Tag Archives: Library Journal

New articles of interest

These articles are all linked on the NSR home page in the delicious links.

Espresso Book Machines: Lurch winning friends at Northshire Bookstore—whats next?

Michael Nielsen ” Is scientific publishing about to be disrupted?

The e-book wars: Google vs. Amazon vs. Apple—and how they may duke it out

Springer leaps ahead in academic e-book market

Arizona State Sued Over Kindle E-Textbook Usage – 7/2/2009 – Library Journal

New articles of interest

I’ve bookmarked the following articles relating to eBooks on my delicious account.  These are displayed on the NSR homepage as well.

BYU Using the Kindle for ILL

Hotdog, someone has started a much needed plan to get eBooks part of the ILL program.  According to a 6/10/09 LJ article, BYU Library has a pilot program wth 3 Kindles.  They are  circulating these kindles with a variety of very new titles, too new for ILL.  Verbal permission was given from Amazon, nothing in writing.  Highly recommended to speak with Amazon before you delve into loaning out Kindles.  Check out the article for more details.

University of Pennsylvania to Digitize and Print-on-Demand

I read this article in LJ about another library digitization/print-on demand product.  This time it’s with the University of Pennsylvania (UP) and Kirtas.  UP is now part of the elite group of libraries providing print-on-demand services including University of Michigan, Emory, and Cornell.

The UP project will scan books in the public domain (200,000), but only when a title is requested by an end user.   So, it’s kind of like the Patron Driven Acquisition ebook model, but now it’s being done in reverse.  Take the print, digitize it, then print a copy on demand to ship to a user.  Price information was not listed on the UP Press Release.

Overdrive Promises more Content, Less DRM

From the TeleRead blog:
OverDrive: ‘Much more content without DRM’ promised for libraries in ‘09
By David Rothman

image Again and again I’ve asked the IDPF to please consider a logo for DRMless ePub books. OverDrive founder Steve Potash is also president of the IDPF, and recently he told Library Journal:

“OverDrive is the leader in bringing downloadable MP3 audiobooks to libraries. [It] is leading the library market in bringing all formats of digital media to readers—including much more content without DRM during 2009.”

I hope that includes copyrighted e-books, too, not just MP3. Like Steve, I’m keen on writers and publishers getting paid, and there are ways for this to happen without DRM. For now, I’ll regard the above statement as indicating at least some flexibility.

Meanwhile check out other comments in the LJ piece, headlined Apple’s DRM News said to have little effect on libraries for now.

(Thanks to Ed Klopek.)

E-Reference Ratings from LJ

LJ just released E-Reference Ratings, “an evaluation of nearly 180 subscription based electronic resources in 14 subject categories.”  Of course, many of these are eBook platforms like Britannica, Credo, GVRL, Oxford, and Sage.   There was no category for eBooks, instead you’ll find them listed under the various subject categories.

Products were reviewed by a team of 8 reference experts and included 7 criteria:  scope, writing, design, linking, bells & whistles, ease of use, value.  Resources were given a star rating, 1 to 4 stars to indicate * poor, ** satisfactory, ***good, ****excellent  A brief paragraph also accompanied each resource.

According to LJ, “Because we know that online resources continually grow and evolve—a list of this nature can date quickly—E-Reference Ratings, which made a print debut in the November 15th Reference Announcements issue, will find its permanent home and reach its full potential on our web site. We intend not only to keep up with these ever-changing products (adjusting the ratings as necessary) but also to expand the number of databases in each category and venture into new ones. We hope to hear from all parties—librarians, publishers, and vendors—about how we can keep this tool thriving and make it even more useful.”

Congrats LJ!  This was no small feat.�

VERSO – Virtual Electronic Reference Source Organizer

A visual way to search for eBooks in the library collection – VERSO.  From the Quinnipiac University’s Arnold Bernhard Library in Hamden, CT.  Check it out.

For more information on VERSO, read the recent article in Library Journal – “A grassroots response to a surge in e-resources yields a new virtual reference shelf.” By Terry Ballard, 5/15/2008