Tag Archives: JSTOR

Books at JSTOR titles now available via GOBI

Just received an email from Valerie Yaw at JSTOR with great news for libraries using GOBI.  You can now purchase JSTOR ebooks through GOBI.  Valerie said that both a single-user model and unlimited-user model (available for 60% of titles) are available through GOBI.  The unlimited-user model offers unlimited simultaneous use, unlimited DRM-free chapter downloads, and unlimited printing and copy/paste.  Libraries will need to sign JSTOR’s participation agreement for Books, available on their website here: http://about.jstor.org/agreements-riders.  They offer tiered savings to libraries, and once they have an agreement on file, the library will see pricing in GOBI that reflects their savings level.  Continue reading

Books at JSTOR to launch in November

JSTOR is pleased to announce that Books at JSTOR will be live in November 2012. Books at JSTOR will feature more than 14,000 scholarly monographs from leading academic presses, and will be fully integrated with the more than 1,600 current and archival journals on JSTOR, including links to and from book reviews.

An initial title list, as well as more information on the program, is available at http://books.jstor.org. Continue reading

JSTOR launches Register & Read program

Interesting article in Inside Higher Ed this morning about a new JSTOR program, Register & Read.  The program allows any visitors the opportunity to check out 3 items fromt he JSTOR archive.  Here is an excerpt from the article:

“The new program, called Register & Read, will soon let anybody read articles in the JSTOR archives at no cost. Under the new program, unsubscribed visitors will be allowed to check out three “items” from the JSTOR archive every two weeks, which they will be able to read for free. In order to prevent piracy, the texts will be displayed as image files (so that text cannot be copied). Users will not be able to download the files. The depletion of the traditional professoriate has produced a new demographic of unmoored scholars who might not have “the consistency of access that they want,” says Heidi McGregor, a spokeswoman for JSTOR. The goal of Register & Read would be to better serve that population — as well as others that the organization might not have even known about. Seventy journals are participating in the pilot, including Ecology, American Anthropologist, PMLA, the Journal of Political Economy, the Journal of Finance, and the American Historical Review.

JSTOR announces free journal content

From a JSTOR Press Release:  On September 6, 2011, we announced that we are making journal content in JSTOR published prior to 1923 in the United States and prior to 1870 elsewhere freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world.  This “Early Journal Content” includes discourse and scholarship in the arts and humanities, economics and politics, and in mathematics and other sciences.  It includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than 200 journals. This represents 6% of the content on JSTOR. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

Books at JSTOR adds Four New Academic Presses

A JSTOR Press Release:  Four prominent academic publishers in the United States announced plans today to bring their scholarly books online at JSTOR, one of the most well-known and widely used scholarly research sites. This is the second wave of presses to join the Books at JSTOR initiative. The initial group included Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale University Presses.

“The digital landscape is taking shape for academic books, and we are thrilled to be partnering with a set of publishers that share our commitment to disseminating superior scholarship and an organization that has a great track record of meeting the needs of libraries and researchers,” said Alison Mudditt, Director of University of California Press. Continue reading

Credo Reference Content now Discoverable in EBSCO Discovery Service

From an email I received, also linked on PR Web:

EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO) and Credo Reference, the online reference service, have extended their partnership allowing the reference content from Credo Reference to be discoverable within EBSCO Discovery Service™ (EDS). Metadata from Credo General Reference, Credo Topic Pages and Publisher Collections will be added to the EDS Base Index. The addition of this rich and extensive content will impact searchers using the EDS single search interface by providing reference content and overviews of top research topics within discovery. Continue reading

“Books at JSTOR”

Last week I posted a very brief announcement about JSTOR and eBooks.  I’ve since been emailed this more thorough press release.

January 11, 2011 – New York, NY – Five of the nation’s leading university presses – Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale – are at the forefront of a new effort to publish scholarly books online as part of the non-profit service JSTOR.  Their books, representing ground-breaking scholarship across the humanistic, social, and scientific disciplines, are expected to be available in 2012. Continue reading

University Presses Finally Have eBook Options

Great article in the Chronicle of Higher Education today about 4 options UPs have for creating eBook content.  The choices include:  JSTOR, Project MUSE, Oxford University Press, and a consortium led by several midsize presses.

From the COHE article, written by Jennifer Howard – “Everyone is rushing now to announce,” Douglas Armato, director of the University of Minnesota Press, said via e-mail. He has been involved in the planning conversations behind some of the new ventures. “The good news, I think, is that the e-transition for the institutional market is clearly—and finally—at escape velocity,” he added.

eBooks Coming to JSTOR

A message from JSTOR about forthcoming University Press eBooks.

For the past 6 months, we have been working closely with 8 university presses as well as librarians and faculty to consider whether we can make a valuable and impactful contribution to the academic community by helping to bring scholarly books online. We believe we can. Our press partners are eager to further this collaboration, and the ITHAKA Board of Trustees recently approved our moving forward with the effort. Please come to our participants’ meeting during ALA Midwinter to hear more about it. It’s on Sunday from 8-10 AM at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel, Room Sapphire 400. If you can’t make it, please try to attend the Chief Collection Development Officers of Large Research Libraries meeting on Saturday, January 8, 8:00 am to noon at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel, Room Indigo A where it will be discussed, or stop by booth #808 and talk with our staff.