books and RDW Group regarding the acquisition of the PubFactory technology interface.  I have featured the PubFactory interface and it’s development team in previous posts and interviews (Tom Beyer and Marc Segers).  I’m happy to see it is growing.  Here is the official press release on the acquisition by Safari.  Below is a blog post from Andrew Savikas, CEO of Safari Books Online.
Welcoming the PubFactory Team to Safari Books Online

For some time now, we’ve admired the work of PubFactory, a team within RDW Group’s iFactory division that builds powerful systems for delivering mixed content like books, videos, journals, and reference databases through the web for publishers like Oxford University Press, Sage Publications, DeGruyter, Cengage Learning, Harvard University Press and Bloomsbury. Continue reading

Reference Interface Development, an interview with Marc Segers of iFactory

Yesterday I spoke with Marc Segers from iFactory about the trends in online reference platforms and what the future might bring.  Marc offered some great insight, particularly in the areas of content integrations, discoverability, and mobile access.  I hope you will take a listen.  Follow-up questions can be sent to Marc at marcs@ifactory.com.

Marc’s interview and 25+ others are available on the NSR interviews page.

SAGE Research Methods Online – Free access to beta until Jan. 2011

SAGE Research Methods Online (SRMO): the essential tool for researchers has been release in beta.  SRMO provides advanced search and discovery tools to support researchers and students as they explore relevant content across the social and behavioral sciences, covering quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods. It was designed by iFactory.

“SRMO combines world-leading content from a broad range of sources—books, dictionaries, encyclopedias, journals, videos—with a truly unique search and discovery solution which we think is going to offer everyone from new students to advanced researchers a really useful service,” said Martha Sedgwick, Senior Manager, Online Products, SAGE. “We’ve had an incredibly positive response from both librarians and faculty since we opened the Beta version of SRMO, and their feedback during this period will enable us to enhance the platform even further.” Continue reading

PubFactory

During the TOC Conference I got a demo of iFactory’s new platform, PubFactory from Tom Beyer, Director of Publishing at iFactory.

PubFactory is an online publishing platform for publishers or libraries that is xml based, and supports ePub, DocBook, TEI, and NLM Journal formats.  They also support ONIX and RDF for metadata and PDF (metadata and full text searching/viewing).  Continue reading

Oxford University Press chooses PubFactory for Oxford Dictionaries Online

Excited to see that OUP is working with iFactory, and their new platform, PubFactory.  I haven’t seen PubFactory since beta, so I’m anxious to try it out.  Am hoping to get a grand tour via webinar this month, so look for an informal PubFactory review on NSR soon.   Here’s the press release:

iFactory chosen for superior fusion of design and technology,
continues long-standing relationship with OUP

BOSTON – January 14, 2010 — iFactory, an award-winning web design and development firm, today announced that Oxford University Press (OUP) has chosen iFactory’s new online publishing development platform, PubFactory, to develop Oxford Dictionaries Online, a new global modern English dictionary and language reference service. OUP, a major provider of online reference and scholarly content to libraries, turned to iFactory for this project because of its unique focus on design and custom development capabilities.
Continue reading

Interactive Online Reference – Survey Results & Charleston Presentation

Last month I posted a link to a survey about interactive online reference features.  The survey was used to gauge the interest in 30 different interface features, ranging from video and sound to course packs, Web 2.0 features, and sharing materials.  The results of the survey were used during a presentation at the Charleston Conference on November 6, 2009.  The presentation was titled “Interactive Online Reference” and was presented by Tom Beyer from iFactory and myself.  The slides from our presentation are available here, and do include the results of the survey.  Overall, the respondents favored all 30 features, as everything received greater than 50% approval.  But, there were definite favorites, which are listed.  During our presentation, we used audience response systems to tally the interest of the attendees.  The results of those impromptu surveys are also included in the slides.

The January 2010 Booklist will include a summary of the presentation and survey in my Off The Shelf column (which I will post of course), and the full paper will be available in the 29th Annual Charleston Conference Proceedings sometime in 2010.   If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.

Sue

Survey – online reference databases

NSR Readers,
I’m writing to ask for 10 minutes of your time to complete a survey about online reference databases.  I’m trying to gauge interest in a variety of features offered in online reference databases (think GVRL, Credo, SRO, ORO, ABC-CLIO, etc).  My results will be used in a presentation I am co-presenting at the Charleston Conference in a couple of weeks.  I’ll be co-presenting with Tom Beyer, the Director of Publishing at iFactory.  iFactory created Sage Reference Online, a variety of Oxford products, and more.  My part of the presentation takes Tom’s wild ideas and put them into perspective, hopefully using the data collected from this survey to determine if the features could work.

Thanks so much for your time and please feel free to forward this to your colleagues.  Results will be posted on the blog at a later date.
Sue

The survey:  http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=H0KH_2bkK7ZaeY1qWKZvzi8A_3d_3d

New Interview with Tom Beyer, iFactory

iFactory is an web development company in Boston.  They have developed Sage Reference Online, Rosen’s Teen Health & Wellness, and several Oxford University Press products.  NSR got to talk with Tom Beyer, Director of Publishing at iFactory about eBook interfaces and the future of eBooks.  Tom and 15 other interviews are listed on the NSR interviews page.

Reference Publishers Debate Single Platform

On the Friday of the ALAMW Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group met for a panel presentation/discussion on using one single platform to host all reference content.  It was an interesting discussion.  I’ve summarized the panel in my notes below.

Independent Reference Publishers Group Meeting

Friday, January 23, 2009

Representatives from the following organizations were in attendance: Choice, CQ Press, Omnigraphics, Sharpe, ifactory, Sage, Salem, Neal Schumann, ABC-CLIO, Rosen, Credo Reference, Serials Solutions, NISO, Booklist, CHOICE, Wright State University.

The theme of this meeting and panel discussion was instituting a single platform for electronic reference content. Sue Polanka from WSU started things off with her wish list and each publisher had a chance to respond.

Sue Polanka – Wright State University

One day I’d like to purchase/license all of my reference content, regardless of publisher, and load it on the platform of my choice for the best cross searching available. This platform could be an existing one, like GVRL, Credo, ebrary, EBL, NetLibrary, etc. or some shareware, something developed by libraries. Benefits to patrons and librarians include: Greater access, more content, single search interface for ease of use and discoverabilty, easy to implement in library instruction and on web sites. These systems need to have unlimited simultaneous use, 24/7 access, with no DRM or other restrictions on downloading or printing, the most multimedia available during today’s expensive economic times and an actual ebook price, up front, would be appreciated.

Todd Carpenter – NISO

One platform has barriers to interoperability and they are bigger than technological, as in political and economic. [barriers shouldn’t prevent us from trying to do this. IRPG would be a good venue to discuss this. Seems like publishers would want to do this for reasons of – more exposure, and less cost of producing pricey interfaces – has anyone ever heard of epub or the IDPF? SP]

Peter McCracken – Serials Solutions

Federated products are often a starting point for research and therefore have an opportunity to have a reference role. The current design doesn’t work best for the patron since they get mostly articles. Somehow relevance needs to be a factor to assign tags to reference and get them to the top. We need to use field mapping more effectively. [I prefer a pre-indexed approach since federated products tend to be slow. Publishers/aggregators should take advantage of all metadata and tag reference items appropriately. If federated products are used, the reference content should be faceted as “overview material” or “background information.” SP]

Rolf Janke – Sage Reference

Publishers still have an infrastructure that supports print publishing.  The infrastructure is a difficult component to downsize in favor of doing more digital publishing. Print is a one size fits all model yet e publishing is not so, publishers have a multitude of business models, interfaces, features, etc.  The concept of a one size fits all platform for all publishers content is way ahead of its time, publishers currently could never agree on a standard business model. Pricing standards could help, but are not likely. [Gee, these must be the political and economic barriers that Todd was referring to? Looks like publishers could learn about collaboration from libraries. SP]

Ron Boehm – ABC-CLIO

Publishers need to invest in new things while maintaining our print production, which is expensive for publishers, particularly in these bad economic times. Right now we need to do both [e and p] or we would lose half of our business. The best strategy for ebooks is to have unlimited access. Ron supports the idea of publishers working with multiple aggregators or distributors to have reference content available in a multitude of platforms, but doesn’t recommend the libraries/consortia maintain their own platform. [Ditto on unlimited access and multiple aggregators. OhioLINK has been maintaining its own platforms for years. It’s a great system when you want to make enhancements and don’t have to wait on other companies or the majority of users to agree. SP]