Tag Archives: Kobo

Amazon, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble, Google Books remove in-app purchasing from iOS apps

Apple’s new in-app selling rules are in effect, requiring retailers to give Apple 30% of revenues from book sales.  As a result, Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Google Books have stopped selling books through their apps.  SONY’s app was rejected back in February for the same reasons.  There’s lots of news coverage, a few are linked below:

Kindle, Nook & Kobo Apple Apps No Longer Sell eBooks – GalleyCat

Amazon caves to Apple, drops Kindle’s in-app button – Computerworld

Sidestepping Apple: From Amazon to Condé, Companies Rethink Their App Strategies | Epicenter | Wired.com

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues — Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

Springer, who has existing eRetail partnerships with Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble, and others, announced this week the addition of the Google eBookstore for Springer eBook titles.

From their press release:  Springer eBooks can now also be purchased via Google’s eBookstore. Google currently holds the biggest collection of Springer eBooks with more than 52,000 books, which is a combination of physically scanned books published prior to 2006 and PDF file submissions since 2006. Springer adds 4,000 newly published titles per year.

Springer eBooks are also available on Amazon for the Kindle, and in the near future Barnes & Noble for the NookStudy.com platform, Kobo Books, B&T BLIO, Entourage and Apple’s iBooks, which is now receiving books in the free and open ebook format ePub. Springer will soon also deliver books in ePub format to Amazon for the Kindle. Continue reading

Why Amazon will never work with libraries

Very interesting blog post at ireaderreview.com on why Amazon will never work with libraries.  The blog is not an official Kindle site, and the writer is portraying his views from a big business perspective, so keep this in mind before you shoot through the roof with anger, librarians.  The comments are colorful as well, and worth a look.   Let’s say this IS true, and Amazon will never work with libraries.  Does this change your attitude toward loaning Kindles and buying content from Amazon to support the Kindles?  If nook, SONY, Kobo, and others are better suited for library content, would you rather buy, loan and promote these devices in your library? I would.

Articles of Interest

Ebook sales rise 130% in November

Is the $5.00 eBook the New $9.99 eBook? – eBookNewser

ALA Midwinter 2011: ALCTS Panel Considers the Impact of Patron-Driven Acquisition on Selection and Collections

Google Acquires eBook Technologies | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Kobo adds 175K Education, Technical and Reference PDFs

Bridging the eBook-Library System Divide

Goodbye, DRM? FutureBook blog

Blio Partners with Dell ” PWxyz

Amid E-Book Growth, Students Still Prefer Paper Textbooks

Reader Apps vs. Dedicated Book Apps

Twitter Stats Reveal How the iPad, Kindle, and Nook Stack Up …

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

New Articles of Interest

Standards & Best Practices – Identifiers – Roadmap of Identifiers …BISG

Video – Students Love AccessMyLibrary School Edition – Gale/Cengage

Hands-On with a New e-Reader – NYTimes.com

Library Labs Turn to Their Patrons for Project Ideas – Wired Campus

Why Share Open Educational Resources? – College Open Textbooks Blog

Library can’t lend an eBook to Kindle user | StarTribune.com

Xerox to sell and service Espresso Book Machines

Kobo announces WiFi ereader – faster processor, new screen

Ready to ditch paper? Here are the top 10 e-readers

Kno announces 14-inch single-screen tablet

Amazon Patent Could Charge For Browsing A Book Online – eBookNewser

Amazon launches “Kindle on the Web”

Public Libraries, Why aren’t you lending nook, Kobo, COOL-ER and SONY eReaders?

I’m really curious about this, and reading a blog post from the Librarian in Black, which summarized a library futures event has gotten me even more curious.

Most public libraries who are lending eBook readers (at least those in the news) are loaning Kindles.  Why aren’t they lending nook, Kobo, COOL-ER, and SONY readers?  Kindle readers are not compatible with any of the library eBook aggregator content and require that libraries purchase titles again, in the Kindle format.  But nook, Kobo, COOL-ER, and SONY readers ARE compatible with some OverDrive and NetLibrary titles because they are in Adobe Digital Editions or PDF formats.  Am I missing something here?  Isn’t is plausible that a public library with large OverDrive and NetLibrary collections could pre-load already purchased content onto a compatible device and lend the device and the title to the patron? The Kobo reader comes loaded with 100 free titles.  Many free eBooks can be loaded onto these devices as well (even the Kindle is open to some of these).

Is it the fine print? Is it the content?  Or is it lack of knowledge on devices?  Your input on this issue is much appreciated.

Articles of Interest

The case for the dedicated e-reader: When is it time to go off the grid

Inkling for iPad: eTextbook Reading Done Right

NBC video: Checking out library e-books

The Future Of Reading

University of Texas San Antonio opens nation’s first bookless library on a university campus

Kobo desktop application now available for download

Playing Hard to Get: Purchasing and Reading E-Books

Wikipedia for Credit – Inside Higher Ed

The All E-Book Diet – Inside Higher Ed

TeleRead meets with Sony in New York to see Sony’s new ereaders; impression – sophisticated refinement

Michael Bills of Baker & Taylor on the Future of Ebooks and Libraries

Articles of Interest

Hot reads this week.  Here’s a list of some good ones:

New from Bowker: Selection of Statistics from Consumer-Focused Research Report for Book Industry « ResourceShelf

The digital era has not made publishers defunct

Kobo Now Supports ePub and PDF files

Google Book Search beneficial to publishing industry, study shows

The ABC’s of E-Reading – Wall Street Journal

Virginia State University Business School Buys E-textbooks for Students

Ebook market share at B&N tops their print book share