Tag Archives: Internet Archive

New Jersey eBook Summit Summary – part two

Please note that the part two blog post has now been added to the New Jersey eBook Summit Summary.

Today the NJ State Library, LinbraryLinkNJ- The NJ Library Cooperative, NJ Library Association and the NJLA Reference Section sponsored an E-book Summit in Eatontown, New Jersey.  The line-up of speakers included:

  • Eli Neiburger, Ann Arbor District Library
  • Sue Polanka, Wright State University Library & No Shelf Required
  • Robert Miller, Director of Books, Internet Archive
  • Mary Minow, Attorney, Consultant, and Former Librarian
  • Joseph Sanchez, University of Colorado – Denver Continue reading

New Jersey Ebook Summit Summary

Pictured from left to right:  Eli Neiberger, Patricia Tumulty, Mary Minow, Norma Blake, Robert Miller, Sue Polanka, Cheryl O’Connor, Joseph Sanchez, Peggy Cadigan.

Today the NJ State Library, LinbraryLinkNJ- The NJ Library Cooperative, NJ Library Association and the NJLA Reference Section sponsored an E-book Summit in Eatontown, New Jersey.  The line-up of speakers included:

  • Eli Neiburger, Ann Arbor District Library
  • Sue Polanka, Wright State University Library & No Shelf Required
  • Robert Miller, Director of Books, Internet Archive
  • Mary Minow, Attorney, Consultant, and Former Librarian
  • Joseph Sanchez, University of Colorado – Denver Continue reading

World eBook Fair – 6.5 million ebooks available through August 4th

The World eBook Fair runs from July 4 through August 4, 2011. Their goal is to provide Free public access for a month to 6.5 Million eBooks.  Project Gutenberg and the Internet Archive are both contributing organizations and will be presenting a number of items in other media this year, including music, movies and artwork, even dance choreography.  The collections include light and heavy reading materials, more reference books, scientific items, etc., and about 50,000 music entries in addition to the 12,000 that debuted last year.

All are welcome to join the World Public Library as well for an annual membership of $8.95 per year.  Members can download a selection of about 2,000,000 PDF eBooks.

Internet Archive to preserve print

Brewster Kahle posted on the Internet Archive blog this week about plans to preserve print books.  Kahle states, “books are being thrown away, or sometimes packed away, as digitized versions become more available. This is an important time to plan carefully for there is much at stake.”   As a result, they are building a facility to preserve print copies of every book, record, or movie they are able to acquire.  Much more information is in the blog post, including photos of the new facility.

Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

From Eric Hellman’s blog, Go To Hellman – The fourth section my book chapter on Open Access eBooks looks at theier relationship with libraries.  I previously posted the IntroductionWhat does Open Access mean for eBooks and Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books. I’ll be posting one more section, a conclusion.

Thank you for all of your comments; the completed chapter (and OA eBook) will be better for them.

Libraries and Open Access E-Books
One of the missions of libraries is to provide access to all sorts of information, including e-books. If an e-book is already open access, what role is left for libraries play?

Here’s a thought-experiment for libraries: imagine that the library’s entire collection is digital. Should it include Shakespeare? Should it include Moby Dick? These are available as public domain works from Project Gutenberg; providing these editions in a library collection might seem to be superfluous. Many librarians have been trying to convince their patrons that “free stuff on the Internet” is often inferior to the quality information available through libraries. There are certainly e-book editions of these works available for purchase with better illustrations, better editing, annotations, etc. Should libraries try to steer patrons to these resources instead of using the free stuff? Continue reading

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading

Internet Archive’s Brewster Kahle talks about the In-library Lending Program

Last week the Internet Archive announced the launch of a traditional In-Library Lending model for a pooled collection of over 80,000 eBooks.  The program, available on openlibrary.org, provides access to the ebooks through a web browser and download technology.  I had a chance to interview Brewster about the new program in my NSR audio interviews.  The full press release on the In-Library Lending program is available at the Internet Archive.

The interview with Brewster is also available on the NSR interviews page, along with about 35 others.

Internet Archive Library Partnership Develops Joint eBook Collection To Extend Traditional In-Library Lending Model

The Internet Archive and 150 partnering libraries announced the launch of a traditional in-library lending model for a pooled collection of over 80,000 eBooks.  Yesterday the pooled collection was released to the public — providing access through web browser and download technology. The full press release is available at the Internet Archive, clips from the post are below.

The new cooperative is hosted on OpenLibrary.org, a site where it’s already possible to read over 1 million eBooks without restriction. During a library visit, patrons with an OpenLibrary.org account can borrow any of these lendable eBooks using laptops, reading devices or library computers.

How it Works
Any OpenLibrary.org account holder can borrow up to 5 eBooks at a time, for up to 2 weeks. Books can only be borrowed by one person at a time. People can choose to borrow either an in-browser version (viewed using the Internet Archive’s BookReader web application), or a PDF or ePub version, managed by the free Adobe Digital Editions software. This new technology follows the lead of the Google eBookstore, which sells books from many publishers to be read using Google’s books-in-browsers technology. Readers can use laptops, library computers and tablet devices including the iPad. Continue reading

HathiTrust and OCLC Develop WorldCat Local Prototype

DUBLIN, Ohio, January 18, 2011—OCLC and the HathiTrust have developed a unique WorldCat Local user interface for discovery of items accessible through the HathiTrust Digital Library. The WorldCat Local prototype (http://hathitrust.worldcat.org) for the HathiTrust Digital Library was designed and implemented by both organizations in close cooperation as a means to further develop a shared digital library infrastructure. The WorldCat Local interface for the HathiTrust Digital Library is based on the WorldCat database, and will run along with the current HathiTrust catalog during the prototype testing period. Continue reading

ALAMW – ALA Washington Office Program on eBooks

Saturday, January 8th, ALA’s Washington Office is presenting, Turning the Page on E-books, a moderated discussion on the challenges and opportunities for libraries and their patrons from 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. in the Convention Center, Room 02.  Panelists and speakers include:  Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive; Tom Peters, CEO of TAP Information Sources (huge contributor to the COSLA Report); Rich Weingarten, information technology and policy consultant, and Sue Polanka, moderator of No Shelf Required. Come and join the discussion.