Tag Archives: Jason Price

E-Everything: Putting it All Together, A Charleston Preconference

On Wednesday, November 3rd the 30th Annual Charleston Conference will begin with a series of pre-conferences.  One of them is called E-everything: Putting it All Together.  Details of the program and speakers are listed below.  If you are interested in attending, you can register online.

E-Everything: Putting it All Together
Electronic resources continue to flood the library marketplace at a staggering rate and there is no turning back now.  Libraries are making an effort to accommodate the influx of electronic content while budgets and staffing levels continue to diminish. Publishers are undergoing a paradigm shift, trying to maintain traditional publishing models while experimenting with born digital content.

This full day pre-conference will discuss the current state of electronic resources from both the library and publishing perspectives and offer insight into the E-Everything future. Some of the current issues that will be addressed include access, content integration, technology, and discoverability.  Presentations by librarians and vendors will update you, challenge your thinking, stimulate questions and generate discussion.  Attendees will gain knowledge of the market and get ideas for plugging into the latest and the greatest information technologies for electronic content. Continue reading

Another interview on patron driven purchasing with Jason Price & John McDonald

Last Friday I spoke with Jason Price and John McDonald from Claremont Colleges about patron driven purchasing models.  We discussed many of the benefits and barriers to implementing patron driven models and got into detail about a study Jason and John conducted regarding the use of patron selected titles compared to librarian selected titles.  Here are links to the variety of sources that were discussed during the interview:

Price/McDonald Interview

Price/McDonald Paper

Price/McDonald Presentation

For follow-up questions, you can reach Jason and John at:  jason_price@cuc.claremont.edu and john_mcdonald@cuc.claremont.edu

Patron Driven Purchasing, an interview with Michael Levine-Clark

Last week I spoke with Michael Levine-Clark, Collections Librarian from the University of Denver, about patron driven purchasing models and how they are being implemented at his library.  Michael has been researching, testing, and writing about patron driven techniques for quite a while and discusses his experiences with me in the interview. I hope to make this topic, patron driven purchasing, a two-part interview, speaking with Jason Price and John McDonald from Claremont University in early August.

Michael’s interview can be found on the interviews page, along with over 24 other audio interviews with publishers, librarians, and others in the information industry.

Mad World of eBooks part one – ALA discussion

On Saturday morning at ALA, a group of librarians and publishers gathered together to discuss the world of eBooks, particularly aspects of consortial purchasing.  Each hour of the discussion a panel of publishers and librarians was on hand to lead the discussion.

The event was organized by Michael Zeoli at YBP, Julie Gammon at the University of Akron, and Tony Horava at OCUL.  Michael began the event with general slides about eBook and print book availability and sales.  He also offered a few anonymous comments from librarians.  I’ll try to get copies of his slides to post. Continue reading

Patron Driven Purchasing Usage Study – Results Here

Jason Price and John McDonald from the Claremont University Libraries presented “Beguiled by Bananas: a retrospective study of the usage and breadth of patron vs. library acquired ebook collections” at the Charleston Conference this past November.  Some of the main points from the study were:

Are user-selected ebooks used less often than pre-selected ebooks?
No. User-selected ebooks are used ≈2-5x more often
Do user-selected ebooks have a narrower audience?
No. User-selected ebooks are used by ≈2-3x more unique users
Are user-selected collections less balanced by subject?
No.  User selected collections are similarly balanced.

The complete presentation, in pdf is here. If you’d like to see the notes, then click on this one instead.  Jason and John will also discuss their study in the Proceedings of the 29th Annual Charleston Conference.

Can eBooks replace the print collection? A study at Claremont Colleges

Jason Price and John McDonald, from Claremont Colleges, have completed a study profiling various ebook aggregator collections to their print collection.  Their goal, to find out if eBooks can supersede the print collection, or just supplement the collection.  They presented this in Charleston last November, but have now finalized their stats and have posted the presentation and results. The study, To supersede or supplement: profiling aggregator e-book collections vs. our print collections, found that they cannot supersede the print collection with ebooks as 70% of their print collection is not available in ebook format.  So, eBooks will have to supplement the collection.

Jason and John discovered in their research that aggregator title lists are largely unique.  Also, titles in visual arts, painting, and romance literatures had the least amount of eBook content.

For more information, read the report, or contact Jason or John.

Jason.price@libraries.claremont.edu
John.mcdonald@libraries.claremont.edu

Charleston Conference Loaded with eBooks

I just returned from The Charleston Conference and was amazed by the sessions and general discussions relating to eBooks.  I tried to get to most of them, but that was impossible due to the amount of sessions.  If you attended or presented one of these sessions, I invite you to post your comments to No Shelf Required.  I know we can all benefit from hearing more about ebooks.

Some highlights for me were Lindsey Schell’s discussion of patron driven purchasing at UT-Austin – a “platform agnostic” library, and the “banana” story told by Jason Price.  I was also humbled by the number of people that attended my session – the debate between patron driven purchasing and traditional collection development.  Thanks to all of you for attending, and for participating.  We used the audience response systems to survey the attendees, so I’ll post those results on NSR.