Tag Archives: Library Journal

Articles of Interest: Harper Collins Edition 2

For the week of March 11th:

IGI Launches Advances in Library Information Science Newsletter

IGI Publishing launched the inaugural issue of the Advances in Library Information Science (ALIS) Newsletter today.  The newsletter provides a value-added tool that gives a pre-publication, no-strings-attached glimpse into the library and information science content.  The Editor-in-Chief for the IGI ALIS series is Mirela Roncevic, formerly with Library Journal.

In the first newsletter, the forthcoming title edited by Sue Polanka, E-Reference Context and Discoverability in Libraries: Issues and Concepts, is highlighted offering eight essays.  The full book, to be released in the fall of 2011, boasts over 20 unique chapters on the issues and concepts surrounding reference content, written by  thirty-one contributors representing academic, public, and school libraries, publishers, library school professors, and other information industry professionals.

More information about the ALIS newsletter .

Read the preface of the forthcoming E-Reference title.

Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Last summer, Library Journal and School Library Journal conducted an eBook survey for libraries.  The survey was designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences.  They included an academic, public, and school library version of the survey.  Hundreds of questions were asked and hundreds of libraries responded. The results of those surveys were published in November, 2010 in three separate reports.  The executive summaries of each are available on the Library Journal site (and linked below), and full reports are available for purchase.  There were 1,842 respondents, broken down to 364 academic, 781 public, and 697 school libraries.  I’ve captured some of the data to share with you, but the reports are full of additional information on budgets, marketing, barriers to adoption, patron preference, and much, much more.  A primer on ebook readers and formats is in the appendix of each full report. Thanks to Josh Hadro at Library Journal for sharing the reports with me and allowing me to publish some of the data here on No Shelf Required. Continue reading

Libraries Belong in the eBook EcoSystem

Fabulous post, and summary of the Digital Book World Conference thus far, from Eric Hellman.  He reports on a panel discussion from DBW today, moderated by Josh Hadro at Library Journal.  LJ has a great summary article of the discussion as well.  The topic – why libraries belong in the eBook ecosystem.  Panelists included OverDrive CEO, Steve Potash, New York Public Library Deputy Director Christopher Platt, and big 6 vice president, Random House Director of Account Marketing Ruth Liebmann.  I followed some of the tweets today, which were great.  You can see the stream at #dbwlibrary and #dbw11.

ProQuest to Digitize 30,000 rare early books from National Library of the Netherlands

January 11, 2011 (ANN ARBOR, Mich.) – ProQuest will digitize more than 30,000 rare early books from the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (KB), the National Library of the Netherlands, capturing every volume in high-resolution color scans. This is the third major European national library to participate in ProQuest’s Early European Books project after the Danish Royal Library, Copenhagen and the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze in Italy. As with the agreements in Denmark and Italy, the material will be free to access in the host country. Continue reading

Oxford University Press Creates Online Platform for University Press Content

From an OUP Press Release I received via email:  January 11, 2011 – Oxford University Press is pleased to announce the creation of a groundbreaking online platform for university press monograph content. Having redeveloped the award-winning Oxford Scholarship Online platform, OUP is launching University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO) and inviting the University Press community to take advantage of a fully enabled XML environment with the cutting edge search and discovery functionality that has marked the success of Oxford Scholarship Online. Continue reading

Using Bluefire Reader to Download Library eBooks

There have been several blog posts this week about using the BlueFire Reader application to download eBooks from library collections to various iOS devices.  Josh Hadro from Library Journal has a great post with step-by-step instructions and screen shots.  Other posts, not as detailed as Josh’s, include:

CNet – Bluefire Reader brings free public-library e-books to iOS

Another post from the Download Squad site offers a brief description with a couple of screen shots.

Articles of Interest

Three misperceptions about the ebook business

Textbooks headed for ash heap of history?

A Student’s Stranded On A Desert Island … Tech Devices

Inside the Google Books Algorithm – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

iTunes U Introduces Free eBooks: Download Shakespeare’s Complete Works

Joe Wikert’s Publishing 2020 Blog: eBooks: Lending vs. Reselling

Forrester Research on future of ebooks: $3 billion by 2015

Will Your Local Library Lend E-Books? (Or Can They?)

Library eBooks on the iPad/iPhone, no Sync Required – Library Journal

Kindle Facts and Figures (history & specs)

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with the Publishers Association.

Reprinted in full from Library Journal, October 15, 2010. Francine, you go girl!

Dear Publishers,

We missed you, but, more importantly, you missed out on an opportunity to engage in discussion with a large market already invested in the future of ebooks. ­Library Journal and School Library Journal’s first virtual ebook summit—a daylong event on September 29—focused on how public, academic, and school libraries are addressing digital books. It drew over 2100 registrants who stayed for an average of five and one-half hours. Over 238 libraries purchased site licenses so staff could come and go. At Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, the event drew—and distracted—the entire leadership team from its regularly scheduled meeting. (The summit archive is still available online, until December 31, 2010, at www.ebook-summit.com.) Continue reading

Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Yesterday at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion of the acquisition models of eBooks for academic libraries.  We chatted about business models, workflow issues and their opportunities and challenges, the pros and cons of electronic access,and the future of eBooks.  I was pretty busy doing my moderating duties and didn’t get a chance to summarize the program, but luckily some folks at LJ did.  Here is what they had to say: Continue reading