Tag Archives: Kindle

Articles of Interest – Penguin/OverDrive edition

A flurry of blog posts and news articles are appearing related to the Penguin announcement to suspend library lending of titles. Here are a few articles of interest:

OverDrive Suspends Access to New Penguin eBook Titles, “Get For Kindle” Access Also Shutdown « INFOdocket

Penguin Group USA to No Longer Allow Library Lending of New Ebook Titles — The Digital Shift

This Deal Is Getting Worse All the Time | Library Renewal

Penguin Pulls eBooks From Public Libraries Dropping it Down to 1 of the Big 6 Publishers Playing Nice With Libraries | Librarian by Day

Why Might A Publisher Pull Its E-Books From Libraries? by Laura Hazard Owen « INFOdocket

Why Penguin is worried about the role of Amazon’s Kindle in libraries – CSMonitor.com

Kindle Fire, Kindle Touch, and the $79 Kindle

Big news today from Amazon about the forthcoming release of the new Kindle Fire, a $199 tablet to be available on November 15th.  In addition to the Fire, Amazon also introduced  a touchscreen e-reader called Kindle Touch.  It’s black and white with no keyboard and will cost $99 for wi-fi version.  Finally, they announced the $79 non-touchscreen Kindle.  Plenty of news stories are covering the details.  Here is a sampling:

How does Amazon Kindle Fire stack up against competition? – The Washington Post Continue reading

OverDrive, Amazon, and Privacy – INFODocket explores the questions

Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy at INFODocket are asking some very important questions about end-user privacy when borrowing OverDrive  library books through a third party vendor site (Amazon). The post asks:

  • Is Amazon collecting download information?
  • Is Amazon saving library download info permanently?
  • If not, how long will they keep it? Is there a retention policy?
  • Can you provide any info about privacy as it relates to OverDrive/Amazon?
  • Will the library books you borrow be used by Amazon to provide recommendations of books for you to purchase?
  • Is there a link to scrub all of your personal “library” data from Amazon.com’s servers with a single click?
  • Do OverDrive and Amazon.com have any suggestions about how to make the entire process clearer to users?
  • How would they respond to the issue that, since the service is being marketed by libraries, users might incorrectly think library privacy policies may still apply?

More information about this issue is available via the INFODocket blog post.

OverDrive Press Release about Kindle lending launch – sites up within days

Just received this OverDrive press release in email:

In a move highly anticipated since its initial announcement in April, public libraries and schools in the U.S. can now lend eBooks for the Amazon® Kindle.  OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) announced today that it has begun adding Kindle compatibility to all of the U.S. public and school libraries in its network and expects to have all sites updated within days.  This is a very significant step in a series of OverDrive WIN platform enhancements to streamline user experience and help libraries meet the increased demand for eBooks.

OverDrive, the leading multichannel digital distributor of eBooks, audiobooks and other digital content, supplies 15,000 public and school libraries worldwide and more than 11,000 in the U.S.  To see if your local library is a member of the OverDrive network, visit OverDrive Search. Continue reading

Kindle Books Now Available at over 11,000 Local Libraries

Picked up this news from Nate Hoffelder’s tweet (@thDigitalReader)

From the Amazon Press Release (9/21):

Amazon.com today announced that Kindle and Kindle app customers can now borrow Kindle books from more than 11,000 local libraries in the United States. When a customer borrows a Kindle library book, they’ll have all of the unique features they love about Kindle books, including Whispersync, which automatically synchronizes their margin notes, highlights and bookmarks, real page numbers, Facebook and Twitter integration, and more. For more information about borrowing library books for your Kindle or free Kindle apps, go to www.amazon.com/kindle/publiclibraries. To start checking out Kindle library books, visit your local library’s website. Continue reading

Kindle library lending in beta

Kindle library lending is in beta at two public libraries – King County Library System and the Seattle Public Library. (See article in Seattle Times).  News and instructions have been posted on various blogs and articles, but yesterday Library Journal‘s Mike Kelley reported, “Andra Addison, the director of Seattle PL’s communication office, said the library was not publicizing its testing because “It is embargoed until it is available to all partners.”

Nate Hoffelder at The Digital Reader has been closely following any news of Kindle library lending.  He has a really good post about the new service on his blog.

Here is a clip:

“Neither Amazon nor OverDrive have announced anything, and in fact I’m still waiting to hear back from my contacts at Overdrive. But I do know that Amazon’s help pages now refer to the library ebooks as a current feature, and OverDrive already list the Kindle as having beta support. The service is indeed live. Continue reading

Amazon, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble, Google Books remove in-app purchasing from iOS apps

Apple’s new in-app selling rules are in effect, requiring retailers to give Apple 30% of revenues from book sales.  As a result, Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Google Books have stopped selling books through their apps.  SONY’s app was rejected back in February for the same reasons.  There’s lots of news coverage, a few are linked below:

Kindle, Nook & Kobo Apple Apps No Longer Sell eBooks – GalleyCat

Amazon caves to Apple, drops Kindle’s in-app button – Computerworld

Sidestepping Apple: From Amazon to Condé, Companies Rethink Their App Strategies | Epicenter | Wired.com