Tag Archives: InfoDocket

Articles of Interest – Penguin/OverDrive edition

A flurry of blog posts and news articles are appearing related to the Penguin announcement to suspend library lending of titles. Here are a few articles of interest:

OverDrive Suspends Access to New Penguin eBook Titles, “Get For Kindle” Access Also Shutdown « INFOdocket

Penguin Group USA to No Longer Allow Library Lending of New Ebook Titles — The Digital Shift

This Deal Is Getting Worse All the Time | Library Renewal

Penguin Pulls eBooks From Public Libraries Dropping it Down to 1 of the Big 6 Publishers Playing Nice With Libraries | Librarian by Day

Why Might A Publisher Pull Its E-Books From Libraries? by Laura Hazard Owen « INFOdocket

Why Penguin is worried about the role of Amazon’s Kindle in libraries – CSMonitor.com

Kindle Lending Library launches with 5,000 titles

The rumored news of Kindle offering a lending library has come to fruition.  Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy from INFODocket shared this post this morning and gave me permission to repost in full.  INFODocket posts all type of in-depth industry news and reports, so check them out for more than eBooks. @INFODocket

UPDATE: Paul Biba at TeleRead has posted a breakdown of the titles (by category) currently available from the Kindle Lending Library.

The rumored Kindle eBook lending service is real and is now live. It will  add a new variable as libraries rethink their roles, collection building, eBook services for libraries, and many other issues.

First, some fast facts and links and then a few comments on first learning and digesting the news. As you’ll see there are a number of restrictions and limitations as of today. Of course, if this initial launch is successful, this will very likely change.

Fast Facts (As of Today):

  • The Kindle Lending Library is ONLY Available to Those Who Own a Kindle Device AND Subscribe to the Amazon Prime Service
  • The Service is Only Available for U.S. Customers
  • None of the Six Largest U.S. Publishers are Participating
  • Books Can Be Read on Multiple Kindle Devices, as Long as They’re Registered to the Same Eligible Account
  • Books CANNOT Be Read on Kindle Reading Apps (Android, iOS, PC, Mac, etc.)
  • One Book Can be Borrowed at a Time, and There are No Due Dates
  • You Can Borrow a New Book as Frequently as Once a Month, Directly on a Registered Kindle Device, and You Will Be Prompted to Return the Book That You are Currently Borrowing
  • If You Have Already Borrowed a Book in that Calendar month, You are Not Yet Eligible to Borrow a New Book Until the Next Calendar Month.  There is No “Roll-Over” or Accrual of Unused Borrowing Eligibility
  • Bookmarks, Notes, and Highlights are All Available on Kindle Owners’ Lending Library Titles, and Will be Saved to your Amazon.com Account  If You Borrow Again or Purchase the Book in the Future, Your Notes and Highlights Will be Available for You
  • A Few of Titles Available at Launch Continue reading

OverDrive, Amazon, and Privacy – INFODocket explores the questions

Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy at INFODocket are asking some very important questions about end-user privacy when borrowing OverDrive  library books through a third party vendor site (Amazon). The post asks:

  • Is Amazon collecting download information?
  • Is Amazon saving library download info permanently?
  • If not, how long will they keep it? Is there a retention policy?
  • Can you provide any info about privacy as it relates to OverDrive/Amazon?
  • Will the library books you borrow be used by Amazon to provide recommendations of books for you to purchase?
  • Is there a link to scrub all of your personal “library” data from Amazon.com’s servers with a single click?
  • Do OverDrive and Amazon.com have any suggestions about how to make the entire process clearer to users?
  • How would they respond to the issue that, since the service is being marketed by libraries, users might incorrectly think library privacy policies may still apply?

More information about this issue is available via the INFODocket blog post.

Articles of Interest

3M announces Cloud Library e-book lending service for ’21st century’ libraries — Engadget

Mobile Reading REALLY Comes of Age — An Information-packed Slide Deck Worth Viewing « The Scholarly Kitchen

How To Download eBooks From Your Local Library – eBookNewser

8,000 authors choose Open Access and see direct evidence of the positive impact

Jailbreak Your Kindle for Dead Simple Screensaver Customization – How-To Geek

Cheap isn’t Always the Best Price – eBookNewser

eBooks: Smithsonian Libraries Converts Digital Publications for eReaders; Material is Free To Download « INFOdocket

News: A Hole Lot of Books – Inside Higher Ed

iPad, Tablet Users Prefer Digital Texts — Campus Technology

6 Companies Aiming to Digitize the Textbook Industry

Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session

On Tuesday, May 3rd I recorded a 15 minute segment for the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education on Think TV, the local public television station in Dayton, Ohio.  My topic was the rise of digital textbooks and options available for students and faculty to access and produce textbooks and learning materials.  Below is a snapshot of my general comments with links to various sources for more information.

Our current textbook system is broken.  We have arrived at $200 textbooks and have students who cannot afford them.  As a result, students try to borrow a textbook from the library or a friend (sometimes the older edition), purchase a used one, or go without.  Neither of these options provides revenue to the publisher, thus resulting in higher price points in an effort to recover the costs or production.   What can we do about this catch 22? Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Apologies for the long list, I’ve been away for a week and lots has happened!

Ingram Announces New Library Ebook Access Model and Audiobook Shift

In the era of ebooks, what is a book worth (I)

Is signing with a mainstream publisher now a mistake?

Digital book subscriptions, by Jane Litte

Publishers Weekly: Librarians at the Gate

HathiTrust: A Research Library at Web Scale – from InfoDocket

Reflections on Google Book Search – The Scholarly Kitchen

AcademicPub Opens Custom Textbook-Building to Faculty …

California Bill Would Offer Clear Protection for Digital Reading Records

Six Reasons Google Books Failed by Robert Darnton | NYRBlog | The New York Review of Books

Nook Friends is a Shot Across the Bow of eBook Lending Sites – eBookNewser

Sixty Percent of iPad Owners Read eBooks on Their iPad – eBookNewser

Hands on With Sony’s S1, S2 Tablet PCs

News: No Room for Books – Inside Higher Ed

This Week in Libraries: Interview with Sarah Houghton-Jan about ebooks

OnCampus Research: “E-Books, E-Readers Begin to Catch on with College Crowd”

Google Books Settlement Rejected

The Google Books Settlement was rejected on Tuesday.  There has been a ton of press on this already.  Here are links to several key articles and documents:

PDF of Judge Denny Chin’s decision

The Google books settlement:  Where things stand and some suggestions for what’s next -  via The Scholarly Kitchen

Google Book Settlement Rejected:  Press Review, Comments and Resources – via INFODocket

Statements from the AAP, Open Book Alliance, and National Federation of the Blind – via TeleRead

Please Refine Your Search Terms – Higher Ed News


Articles of Interest – Harper Collins Edition

HarperCollins Puts 26 Loan Cap on Ebook Circulations

Boycott HarperCollins

HCOD, eBook User Bill of Rights and Math

Outrage is Not Adaptive

HarperCollins responds to angered librarians

Roundup: What’s the Mainstream Press Writing About the eBooks – INFODocket

More Libraries and Librarians Weigh In On eBook Lending …INFODocket

Press Coverage of Libraries/Harper Collins, Roundup #3 – INFODocket

The HC boycott: why it should worry publishers more than it is

Well done, HarperCollins: librarians must change old thinking, by Martin Taylor

Librarians apply HarperCollins’ 26-read lending limit to HarperCollins’ own paper books

Resource Shelf Editors Launch InfoDocket and FullTextReports

Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy, formerly the senior editors of Resource Shelf and Docuticker, have now moved on to another complimentary set of news sites – InfoDocket and FullText Reports.  Both of these new sites offer great aggregated content with a new look and feel.

ResourceShelf continues to publish (10+ years) with new editorial staff at http://www.resourceshelf.com/ and is part of the FreePint Family (http://www.freepint.com).