Tag Archives: JISC

Liverpool University Press partners with BiblioBoard for eTextbook

BiblioBoard will host the innovative new textbook being created jointly by Liverpool University Press, the University of Liverpool Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and the University Library. This project, funded by Jisc, seeks to address the question: can a university working as an e-textbook creator and publisher better serve students and promote a more sustainable information environment in higher education? Continue reading

Challenge of eBooks workshop in London, participants needed

The following is an announcement from Ken Chad regarding a JISC study:

The challenge of ebooks: Can you contribute? Workshop in London on Tuesday 21st August

We are investigating the challenges of ebooks in academic institutions and would like to engage, early on in our project, with individuals interested in taking part in a workshop in London on Tuesday 21st August. The aims of this half day (free) event are to:

  1. Help identifying/validate the issues of concern. The overriding themes of the project revolve around the ‘creation, curation and consumption’ of ebooks. The project defines ebook very widely and  covers all forms of digital books including epub format, online books, etextbooks, wiki-based books, open textbooks, digital monographs, open educational resources and other forms of campus-based publishing.
  2. Help with the analysis of the ‘jobs’ (in the sense of the ‘jobs-to-be-done’ methodology) that individuals (students, academics, researchers etc) do for which ebooks may be (potentially) the solution.   Continue reading

JISC launches new study on the challenge of ebooks in academic institutions

JISC recently announced a new research study on the challenge of eBooks in academic institutions.  A project wiki has been established by the team, of which I am honored to be a member.  I am posting with permission, the first entry on the site. Please check the wiki for periodic updates.

Today we kick off our ebook project for the JISC: ‘The challenge of ebooks in academic institutions.’ The project will run through August, September and October 2012. The project web site (wiki) has been set up and is organised around the key tasks or strands of the project. It’s only day one of the project so the wiki is sparse.  We have made a start on pulling a few references together with extracts to indicate why we think they are relevant to our project. If you have any suggestions do get in touch. There is also a page on the project team.  Some of our team worked together on a previous project on ebooks – ‘The Role of Metadata in the Discovery, Selection and Acquisition of e-Books’ –in the context of patron (or demand) driven acquisitions (PDA/DDA). Continue reading

JISC Report on PhD Researchers

The BL/JISC 2009-10 annual report on Researchers of Tomorrow: A Three Year BL/JISC study tracking the research behaviours of Gen Y doctoral students was just released in June 2010.  While the report doesn’t mention ebooks per se, it does highlight how library collections and services are used/not used by PhD student in the UK.  Students expressed particular frustration with getting the full text of scholarly journal articles, particularly those they found citations for in google scholar/library citation databases where full-text was not subscribed to by their institutions. Other topics of discussion include: using IT in research, main place of research work, training and support of research, use of ILL services, consultations with subject specialist librarians.  One statistic I found interesting was that 57% of Gen Y students have never used advice from subject specialist librarians.

eBook platform comparison chart

I’m not sure how I didn’t find this earlier, but thanks to a colleague, Erik Christopher, I am now aware of the JISC eBook comparison chart. It is available on the JISC site at http://www.jisc-adat.com/adat/adat_ebooks.pl and offers a comparison of up to 7 different eBook platforms including:  Credo Reference, NetLibrary, ebrary, EBL, MyiLibrary, Dawsonera, and Taylor and Francis eBookstore.  Over 50 functional features are compared with basic Y/N responses including search, access control, search results, linking, restrictions, exporting, etc.  All data is supplied by the vendors.  They are obviously missing some reference eBook databases, so I hope Gale, SAGE, ABC-CLIO, Oxford, Rosen, and others can hop on board this chart.  If anyone is shopping for eBook platforms, or if publishers are considering launching an eBook site, this is a great place to go for ideas and industry standard features.

They also offer a comparison chart for scientific databases.

OCLC/JISC Report on User Behavior Projects

OCLC Research scientists, in partnership with JISC, have analyzed and synthesized 12 separate studies to make it easier for information professionals to better understand information-seeking behaviors of library users and to review the issues associated with the development of information services and systems that will best meet these users’ needs.

The Digital Information Seeker: Report of Findings From Selected OCLC, RIN and JISC User Behaviour Projects, by Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D. and Timothy J. Dickey, Ph.D., OCLC Research, was funded by JISC, and was presented during the JISC Annual Conference in London in April.

The full report can be downloaded in pdf.

eBook Course, University of Newcastle

Getting to grips with developing and managing e-book collections: an introduction

to be held in the

Netskills Training Suite, University of Newcastle
Tuesday 27th October 2009, 9.30 – 16.30

Course Outline
This course opens the door to a new electronic format and is designed to support librarians who are beginning to set up e-book collections. In the last eight years, there has been an unprecedented growth in the publishing of e-books with an increasing array of different types available for all sectors. The programme will give you the opportunity to explore different e-books including a range of commercially-published and free reference works, monographs, textbooks, and fiction. Examples will include individual titles and also collections of e-books, such as those offered by NetLibrary, Credo, MyiLibrary and Oxford University Press. The course will also facilitate consideration of the new opportunities e-books offer for librarians and users in academic, public and special library and information services, and will explore the significant collection management and promotional issues which challenge information and library staff.
The course is designed to offer: *    an understanding of the nature of e-books
*    a familiarity with range of commercially-produced e-books from publishers and aggregators
*    a familiarity with range of free e-books *    an appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages of the medium
*    an appreciation of the collection management issues associated with bibliographical control, selection, acquisition, access, evaluation, licensing, and archiving
*    a familiarity with the different ways of promoting awareness and use of e-books.

In addition to talks by the presenters, the course includes practical exercises. One will allow delegates to explore examples of online e-books in a structured way. Others will comprise activities during which delegates will examine the major collection management, and marketing and promotion issues. Plenary sessions led by the course presenters will be held to enable delegates to  discuss their findings in the light of current research and professional practice.

Course Presenters: Ray Lonsdale and Chris Armstrong
Chris Armstrong and Ray Lonsdale have been working and offering courses in the field of e-books, e-resources and collection management for the past 12 years, both in the UK and abroad. Up until recently, they were members of the Joint Information Systems Committee e-Book Working Group, which has been promoting the publishing and uptake of e-books in further and higher education and sixth form colleges. Ray is Reader in Information Studies at Aberystwyth University and a Director of Information Automation Limited. He has specialised in the field of collection management and, in particular, in the management of electronic collections. Ray has published extensively and has edited several national and international professional and academic journals. Chris runs a consultancy, research and training company, Information Automation Limited, which he set up in 1987. The company specialises in all forms of electronic resources and in electronic publishing, a topic on which Chris has taught a module in the Department in Aberystwyth. Chris is a regular writer, and sits on the editorial boards of three professional journals. He is also a National Councillor of CILIP.

For more information or to book a place on this course, please visit www.ukeig.org.uk <http://www.ukeig.org.uk/>  or email meetings@ukeig.org.uk

Don’t forget the UKeiG Conference 2009

UKeiG will be holding a residential forum that will provide opportunities for information and IT professionals to network while catching up on the very latest developments in e-information. This event will have the added benefits of having the opportunity to wine and dine in excellent social surroundings and being excellent value for money

Book now at www.ukeig.org.uk <http://www.ukeig.org.uk/>  or by emailing conference@ukeig.org.uk to get your early bird discount!

UKeiG has the CILIP Seal of Recognition, which recognises high standards in the content and relevance of training courses. See http://www.cilip.org.uk/qualificationschartership/seal/ for details

UKeiG is a Special Interest Group of CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE. Registered Charity No. 313014

Booking Form – Getting to grips with developing and managing e-book collections: an introduction

Netskills Training Suite, University of Newcastle
Tuesday 27th October 2009, 9.30 – 16.30

Costs (including lunch and refreshments):

UKeiG members £160 + VAT (£184.00); others £190 + VAT (£218.50)
Please complete and return this form by 20th October 2009, to Christine Baker, Piglet Cottage, Redmire, Leyburn, North Yorkshire DL8 4EH.  Tel & Fax 01969 625751.  Email: cabaker@ukeig.org.uk

Name(s)…………………………………………………………………………………………..
Organisation……………………………………………………………………………………..
Address……………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………….
……………………………………………………………Post  Code………………………….
Tel…………………………………Email………………………………………………………

*I am/am not a member of UKeiG (*please delete as necessary)
*I enclose a cheque for ………………….made payable to UKeiG
*Please invoice me/my organisation
[* please delete as necessary]

A cancellation fee of £25.00 + VAT is payable.  No refunds after 20th October 2009

Please specify any special dietary requirements ……………………………………………

__Please tick if a CPD certificate is required.

Data Protection Act 1998

__Please tick if you do not wish your name and affiliation to appear on the delegate list.

__If you are not a member of UKeiG, please tick if you do wish to receive information about future courses and other UKeiG activities

UKeiG accepts firm bookings by post, fax, email and through the UKeiG Web site. All fees are payable in full prior to the date of the course. Cancellations received less than 7 working days before the start of the course will be subject to the full fee. For non-attendance at a course there will be no refunds and the full fee will be payable. Substitutions may be made at any time without additional cost. UKeiG reserves the right to cancel a course if insufficient bookings have been received. Delegates will be offered an alternative date or a full refund of the course fee. UKeiG reserves the right to make changes to the programme. UKeiG will not be liable for any consequential loss of travel or accommodation fees due to cancellation of the course.

JISC Survey Report – Managing and Promoting e-Content a Major Concern

JISC released a survey last week reporting the major concerns of library management (UK libraries).

Key findings included:

e-Resources/electronic content was cited most frequently as a key challenge facinglibraries and LRCs with issues including management, sharing, provision, access toand financial constraints. Others challenges included wider funding and financialissues (particularly within HE), and keeping up-to-date with new technologies andincorporating them into library/LRC services. Pressure on space was also mentionedcommonly by HE respondents. Press Release Full Report

JISC eBooks Project

From the Joint Information Systems Committee (UK). This is one of the largest studies known on eBooks.

What is it?
The national e-books observatory project will assess the impacts, observe behaviours and develop new models to stimulate the e-books market, and do all this in a managed environment.

More info and survey results available at: JISC http://www.jiscebooksproject.org/
check out the results of the deep log analysis study of student ebook usage